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More Than 100 Students to Showcase Work During GradExpo

University of Maine graduate students will showcase their research and artistic works during the Graduate Student Government’s 2014 Graduate Academic Exposition.

More than $8,000 in prizes will be awarded to participants of the GradExpo. The event will be held 8 a.m.–4 p.m. Thursday and Friday, April 3–4 in the Innovative Media Research and Commercialization (IMRC) Center on campus.

The GradExpo will feature four areas of competition — posters, oral presentations, intermedia and fine arts exhibits, and a PechaKucha, or rapid-fire slide show event. About 106 submissions are expected at this year’s event.

The poster and oral presentations will highlight the physical sciences and technology, natural sciences, humanities and social sciences. The intermedia and fine arts exhibits will include art works, projects and performances. The PechaKucha competition, open to students in all academic disciplines, invites participants to share their work in a slide show lasting under seven minutes. Unlike the other presentations, the PechaKucha talks will be judged by the audience rather than faculty reviewers.

Two new awards have been added this year, and will be presented during the awards gala, slated for 6 p.m. Friday, April 4 at the IMRC Center.

The Provost’s Innovative/Creative Teaching Award worth $500, $300 and $150 will be given to graduate students who are lead instructors of a UMaine course and use innovative and creative teaching methods. Eligible candidates will present at the expo. Jeffrey Hecker, UMaine’s executive vice president of academic affairs and provost, will designate judges to select the winners.

The UMaine Alumni Association Alum Award worth $250 will be given to a graduate student who earned their undergraduate degree at the University of Maine. Selected candidates will present their research to Alumni Association staff members who will select the winner.

Other awards will include:

Details of the expo are online. For more information or to request a disability accommodation, contact Robin Arnold, Graduate Student Government vice president, at robin.arnold@umit.maine.edu or 207.581.2398.

Contact: Elyse Kahl, 207.581.3747

MPBN to Rebroadcast ‘Sustainable Maine’ Series in May

In May, the Maine Public Broadcasting Network will rebroadcast episodes from the three seasons of the “Sustainable Maine” series. The show highlights the research of Maine’s Sustainability Solutions Initiative (SSI), based at UMaine’s Senator George J. Mitchell Center. SSI is helping communities solve interconnected economic problems while advancing sustainability science. SSI and Maine EPSCoR collaborated with MPBN to create the Emmy-nominated series. More information about “Sustainable Maine” is online.

The rebroadcast schedule is:

Three Honored With The First ADVANCE Career Recognition Awards

Three University of Maine faculty members — Kate Beard-Tisdale, Susan Brawley and Mary Tyler — are the recipients of ADVANCE Career Recognition Awards by UMaine’s Rising Tide Center.

Beard-Tisdale is a member of the School of Computing and Information Science; Brawley is in the School of Marine Science; and Tyler is in the School of Biology and Ecology.

The Career Recognition Awards highlight the significant accomplishments of women faculty at UMaine through their teaching, research, constituent service and campus leadership. Sharing the professional successes of UMaine faculty raises the profile of women scientists and is intended to inspire colleagues at every rank.

The honor includes a travel award to support the honorees’ participation at a prestigious conference where their work will be showcased on an international stage.

On campus, the award winners will give lectures about their research and will lead a panel discussion. Tyler will speak on, “Students Are Scientists: Implementing Inquiry-Based Learning,” noon, March 27, Coe Room, Memorial Union; Beard-Tisdale will speak on, “A Passage in Space and Time,” noon, April 10, Coe Room, Union.

Brawley will speak on, “Small Is Beautiful: Marine Eggs, Spores and Bacteria,” 2 p.m., April 16, Wells Conference Center, followed by the awards ceremony and reception. The event will feature a panel discussion with the awardees and accomplished junior faculty offering perspectives on the challenges and opportunities for women in science.

All events are free and open to the public. To register or to request a disability accommodation, call or write the ADVANCE Rising Tide Center, 207.581.3439; risingtide@maine.edu. More information is available online.

UMaine’s ADVANCE Rising Tide Center, funded by a five-year grant from the National Science Foundation, seeks to develop systemic approaches to retaining and advancing women faculty in academic science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) and social-behavioral science careers.

Gabe’s Study Cited in Morning Sentinel Article on Maine Maple Sunday

University of Maine economist Todd Gabe’s study on the maple industry’s financial impact on the state was cited in a Morning Sentinel article about Maine Maple Sunday. According to Gabe’s study, Maine has the third-largest maple syrup industry in the country, and each year, the industry directly contributes about $27.7 million in revenue, 567 full- and part-time jobs and $17.3 million in wages to Maine’s economy.

