Archive for the ‘Museums’ Category

UMaine Museum of Art Mentioned in Press Herald Article on John Marin Paintings, Drawings

Friday, February 21st, 2014

The University of Maine Museum of Art was mentioned in a Portland Press Herald article about the Arkansas Arts Center in Little Rock announcing it received 290 watercolors and drawings by the modernist John Marin, who spent much of his life and career in Maine. The gift was courtesy of Marin’s daughter-in-law Norma B. Marin, who lives in New York and Portland and administers his estate. Maine museums have more than 100 works of art by Marin. The University of Maine Museum of Art in Bangor has 26 of those pieces.

Hudson Museum Artifact Could Have Inspired NFL Team’s Logo, Weekly Reports

Wednesday, February 19th, 2014

The Weekly carried a report about an artifact at the University of Maine’s Hudson Museum that may have inspired the logo design of the Super Bowl champion Seattle Seahawks. The wooden Northwest Coast transformation mask depicts a bird of prey when closed and reveals a painted depiction of a human face when opened. The artifact is part of the William P. Palmer III collection and is on display at the museum. A few days before Super Bowl XLVIII, Robin K. Wright, curator of Native American art and director of the Bill Holm Center at Burke Museum at the University of Washington, posted a blog “Searching for what inspired the Seattle Seahawks logo.” The mask Wright describes in her blog is believed to be the same mask displayed at the Hudson Museum.

Hudson Museum Artifact May Have Been Motivation for Seattle Seahawks Logo

Friday, February 7th, 2014

The University of Maine’s Hudson Museum is home to an artifact that may have inspired the logo design of the Super Bowl champion Seattle Seahawks: a carved Northwest Coast transformation mask.

The wooden mask, which depicts a bird of prey when closed and reveals a painted depiction of a human face when opened, is part of the William P. Palmer III collection on display at the museum.

The brightly colored mask, which has mirrors for eyes, is 2 feet long when closed and 3 feet long open. Hudson Museum Director Gretchen Faulkner says it likely was carved from cedar in the late 19th or early 20th century.

Faulkner says Richard Emerick, the late UMaine anthropologist and founder of the Hudson Museum, told her years ago that the wooden mask was the inspiration for the Seahawks logo that was unveiled in 1975. But there was no corroborating information in the mask’s collection file linking it to the Seahawks.

Now, though, a possible link exists.

Robin K. Wright, curator of Native American art and director of the Bill Holm Center at Burke Museum at the University of Washington, attributes the mask to the Kwakwaka‘wakw (kwock-KWOCKY-wowk) — Indigenous people of the Pacific Northwest Coast.

A few days before Super Bowl XLVIII, Wright posted a blog “Searching for what inspired the Seattle Seahawks logo.”

The mask that Wright pictures in her blog as the likely motivation for the Seahawks design appeared in Robert Bruce Inverarity’s 1950 book, “Art of the Northwest Coast Indians.”

It’s believed to be the same mask displayed at the Hudson Museum, catalogue number HM5521.

In 1982, avid baseball fan William Palmer of Falmouth Foreside, Maine, bequeathed the mask, as well as other Northwest Coast art and an extraordinary collection of Pre-Colombian artifacts, to UMaine.

After the Seahawks Super Bowl win over the Denver Broncos on Sunday, Feb. 2, Faulkner told museum board member Isla Baldwin what Emerick had shared with her years ago about the mask being the inspiration for the Seattle football team’s original logo.

Baldwin discovered Wright’s blog while doing online research.

Contacted earlier this week, Wright says she’s thrilled to learn where the mask is housed. In a televised interview just prior to the Super Bowl, Wright said she expressed hope that the blog and TV interview might help unearth the location of the mask.

Masks are worn in Kwakwaka’wakw ceremonies that include singing, dancing and giving of gifts, Wright says, and often memorialize a deceased chief.

When the logo was unveiled in 1975, John Thompson, then-general manager of the Seahawks, was quoted saying that the logo designers referenced books about Northwest Coast art for inspiration. A call to the Seahawks was not returned by Friday morning.

Faulkner invites fans of art and athletics to visit the museum to see the piece; the museum is open Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Contact: Beth Staples, 207.581.3777

UMaine Museum of Art Offering Free Gallery Talk Feb. 12

Tuesday, February 4th, 2014

The University of Maine Museum of Art in downtown Bangor will offer ART@NOON, an informal gallery talk and tour with UMMA Director George Kinghorn at 12 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 12. Kinghorn will discuss the museum’s current exhibition “From Piranesi to Picasso: Master Prints from the Permanent Collection,” on display through March 22. ART@NOON gallery talks are free and open to the public.

