Research

Mainebiz reports on DMC testing of technique to determine lobster’s age

Mainebiz reported researchers at the University of Maine Darling Marine Center in Walpole have been testing a new technique for figuring out the age of lobsters. Currently, a lobster’s age is estimated by size, but it’s a rough estimate because a lobster’s growth rate is affected by ocean conditions. Not knowing a lobster’s age is […]

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Adapt and overcome

Read transcript Elisabeth Kilroy, a second-year Ph.D. student in the University of Maine’s Graduate School of Biomedical Science and Engineering, shares her research in muscular dystrophy and what inspires her work. To Kilroy, the science is personal. Read the full UMaine Today article online.

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Greenland

Biogeochemical links across Greenland key to understanding Arctic

The Kangerlussuaq region of southwest Greenland is a 3,728-square-mile corridor stretching from the ice sheet to the Labrador Sea. In this area near the top of the world, landscape and ecosystem diversity abounds. Flora and fauna range from microbes in the ice sheet to large herbivores — caribou and musk oxen — living on the […]

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Press Herald publishes feature on Hall, glacier research

The Portland Press Herald published a feature article on Brenda Hall, a glacial geology professor at the University of Maine, as part of its “Meet” series. The Press Herald interviewed Hall about “her journey from growing up in Standish to being a globe-trotting expert on glacial geology and the stability of ice sheets.” Hall, a […]

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American lobster

DMC researchers test technique to determine lobster’s age

Research professor Rick Wahle and graduate student Carl Huntsberger are testing a technique at the University of Maine Darling Marine Center to determine the age of lobsters. Unlike fish, mollusks and trees, Wahle says lobsters and other crustaceans molt — or cast off their skeletons thereby discarding external signs of growth. That means a lobster’s […]

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2017 UMaine Student Symposium collecting submissions

Abstract submissions for the 2017 University of Maine Student Symposium on April 24 are now being accepted. The UMaine Student Symposium, a campuswide celebration of achievement in student research and creative activity, will be held at the Cross Insurance Center in Bangor from 8 a.m.–6 p.m. The event, which is free and open to the […]

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Wahle welcomes world to spring lobster conference in Portland

University of Maine marine scientist Rick Wahle is co-chairing a June conference in Portland, Maine focused on the impact of the changing ocean environment and the global economy on the biology and business of lobsters. About 200 biologists, oceanographers, industry members and fishery managers from more than a dozen countries are expected to attend the […]

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Former Darling Marine Center researcher leads phytoplankton expedition in Pacific

Ivona Cetinić, a former researcher at the University of Maine’s Darling Marine Center, set off Jan. 26 from Hawaii on a 27-day expedition to study the health of phytoplankton populations in the Pacific Ocean. Cetinić, an oceanographer with NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center and the Universities Space Research Association (USRA), is working on board the […]

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Change in schedule for campus presentations by VPR/Graduate School dean finalists

Editor’s note: This post was updated Wednesday, Feb. 15. Four finalists for the Vice President for Research and Dean of the Graduate School will be on campus Feb. 15–24. Public presentations on the topic, “Vision of Research and Graduate Study in a 21st-Century Land Grant University,” will be followed by question-and-answer sessions, and receptions. The […]

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UMaine study cited in WLBZ report on winter car crashes

A 2010 University of Maine study was cited in a WLBZ (Channel 2) report about driving in snowy conditions. The study found accidents are more likely to happen when there are less than four inches of snow on the ground, with the most happening when there are less than two inches. Experts said one to […]

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