Archive for the ‘Climate Change’ Category

UMaine Grad Student’s Sap Research Featured in Huffington Post

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014

The Huffington Post reported on maple syrup research being conducted by Jenny Shrum, a Ph.D. candidate in the ecology and environmental sciences graduate program in the University of Maine School of Biology and Ecology. Shrum is researching the biophysical relationships between weather and sap flow. Her goal is to better understand what drives flow and how expected trends in climate may affect the processes and harvesters in the future. Shrum said she’s also trying to understand the links between people’s relationship with their land, where they get their information from, how they perceive climate change, and their motivation for harvesting. “I’m trying to piece together how those four things are related. I think that also plays into whether people will want to collect maple syrup in the future, and which people,” she said.

Morning Sentinel, Kennebec Journal Cover Maine Water & Sustainability Conference

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

The Morning Sentinel and Kennebec Journal reported on the Maine Water & Sustainability Conference held at the Augusta Civic Center and organized by the Senator George J. Mitchell Center at the University of Maine. Several hundred people who work with or are interested in water resources and environmental sustainability, such as water resource professionals, engineers and environmental advocates, attended the conference. Session topics included the effect of water withdrawals on water supply and quality, lake management strategies, Maine’s energy future, climate-related trends, safe beaches and shellfish beds, and management approaches for sustainable urban streams.

Free Press Advances Training Sessions to Help with Climate Research

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

The Free Press reported the University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Maine Sea Grant will offer free training sessions for Signs of the Seasons, a program for volunteers to contribute local plant and animal life-cycle data for climate change research. Sessions are open to all interested volunteers, and registration is required. Sessions in the midcoast area will be held March 22 in Newcastle, March 25 in Belfast and April 5 in Boothbay.

Kennebec Journal, Morning Sentinel Advance Maine Water & Sustainability Conference

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014

The Kennebec Journal and Morning Sentinel previewed the Maine Water & Sustainability Conference to be held April 1 at the Augusta Civic Center. The conference, organized by the Senator George J. Mitchell Center at the University of Maine, will focus on the future of energy, clean water and safe beaches and shellfish beds. The annual event, founded in 1994 as the Maine Water Conference, was renamed the Maine Water & Sustainability Conference to reflect the addition of sustainability science research. The conference has become one of the largest environmentally related conferences in Maine attracting more than 350 attendees each year.

Maine’s Energy Future, Safe Beaches, Clean Water Focus of Conference

Tuesday, March 25th, 2014

The Senator George J. Mitchell Center at the University of Maine invites the public to attend a series of informative sessions on Maine water and sustainability issues from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 1 at the Augusta Civic Center.

The Maine Water & Sustainability Conference will include several sessions on sustainability science research in Maine, as well as sessions with a joint focus on water resources and sustainability.

The Maine Water Conference was founded in 1994 by the Senator George J. Mitchell Center at the University of Maine as an annual forum for water resource professionals, researchers, consultants, citizens, students, regulators and planners to exchange information and present new findings on water resource issues in Maine. The conference has grown to become one of the largest environmentally related conferences in Maine attracting more than 350 attendees each year. The Maine Water Conference Steering Committee is made up of key water resource stakeholders from across the state.

Cost to attend is $55. More information, including how to register and session times, is online.

Exhibit, films highlight ‘Human Dimensions of Climate Change’

Wednesday, March 19th, 2014

The Fogler Library at the University of Maine will display a “Human Dimensions of Climate Change” exhibit in late March and early April. The exhibit, in Fogler’s first floor hallway, highlights a selection of the library’s books, government documents and films that emphasize potential impacts of climate change on populations throughout the world.

The exhibit corresponds with the “Human Dimensions of Climate Change” film series. Upcoming films, which are shown in Fogler’s CETA room, include “Climate Refugees” at 6 p.m. March 25 and “There Once Was an Island” at 6 p.m. April 1.

Paul Mayewski, director of the Climate Change Institute, will facilitate discussion following “Climate Refugees”. Discussion after “There Once Was an Island” will feature Jim Roscoe, professor of anthropology.

For additional information, visit library.umaine.edu/displays/HumansClimate.htm or contact Jen Bonnet, jennifer.l.bonnet@maine.edu, 207.581.3611.

Climate Change Institute Professors Remember Research Associate Charles Porter in BDN Article

Thursday, March 6th, 2014

The Bangor Daily News reported Charles Porter, a research associate for the University of Maine’s Climate Change Institute and well-known mountain climber, passed away Feb. 23, 2014 at the age of 63. Paul Mayewski, director and distinguished professor of the Climate Change Institute, and Brenda Hall, a professor in the institute and UMaine’s School of Earth and Climate Sciences, shared their memories of Porter with the BDN. Mayewski said, “Charlie had a very rare ability and a staunch drive to understand as much as he could about the physical, chemical, biological and socio-cultural aspects of some of Earth’s most remote places.” Hall called Porter a “one-of-a-kind person” who was always up for an adventure.

UMaine Student Quoted in MPBN Article on Fossil Fuel Divestment Effort

Friday, February 28th, 2014

Sabrina Vivian, a third-year ecology and environmental science major at the University of Maine, was quoted in the Maine Public Broadcasting Network report titled “UMaine students press again for fossil fuel divestment.” Vivian was one of several students in the University of Maine System group Divest Maine that met with the UMaine Trustees Investment Committee to urge the system to stop investing endowment funds in the coal, oil and natural gas industries. Vivian told the committee “people have great power and can have immense impacts on the environment.” She urged the officials to consider creating a timeline for divesting funds from the top fossil fuel companies that are currently being supported. Vivian is a member of UMaine’s Green Team, a student organization that supports sustainable and environmentally friendly efforts on campus.

WABI, WVII Interview Grad Student About Sap Research

Friday, February 21st, 2014

WABI (Channel 5) and WVII (Channel 7) interviewed Jenny Shrum, a Ph.D. candidate in the ecology and environmental sciences graduate program in the University of Maine School of Biology and Ecology. Shrum is researching the biophysical relationships between weather and sap flow. Her goal is to better understand what drives flow and how expected trends in climate may affect the processes and harvesters in the future. Shrum showed the reporters two of her research sites where she is tapping and has set up weather stations. The Weekly also carried a report on Shrum’s research.

NECN Interviews Jacobson About Environmental Signs of Change

Wednesday, February 19th, 2014

NECN spoke with George Jacobson, Maine’s state climatologist and professor emeritus of biology, ecology and climate change at the University of Maine, about environmental and species changes seen in Maine. The report states scientists at UMaine’s Climate Change Institute say weather is different from climate and evidence points to a warming planet. Jacobson said the news “isn’t all good, it isn’t all bad; it’s change.” He added it’s important for researchers to work together to prepare for predicted trends.