For a complete list of courses and course descriptions please see the University Catalog.  For further questions please contact the department.


Spring 2021 Course Offerings


NAS 101 (0001-LEC), Class #67420, Introduction to Native American Studies, TTH 12:30-1:45pm, REMOTE, 3cr. Max Enrollment: 50, Instructor: John Bear Mitchell
Course Description: This course will survey American Indian social, philosophical, spiritual, and cultural aspects in historical and contemporary society. It examines the issues and experiences of Native people from a variety of perspectives. Satisfies the General Education Social Contexts & Institutions and Cultural Diversity & International Perspectives requirements. Prerequisites: None

NAS 101 (0990-LEC), Class #67421, Introduction to Native American Studies, WEB-ONLINE ONLY, 3cr. Max Enrollment: 60, Instructor: Lisa Neuman
Course Description: This course will survey American Indian social, philosophical, spiritual, and cultural aspects in historical and contemporary society. It examines the issues and experiences of Native people from a variety of perspectives. Satisfies the General Education Social Contexts & Institutions and Cultural Diversity & International Perspectives requirements. Prerequisites: None

NAS 101 (WINT-LEC), Class #67422, Introduction to Native American Studies, WINTER-ONLINE ONLY, 3cr. Max Enrollment: 50, Instructor: John Bear Mitchell
Course Description: This course will survey American Indian social, philosophical, spiritual, and cultural aspects in historical and contemporary society. It examines the issues and experiences of Native people from a variety of perspectives. Satisfies the General Education Social Contexts & Institutions and Cultural Diversity & International Perspectives requirements. Prerequisites: None

NAS 102 (0860-LEC), Class #67461, Intro to Wabanaki Culture/History/Issues, T 4:00-6:50pm, REMOTE, 3 cr. Max Enrollment: 50, Instructor: John Bear Mitchell
Course Description: This course provides an overview of the tribes that make up the Wabanaki Confederacy: the Penobscot, the Passamaquoddy, the Maliseet and the Micmac. It will provide a survey of the individual tribes’ historic, cultures, philosophic, and creation stories, as well as a brief overview of Canadian, U.S., and Maine Indian history. This course will discuss and explore current issues and concerns as well as critical concepts such as sovereignty, treaty rights, and tribal government.

NAS 203 (0001-LEC), Class #69100, Wabanaki Language II, TH 4:00-6:50pm, REMOTE, 3cr. Max Enrollment: 20, Instructor: Roger Paul
Course Description: Wabanaki Languages 2 is intended for students that have finished level 1 or those who have a knowledge of Wabanaki vocabulary. This class will focus on short interactions and sentence structure. Students will be introduced to the Passamaquoddy-Wolastoqey writing system and will create sentences to present and discuss in class. Manipulation of verb phrases and some morphology will help students read and comprehend Wabanaki sentences. Students will be able to prepare and deliver a short presentation to the class in a Wabanaki Languag

NAS 230(0001-LEC), Class #68931, cross listed ​HTY​ ​222, Class #68930​, ME Indian History in the 20th Century, MWF 9:00-9:50am, D.P.Corbett 100, 3cr. Max Enrollment Combined: 29, Instructor: Micah Pawling
Course Description: Too often Native people are relegated to the distant past, leading society to have misunderstandings about indigenous communities today.  This course introduces students to Wabanaki history of Maine and eastern Canada in the twentieth century.  The term Wabanaki is all-inclusive term that refers primarily to the Mi’kmaqs, Maliseets, Passamaquoddies, and Penobscots, along with other Abenaki groups.  The tribal homeland encompasses present-day northern New England, the Maritime provinces, and southern Quebec. We will explore the variety of ways Wabanaki experiences deviated from the national narrative on American Indians and examine when Native challenges were in lockstep with western tribes in the twentieth century. The course considers the interplay between cultural traditions and modernity. The regional scope highlights local developments.  We will investigate prominent themes of resistance, accommodation, activism, sovereignty, water, and cultural survival. Wabanaki people were positive actors in their own affairs, not passive pawns subdued by forces beyond their control. The course will provide context to contemporary challenges Wabanaki people confront.  As one tribal historian astutely noted, “I can never give up hope, like my ancestors never gave up hope.” This course satisfies these General Education requirements: Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives; Population and the Environment.

NAS 270(0001-LEC), Class #68769, cross listed ​WGS​ ​270, Class #68770​, Gender in Native American Culture, TTH 9:30-10:45am, REMOTE, 3cr. Max Enrollment Combined: 24, Instructor: Sherri Mitchell
Course Description: This course explores the concept of gender in indigenous communities of North America. Course materials will explore historical and contemporary perspectives of gender, sexual orientation, and masculine and feminine balance, to better understand how Native communities define and practice gender. (WGS 270 and NAS 270 are identical courses).

NAS 298 (0001-IND), Class #67766, Directed Study in Native American Studies, Max Enrollment Combined: 10, Instructor: Darren Ranco
Course Description: Individual study, research, field experience and writing projects in Native American Studies.  May be repeated for credit.  Arranged upon request.  Prerequisite: NAS 101 and permission

NAS 401(0001-LEC), Class #67573, cross listed ​ANT​ ​430, Class #68758​, Who Owns Native Culture, TTH 11:00am-12:15pm, REMOTE, 3cr. Max Enrollment Combined: 29, Instructor: Darren Ranco
Course Description: The answer to the simple question of who owns Native American/American Indian/indigenous cultures and cultural productions is surprisingly complex and engages the history of anthropology and the nature of academic knowledge itself.  This course will examine the evolving relationships between anthropologists, historians, and other researchers with indigenous peoples (in particular American Indians) and what kinds of ethical and legal relationships have evolved over time to address this question.  It will also look at the ways in which contemporary cultural resource management by indigenous peoples serves as a key articulation of indigenous nationhood and sovereignty.  Special attention will be given to recent scholarship by indigenous researchers that decolonizes standard academic practices and roots the ownership of Native cultures and research in Native communities.

NAS 498 (0001-IND), Class #67767, Directed Study in Native American Studies, Max Enrollment: 10, Instructor: Darren Ranco
Course Description: Advanced individual study, research, field experiences and writing projects in Native American Studies.  May be repeated for credit.  Arranged upon request.  Department Consent Required.  Enrollment Requirements: Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing and NAS 101 and one additional course within the Native American Studies minor and permission

For questions or permission, please contact: Native American Programs office at 207.581.1417 or email Jen Bowen at jennifer.bowen@maine.edu