Erin Percival Carter, Ph.D.

Erin Percival Carter, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Marketing whose research seeks to better understand how people think about the following:

    • What makes things authentic
    • What makes an action moral or immoral in the modern marketplace 
    • What is important for their own well-being

She is particularly focused on how these judgments and decisions affect the market for agricultural and sustainability-focused products. Erin received her Ph.D. from the University of Colorado – Boulder and her B.S. from the University of Wyoming. Erin previously worked as a Marketing Manager for a holding company with businesses in the construction, energy, battery technology, and dining industries. Erin occasionally provides behavioral consulting services.

Education

  • Ph.D., Marketing, University of Colorado, Boulder
  • B.S., Marketing, University of Wyoming

Teaching Areas

Consumer Behavior, Sales and Personal Selling, Experimental Design, Market Intelligence

Dr. Erin Percival Carter’s CV

Service Work / Consulting

Erin has engaged in public and private sector consulting for clients ranging from local governments to Fortune 500, multinational firms. When offering consulting services, Erin focuses on utilizing behavioral experiments to provide consumer insights.

Awards and Professional Accomplishments

  • University of Maine Center for Undergraduate Research (CUGR) Faculty Fellow (2020-2021)
  • University of Maine, Maine Business School Dean’s Research Award, 2019
  • Qualtrics Behavioral Research Grant, 2015
  • AMA Sheth Doctoral Consortium Fellow, 2015
  • Haring Symposium Discussant, 2015
  • University of Colorado – Boulder Fellowship, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017
  • Gerald Hart Research Fellowship, 2013, 2014

Publications

Warren, Caleb, Erin Percival Carter, and A. Peter McGraw. Being Funny is Not Enough: Negative Feelings Predict When Humor is Persuasive. International Journal of Advertising

Conferences

Chaired Symposia

Campbell, Margaret C., and Percival Carter, Erin. No Harm, No Foul: The Role of Perceptions of Harm in Perceptions of Price Unfairness. Presented as part of a special session at the Association for Consumer Research Annual Conference; Baltimore, MD. Oct. 2014

Presenter

Percival Carter, Erin and McGraw, A. Peter. How Flawed Products Can Reveal Valuable Process Information.
Presented as part of a special session at the Association for Consumer Research Annual Conference; Baltimore, MD. Oct. 2014

Percival Carter, Erin and McGraw, A. Peter. How Flawed Products Can Reveal Valuable Process Information.
Presented as part of the Behavioral Science and Sustainability Session at the Sustainability: Transdisciplinary Theory, Practice, and Action Conference; Toronto, ON, Canada October 2019

Percival Carter, Erin, and McGraw, A. Peter. In Pursuit of Imperfection: Flawed Products Reduce Process Uncertainty.
Presented (by McGraw) as part of a special session at the Association for Consumer Research Annual Conference; Dallas, TX, Oct. 2018
Presented (by Percival Carter) as part of a special session at the Society for Consumer Psychology Winter Conference; Savannah, GA, Feb. – Mar. 2019

Percival Carter, Erin, and Williams, Lawrence. The Nature of Meaningful Consumption.
Presented as part of a special session at the Association for Consumer Research Annual Conference; San Diego, CA, Oct. 2017

Percival Carter, Erin, McGraw, A. Peter, and Williams, Lawrence. Hype Narrowly Benefits but Broadly Hurts Consumers’ Well-Being. (Based on 3rd essay of dissertation research)
Presented as a competitive paper at the Association for Consumer Research Annual Conference; Berlin, Germany Oct. 2016

Percival Carter, Erin, and McGraw, A. Peter. In Pursuit of Imperfection: Flawed Products Reduce Process Uncertainty.
Presented at the Behavioral Decision Research in Management Conference, Toronto, ON, Canada, June 2016 
Presented as a poster at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Judgment and Decision Making; Chicago, IL. Nov. 2015

Percival Carter, Erin, and Williams, Lawrence. Prolonging the Search for Meaning: How Hedonic Versus Eudaemonic Consumption Experiences Shape Preference for Variety.
Presented as part of a special session at the Association for Consumer Research Annual Conference; Baltimore, MD.