Archive for the ‘Hancock County’ Category

UMaine’s CCAR Assists in Development of Recirculating Aquaculture Technology

Monday, February 3rd, 2014

Chefs often go to the docks to select fresh catch to prepare their evening seafood dinners.

In the near future, area chefs and the public may routinely be getting fresh, sustainable fish from a Maine-based indoor fish farm.

A number of locals are working toward that future, including middle-school students, educators, marine scientists, businesspeople, funders, and a fisherman who helps run a cooperative. Participants involved in this cutting-edge indoor fish farming technology project will gather at Herring Gut Learning Center in Port Clyde on Thursday, Feb. 6.

Following are snapshots of the participating organizations:

School of Roots at the Herring Gut Learning Center, Port Clyde, Maine

The School of Roots, a student-run aquaponics business established in 2010, is managed by middle-school youth in RSU 13’s Alternative Education Program at the Herring Gut Learning Center. The students learn academic concepts while developing, marketing and selling products to grocers, restaurants and community members. They previously test-marketed and sold black sea bass produced by Acadia Harvest and are now premarketing Acadia Harvest’s California yellowtail. Feb. 6, the students will help harvest the fish; they plan to have them all sold within 48 hours of harvest.

For more information on the School of Roots, visit herringgut.org/schoolofroots.html?id=1.

For more information on Herring Gut Learning Center, visit herringgut.org.

Acadia Harvest Inc., Brunswick, Maine

Acadia Harvest was formed in early 2011 as RAS Corporation. Acadia Harvest (AHI) is working at the University of Maine’s Center for Cooperative Aquaculture Research in Franklin, Maine, to develop new technologies in land-based, indoor sustainable fish farming, known as recirculating aquaculture systems. Principals Chris Heinig (CEO), Tap Pryor (chief scientist) and Ed Robinson (chairman) have been growing and test marketing high-quality, nutritious, affordable fish, both California yellowtail and black sea bass. By 2016, they anticipate having their first commercial-scale production facility in Maine to initially produce 250 to 450 metric tons of fish annually. With a SBIR Phase I grant from the National Science Foundation, the company has experimented with marine worms and various forms of algae in the recirculating aquaculture system to achieve an environmentally friendly “zero-waste” facility. AHI has a purchase option on a parcel of land in Gouldsboro, on the site of a former naval facility at Corea. The construction of a first-phase production facility would involve a multi-million dollar investment and the creation of 10–15 new jobs for the area.

University of Maine’s Center for Cooperative Aquaculture Research, Franklin, Maine

UMaine’s Center for Cooperative Aquaculture Research, directed by Nick Brown, is a business incubation facility and a center for applied aquaculture research, development and demonstration. CCAR is assisting Acadia Harvest in its development of recirculating aquaculture technology by providing sophisticated aquaculture business incubation facilities, recirculation technology and marine research expertise. CCAR also will provide juvenile fish from its state-of-the-art hatchery for Acadia Harvest.

For more information about UMaine’s CCAR, visit www.ccar.um.maine.edu/index.html.

Port Clyde Fresh Catch: A Maine Fishermen’s Cooperative, Port Clyde, Maine

Port Clyde Fresh Catch is the country’s first community-supported fishery. It’s part of a movement seeking to do for small-scale local fishermen what community-supported agriculture does for farmers. On Feb. 6, Glen Libby and the Port Clyde team will process the California yellowtail grown by Acadia Harvest.

For more information about Port Clyde Fresh Catch, visit portclydefreshcatch.com.

Both Maine Technology Institute and Coastal Enterprises, Inc. have provided funding that has been instrumental in Acadia Harvest’s development of indoor fish farming technology.

Maine Technology Institute (MTI), Brunswick, Maine

The Maine Technology Institute is a private nonprofit organization chartered by the state to “invest in innovation” in seven key sectors. MTI funds entrepreneurs, growing businesses and research institutions engaged in research and development of innovative technologies in Aquaculture & Marine, Agriculture & Forestry, Biotechnology, Precision Manufacturing, Advanced Composites, Information Technology and Environmental Technology. In addition to a competitive grant and loan program, MTI also makes equity investments in promising technologies. Since its founding in 1999, MTI has invested more than $178 million in the Maine economy, bringing in more than $250 million of additional investment to Maine, and creating high-quality jobs and long-term value for the state.

