Student News

College of Education and Human Development again makes U.S. News & World Report list of top online grad programs

U.S. News & World Report has again recognized the University of Maine College of Education and Human Development as having one of the best online graduate programs for education in the country. UMaine offers graduate education degrees at the certificate, master’s, education specialist and doctoral level, with many online options. The graduate program in Curriculum, Assessment and Instruction recently […]

Read more

Muscular dystrophy research aims to understand muscle degeneration

Using bioinformatics to analyze muscular dystrophy. Zebrafish share 70 percent of genes with humans, making them ideal to study muscular dystrophy. Benjamin King, assistant professor for bioinformatics, has teamed up with Clarissa Henry, associate professor of biological sciences, to study muscular dystrophy, a progressive genetic disorder that affects muscles in the human body. They have developed […]

Read more

UMaine turning water into wine?

This article was originally written by Steve Collins for the Sun Journal. ORONO — Imagine it’s New Year’s Eve in, say, 2050. You’re ready to attend a glamorous, glitzy, high-class party to usher in the new year. So you put on your grimy old sweats, pour a pitcher of water, pile some soy patties on […]

Read more

Picture of Linda standing by brick campus building

Social media spotlight: Linda Archambault

December 17, 2018 Student profile Hometown: Bristol, Maine Linda Archambault, a biochemistry Ph.D. candidate works in UMaine associate professor of microbiology Rob Wheeler’s lab. Last summer, she was selected as a teaching assistant for an internationally recognized practical course on fungal infectious diseases at the Marine Biological Laboratory and received the 2018–19 Janet Waldron Doctoral […]

Read more

DDT in Alaska meltwater poses cancer risk for people who eat lots of fish

Children in Alaska whose diet includes a lot of fish from rivers fed by the Eastern Alaska Mountain Range may have a long-term elevated risk for cancer because of insecticides—including DDT—in the meltwater. Even with low levels of organochlorine pollutants (OCPs) in glacial meltwater, the risk of cancer for youth and adults who rely on […]

Read more

Innovative research uses nanocellulose to heal peripheral nerve injury

Nicklaus Carter has a lot of experience with tubes and pipes from his days working in construction. Now, he creates a different kind of pipe – a nanocellulose conduit – for use in the medical field. Carter, from Franklin, Maine, is a doctoral student in the Graduate School of Biomedical Science and Engineering. His love […]

Read more

CORE: a new service management program for research labs and equipment

Developing CORE for easier access to major research equipment while managing their long-term sustainability. Coordinated Operating Research Entities (CORE) is a new initiative by the Office of the Vice President for Research and Dean of the Graduate School. CORE joins most UMaine research labs by working with the operators of the equipment across campus. It uses […]

Read more