Humphrey Quoted in BDN Special Section Article on Maine’s Economy, Engineers

University of Maine College of Engineering Dean Dana Humphrey was quoted in the BDN Maine Special Sections article “Home-grown engineers key to Maine’s economy” that appeared in the publication BDN Maine Outlook: Business & Economic Development. Humphrey said he believes the state can decrease “brain drain” by exposing youth to engineering at an early age. “If you don’t have the engineers to design it, you can’t build it, whether it be a bridge or a jet engine,” Humphrey said, adding that engineers are a force multiplier in terms of economic development. An article on research by Beth Fulton, a UMaine Ph.D. student studying food science, was also including in the publication. Fulton is researching ways to use lobster shell waste to create a pigment extract as a green alternative to synthetic versions found in fish food.

Digital Journalism Class, BDN Collaborate on Bangor 2020 Project

The future of Bangor, Maine, is the focus of a multimedia project that pairs University of Maine journalism students with mentors at the Bangor Daily News (BDN).

UMaine professor Jennifer Moore is leading CMJ 481: Digital Journalism students in the project called Bangor 2020. The journalism juniors and seniors are conducting research, doing journalistic fieldwork and producing news packages using a variety of technologies for the online, multimedia project in partnership with the BDN.

The goal of the course is to create a discussion about the future development of the Greater Bangor Area. The class is about providing students with a learning environment both in and out of the classroom, and experience working on a project that can significantly add to their professional portfolio and make them competitive on the job market.

The theme of the project is “livable cities,” a term associated with promoting economic growth while maintaining sustainable living environments.

“Students will gain valuable, hands-on experience reporting on important issues facing Bangor,” Moore says. “We’re focusing reporting and production in a ‘digital-first’ mindset that’s so important for anyone who wants to enter the world of professional journalism.

“Working this closely with mentors at the BDN — in a collaborative learning environment — is new in CMJ curriculum, and we hope to continue this relationship in future classes.”

Anthony Ronzio, BDN director of news and audience, says the course will “challenge the students into conceptualizing, analyzing and, ultimately, storytelling an issue of great local importance, with advice and guidance from professionals along the way. The final product would be of high enough quality to publish in the BDN.”

At the end of the semester, students also will give a public presentation to showcase their work.

“This project requires curiosity and hones the information-gathering skills that you need to satiate that curiosity. It also gives you, as a student journalist, a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the different ways to tell a story while sharpening the basic journalistic skills we’ve developed in our other courses,” says Jonathan Ouellette, a senior in the class.

Ronzio says UMaine’s journalism department and the BDN can learn from each other. “By working together, we can make a brighter future for UMaine journalism students and help the BDN adapt to the new journalism that must be done in the 21st century,” he says.

Contact: Margaret Nagle, 207.581.3745

Press Herald Reports on UMaine Offshore Wind Project’s Push for Federal Funding

The Portland Press Herald reported on the University of Maine-led proposed offshore wind pilot project and its fight for federal funding. Maine Aqua Ventus, a group made up of UMaine and partner companies, is competing  against Seattle-based Principle Power for up to $47 million in matching federal energy funds to demonstrate the technology for next-generation offshore wind turbines. The Press Herald also reported members of Maine’s congressional delegation have been actively involved in promoting UMaine’s project.

UMaine Offshore Wind Project Focus of ASME Article

A proposed offshore wind pilot project and floating test turbine created by Maine Aqua Ventus, which includes the University of Maine and partner companies, was the focus of the ASME article “First offshore wind turbine for the U.S.” Jake Ward, UMaine’s vice president for innovation and economic development, said university experts recognized renewable energy was a leading growth area for composites, and the amount of wind available off the Gulf of Maine has the potential of being a useful resource.

LePage Points to Gabe’s Maine Maple Industry Study, Media Report

WMTW (Channel 8 in Portland) and the Associated Press reported on Maine Gov. Paul LePage citing a maple industry study by University of Maine economist Todd Gabe. Gabe found the state’s maple industry directly contributes nearly $28 million to the state’s economy every year. LePage said the industry has a “huge potential for additional job creation.” MPBN and Boston.com carried the AP report.

DMC’s Work with Damariscotta River Association Mentioned in Boothbay Register Article

The Darling Marine Center and its resources were mentioned in a Boothbay Register article about the Damariscotta River Association’s Estuarine Monitoring Program. The program offers community members a chance to get out on the water and become part of a data-gathering effort that will help determine the health of the estuary. Water samples collected during the program are taken from seven locations beginning at the DMC. The salinity, temperature and other data from the samples are then entered into a DRA database at the DMC. “We’re grateful to the Darling Marine Center for their expert partnership and continued technical consultation on this project,” said DRA Executive Director Steven Hufnagel.


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UMaine News
The University of Maine
Orono, Maine 04469
207.581.1110
A Member of the University of Maine System