For more information about MTI, visit mainetechnology.org.

Coastal Enterprises, Inc. (CEI), Wiscasset, Maine

CEI, a 501(c)(3) private, nonprofit Community Development Corporation (CDC) and Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI), is among the leading rural finance entities in the Northeast. Founded in 1977, and headquartered in Maine, CEI has provided $1.05 billion in loans and investments, and business and housing counseling services to more than 43,082 people, helping to create economically and environmentally healthy communities in New England, upstate New York, and throughout rural America.

For more information about CEI, visit ceimaine.org.

Contact: Beth Staples, 207.581.3777

Innovate for Maine Internship Program Accepting Applications

Tuesday, January 28th, 2014

The University of Maine’s Foster Center for Student Innovation is seeking motivated, innovative Maine college students and Maine companies that want to make a difference for the state through the Blackstone Accelerates Growth (BxG) Innovate for Maine Fellows program, supported by the Blackstone Charitable Foundation.

The BxG Innovate for Maine Fellows program connects the best and brightest Maine college students with the state’s most exciting, growing companies as a way to grow and create jobs in Maine through innovation and entrepreneurship. The program, which is now accepting applications, offers paid internships that place students with companies to receive training in innovation and entrepreneurship, and real-world job experience. Other benefits include potential academic credit and networking opportunities with Maine businesses and other students.

Applications are also available for Maine companies looking for summer interns. Trained innovation experts guide and mentor both the student and the company for the duration of the project.

The application deadline for both fellows and companies is March 1, 2014. More information and applications for the Innovate for Maine program are online.

Camire Quoted in Press Herald Article on Exclusion of Potatoes from Program

Monday, January 27th, 2014

Mary Ellen Camire, a professor of food science and human nutrition at the University of Maine, spoke to the Portland Press Herald for an article about the potato industry and supporters in Congress pushing to scrap a policy that prevents women from buying potatoes with vouchers they get through the Women, Infants and Children (WIC) nutrition program. Camire, who has researched the nutritional value of and consumers’ attitudes about potatoes, said potatoes are inexpensive, keep for long periods, are low in sodium and contain more protein and fiber than many other vegetables. She said she supports increasing the availability of potatoes to families.

Rice Talks to BDN for Articles on Maine Mills

Monday, January 27th, 2014

Robert Rice, a professor of wood science at the University of Maine, was interviewed by the Bangor Daily News for two articles about mills in Maine. Rice was quoted in articles about the Verso-NewPage merger and the East Millinocket mill’s production shutdown. Rice said he believes the coated paper market’s struggles have been driven by the recession, and the market will stabilize as the economy recovers. Michael Bilodeau, associate director of the University of Maine Forest Bioproducts Research Institute, also spoke to the BDN about the Verso-NewPage merger.

Grad Student to Conduct Vegetable Study

Friday, January 24th, 2014

Is a purple potato more appealing than a white one?

Kelly Koss, a University of Maine student pursuing a master’s degree in food science and human nutrition, plans to find out.

Since many children in the United States do not eat the recommended daily amount of vegetables, Koss has decided to test whether they are more apt to eat a veggie that has a novel, bright color. Koss is seeking 100 children from 8 to 10 years of age to take part in a 50-minute study during February vacation. Participating children will be asked to sample two cooked potatoes (one purple, one white), as well as raw cauliflower (orange and white) and raw carrots (yellow and orange), then answer several questions.

The study will be conducted in the Consumer Testing Center in Hitchner Hall on the UMaine campus. Volunteers who complete the study will earn $10. Mary Ellen Camire, professor of food science and human nutrition in the School of Food and Agriculture, is Koss’ adviser.

All of the vegetables are grown naturally and are not artificially colored, Koss says. Children who are allergic to cooked potatoes, raw cauliflower, raw carrots, dairy, eggs or ranch dressing are not permitted to participate. If interested, and for more information, contact Koss at 207.581.1733 or kelly.koss@umit.maine.edu.

WABI Talks With 7th-Grader Committed to UMaine

Friday, January 24th, 2014

WABI (Channel 5) interviewed Oliver Wahlstrom, a seventh-grader who plays varsity ice hockey at North Yarmouth Academy and who earlier this year verbally committed to attend the University of Maine and play hockey, in 2019.

