People

Faculty and Researchers

Hal Borns

Professor Emeritus

Hal Borns

George Denton

Professor

George Denton


Brenda Hall

Professor

Brenda Hall

Email: brendah@maine.edu
Office: Bryand Global Sciences Center 311
Phone: 207-581-2191

 

 

 

My interests include the origin of ice ages and abrupt climate change and the behavior of ice sheets. Typically, I combine intensive glacial geologic field work with isotopic analyses to obtain chronologies of past glacial and climate fluctuations.

 

View her Climate Change Institute and Earth and Climate Sciences webpages.


Aaron Putnam

Assistant Professor

Aaron Putnam

Email: aaron.putnam@maine.edu
Office: Bryand Global Sciences Center 224
Phone: 207-581-2152

 

 

I am interested in the late-Quaternary history of glaciers and climate, specifically during and since the last ice age.  I use 10Be surface-exposure dating and radiocarbon dating to determine the age of glacial landforms that mark the extents of former glaciers.  From this information we can quantify regional changes in past atmospheric temperatures using snowline reconstructions and glaciological modeling.  Field areas include: Southern Alps, New Zealand; Patagonian Andes; Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada, western USA; Tien Shan and Tarim Basin, Xinjiang, China; Scottish Highlands.  Previous field projects have involved fieldwork in northern Maine, northern Alaska, the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, and the southern Transantarctic Mountains, Antarctica.

View his CCI and ERS webpages.


Gordon Bromley

Research Assistant Professor

Gordon Bromley

Email: gordon.r.bromley1@maine.edu
Office: Bryand Global Sciences Center 221
Phone: 207-404-6572

 

 

 

My research interests include the causes of and mechanisms driving global climate change, as well as the ramifications of anthropogenic forcing for ice-sheet stability, sea level, and water resources. I am also fascinated by relationships between environmental change and human land use, particularly in high-altitude regions of South America. I employ a range of geomorphologic and geochemical techniques in my work, including surface-exposure dating (3He and 10Be), with which I can reconstruct past periods of climate variability. Ultimately, these data provide valuable insight into how our climate system works on timescales ranging from centuries to millennia. Current field areas include Peru, Colombia, Scotland, Antarctica, Greenland, and New England.

View his CCI and ERS webpages.


Kat Allen

Research Associate

Kat Allen

Office: Bryand Global Sciences Center 221
Email: katherine.a.allen@maine.edu

 

 

I study the causes and consequences of climate change from a marine perspective.  The ocean plays a key role in Earth’s climate due to its ability to store and release large amounts of heat and carbon. My research involves reconstructing past seawater properties (e.g., pH, carbonate ion, temperature) from fossil carbonates.  Such paleoceanographic records provide insight into past carbon cycling and the driving mechanisms of ice age cycles. I also grow live organisms in culture experiments in order to calibrate new paleo-proxies. My ultimate aims are to understand: 1) how Earth’s climate will respond to rising atmospheric CO2, and 2) how marine organisms and ecosystems will respond to the accompanying ocean acidification.

View her ERS webpage.


Graduate Students

Peter Strand

PhD Student

Peter Strand

Email: peter.strand@maine.edu
Office: Bryand Global Sciences Center 228

 

 

I am a PhD student working under the guidance of Aaron Putnam and George Denton. My research involves reconstructing past glacial chronologies and climate variability using 10Be surface-exposure dating and radiocarbon dating. My current project is a comparison of the timing and structure of the Last Glacial Maximum period in Northern and Southern Hemisphere mid-latitudes. I am also interested in the roles played by changing oceanic and atmospheric circulations in the climate system. Field areas include: Mongolian Altai; Southern Alps, New Zealand; Northern Andes, Peru; Dry Valleys, Antarctica.


Jill Pelto

Masters Student

Email: jill.pelto@maine.edu
Office: Bryand Global Sciences Center 313

 

 

My research as a Masters student focuses on late Quaternary history of the Antarctic Ice Sheet, focusing on several glaciers in the southern Transantarctic Mountains. My study intends to further our understanding of the Antarctic’s sensitivity to climate change by reconstructing the timing and rate of its retreat after the warming that occurred at the end of the last ice age.

Visit Jill’s website to view her climate change artwork and that created during her field excursions.


Mariah Radue

Masters Student

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Email: mariah.radue@maine.edu
Office: Bryand Global Sciences Center 228

 

 

 

My research focuses on the late Quaternary history of mountain glaciers in the Mongolian Altai. Understanding the deglaciation of the Potanin Glacier from the Last Glacial Maximum to its pre-Industrial Age position helps us determine the rate at which central Asia responded to the abrupt shift from glacial to interglacial climate. The Mongolian Altai offer an ideal place to test abrupt climate changes because mountain glaciers are primarily influenced by summer temperature. In addition, these glaciers lie in the heart of Asia, Earth’s largest continent, where the climate responds directly to changes in radiative forcing. I am working on this project with Dr. Aaron Putnam and Peter Strand as a part of my Master’s. I use Beryllium-10 surface exposure dating in tandem with glacial geomorphic mapping by drone to create a glacial chronology of the Potanin Glacier Valley.

View her CCI webpage.


Allie Balter

Masters Student

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Email: alexandra.balter@maine.edu
Office: Bryand Global Sciences Center 313

 

 

 

I am a master’s student working under the guidance of Dr. Gordon Bromley. My research aims to delineate the extent of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) during the Pliocene, a period ~5 to 2.5 million years ago when temperatures were significantly warmer than today. It has been hypothesized that the projected global warming due to human activities may be enough to melt the EAIS catastrophically, which would have profound implications for global sea level rise. In order to determine the possibility of ice sheet collapse, we must understand how the ice sheet has responded to previous periods of warming, such as the Pliocene. We will determine past configurations of the EAIS in the vicinity of Beardmore and Shackleton glaciers using 3He, 21Ne, and 10Be dating, as well as detailed geomorphic mapping. The Pliocene epoch provides an analog for our warming future, and this project will enhance our understanding of how the East Antarctic Ice Sheet will respond to that warming.


Cassie Stirpe

Masters Student

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Email: cassandre.stirpe@maine.edu
Office: Bryand Global Science Center 204

 

 

 

I am a Masters student working with Kat Allen, studying Pleistocene paleoclimate and paleoceanography. My research focuses on deepwater circulation and stratification in the southwestern Pacific around the Last Glacial Maximum. Using sediment cores from New Zealand’s Bay of Plenty, I will be analyzing chemical proxies (∂18O and Mg/Ca) from foraminiferal calcite to study ocean circulation and its links to the global carbon cycle and climate change. As a large carbon reservoir, the ocean plays a key role in glacial/interglacial cycles, but there are many regions where ocean circulation remains poorly studied. The cores from the Bay of Plenty will provide new information on interactions between Southern and Pacific deep waters through time