UMaine Museum of Art Exhibitions Focus of Press Herald Article

Monday, February 3rd, 2014

The Portland Press Herald reported on the University of Maine Museum of Art’s winter exhibitions that will run through March 22. The exhibits, “From Piranesi to Picasso: Master Prints from the Permanent Collection,” Hannah Cole’s “Time’s Wife” and Kenny Cole’s “Parabellum (Prepare for War)” include art from a Maine local to famous artists such as Francisco Goya and Pablo Picasso.

Press Herald Reports on UMMA Exhibit Featuring Monroe Artist’s Work

Monday, January 20th, 2014

The Portland Press Herald reported on a current exhibition at the University of Maine Museum of Art that features work by Monroe, Maine, artist Kenny Cole. Cole’s “Parabellum,” an interactive painting installation that rewrites some Civil War history, is one of the museum’s three exhibits running January through March. George Kinghorn, UMMA director and curator, offered Cole a spot after visiting his studio and admiring his work and commitment. Kinghorn said he likes how Cole’s work is immersive and interactive.

WVII Advances UMaine Museum of Art’s Winter Exhibitions

Friday, January 17th, 2014

WVII (Channel 7) reported on the University of Maine Museum of Art’s winter exhibitions that will open to the public on Jan. 17 and run through March 22. The exhibits, “From Piranesi to Picasso: Master Prints from the Permanent Collection,” Hannah Cole’s “Time’s Wife” and Kenny Cole’s “Parabellum (Prepare for War)” include art from Maine locals to famous artists such as Francisco Goya and Pablo Picasso. George Kinghorn, the museum’s director and curator, said some of the works UMMA is lucky to own are also owned by museums such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

WLBZ Previews UMaine Museum of Art’s Winter Exhibitions

Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

WLBZ (Channel 2) reported on the University of Maine Museum of Art’s winter exhibitions that will open to the public on Jan. 17 and run through March 22. The exhibits, “From Piranesi to Picasso: Master Prints from the Permanent Collection,” Hannah Cole’s “Time’s Wife” and Kenny Cole’s “Parabellum (Prepare for War)” include art from Maine locals to famous artists such as Francisco Goya and Pablo Picasso.

UMaine Museum of Art Announces Winter Exhibitions

Tuesday, January 14th, 2014

The University of Maine Museum of Art has announced three winter exhibitions.

Hannah Cole’s “Time’s Wife”; Kenny Cole’s “Parabellum (Prepare for War)”; and “From Piranesi to Picasso: Master Prints from the Permanent Collection” will run from Jan. 17 to March 22 at the museum in downtown Bangor.

“From Piranesi to Picasso” will feature more than 60 prints from the museum’s permanent collection. Established in 1946, the collection contains original prints by internationally renowned artists.

Highlights of the selected works, which date from the 18th century to the late 1980s, include Giovanni Battista Piranesi’s etchings from 1748–1772 that document Rome’s architectural landmarks; Francisco Goya’s aquatint and etchings from “Los Caprichos;” and Pablo Picasso’s “Faun Unveiling a Woman,” considered to be one of the artist’s most significant graphic works.

Winslow Homer’s 1887 etching “Eight Bells,” John Marin’s 1910 etching “Chartres Cathedral,” and Edward Hopper’s “The Lonely House” from 1922 will also be featured in the exhibit that will demonstrate diverse printmaking processes such as etching, silkscreen, woodcut, lithograph, drypoint and engraving.

Museum admission in 2014 is free thanks to the Penobscot Financial Advisors. More information is available online or by calling Assistant Museum Coordinator Kathryn Jovanelli at 207.561.3350.

Village Soup Reports on UMMA Exhibit Featuring Monroe Artist’s Work

Monday, January 13th, 2014

Village Soup’s The Republican Journal reported one of the University of Maine Museum of Art’s January exhibitions will feature work by Monroe, Maine resident Kenny Cole. The exhibits will open to the public on Jan. 17 and run through March 22. The three exhibits are Kenny Cole’s “Parabellum (Prepare for War);” Hannah Cole’s “Time’s Wife;” and “From Piranesi to Picasso: Master Prints from the Permanent Collection.”