Wahlstrom, 13, told WABI that he wants to enroll at UMaine because he loves the school, is not a city guy and that the Black Bear coaching staff is “unbelievable.”

BDN Previews Inaugural Event at Renovated Field House

Friday, January 24th, 2014

The Bangor Daily News wrote about Saturday morning’s scheduled opening of the renovated University of Maine New Balance Field House.

The public will get its first look at the nearly $5 million in renovations at Saturday’s Penobscot Valley Conference-Eastern Maine Indoor Track League.

WVII Interviews Sophomore About 4K for Cancer

Friday, January 24th, 2014

WVII (Channel 7) talked with University of Maine sophomore Matt Dexter about his summer plans — taking part in the 4K for Cancer.

For 42 days, Dexter and 33 other college students will team up to complete a 4,000-mile team run from San Francisco, Calif. to Baltimore, Md. Their goals are to raise awareness of cancer and raise money for cancer research.

“It’s important to me because my mother passed away from cancer in 2008. I realized I wasn’t alone and there’s a lot of people out there who are affected by this terrible, terrible disease,” says Dexter, who is majoring in psychology.

Along the way, Dexter and his teammates will visit hospitals and give college scholarships to young adults fighting cancer.

UMaine Sophomore on Track With 4K for Cancer

Thursday, January 23rd, 2014

Matthew Dexter was 13 when his mother, Christine died of stomach cancer. Running, he says, eventually helped him get his life back on track.

The University of Maine sophomore is now planning to run to help others. This summer, for 42 days, Dexter will jog from sea to shining sea to spread awareness about cancer and raise money for research and for young cancer survivors.

Dexter and 33 other college students from around the country will team up to log 4,000 miles in the second annual Ulman Cancer Foundation’s 4K for Cancer, a running relay from San Francisco, Calif. to Baltimore, Md.

The psychology major from Acton, Mass. will begin the trek June 15 near the Golden Gate Bridge. Each member of the relay team will run six to 10 miles a day, and finish the fund-raising journey July 26 on Federal Hill in the Charm City.

Dexter is about $1,000 shy of raising his goal of $5,000. Last year, runners and bikers taking part in the annual event contributed almost $775,000 to the Ulman Cancer Foundation’s 4K for Cancer fund.

The motto for the relay is “Change Lives” and that’s what Dexter has his sights set on doing. “I want to change at least one person’s life,” he says.

On the 42-day journey, he’ll have a number of opportunities to do so; he says he’s eager to visit patients, hand out chemo packs (comfort items for patients undergoing chemotherapy) and deliver college scholarships to young adults fighting cancer.

Dexter plans to blog and post photos throughout the trek so friends and family can vicariously experience highlights along the way.

4K for Cancer is a program of the Ulman Cancer Fund for Young Adults that Doug Ulman started in 1997. Ulman was 19 and about to begin his sophomore year at Brown University when he was first diagnosed with cancer. He formed the nonprofit organization to enhance “lives by supporting, educating and connecting young adults, and their loved ones, affected by cancer.”

Ulman, a former soccer player for the Division I Brown Bears, is now a three-time cancer survivor and is president and CEO of LIVESTRONG Foundation.

Striving to make a positive difference runs in Dexter’s family as well. His father, Jim participates in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a bike-a-thon in Massachusetts that raises money for cancer research and treatment at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Dexter, who completed an ultra marathon this past fall in New Hampshire, was considering how he could contribute when he spied an ad for 4K for Cancer on Facebook.

To learn more, to contribute and to read his blog during the trek, visit 4kforcancer.org/profiles/matt-dexter.

Contact: Beth Staples, 207.581.3777

Cosgrove Among Maine Sports Hall of Fame Inductees, Media Report

Wednesday, January 22nd, 2014

The Bangor Daily News and The Maine Edge reported Jack Cosgrove, head coach of the University of Maine football team, is one of nine people to be inducted into the Maine Sports Hall of Fame in May at its 39th annual awards banquet. Other inductees include Joseph L. Ferris, who pitched for UMaine in the 1964 College World Series, and Edward J. Flaherty, an All-American performer at UMaine in 1975.