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Course Descriptions

Click on course designator and number below for description of each course.

To register for these courses, please call 581-3143, or register online at:

http://dll.umaine.edu/register/


100-300 level courses are undergraduate; 400 level may be used for undergraduate or graduate level; 500-600 are graduate level courses

ANT 422 – Folklore of Maine and the Maritimes

ANT 425 – Recorded Interviewing Techniques and Methods

ANT 426 – Native American Folklore

ARH 361 – Art, Maine, and a Sense of Place

ENG 244 – Writers of Maine

ENG 429 – Maine Women Writers

ERS 102 – Environmental Geology of Maine

FAS 101 – Introduction to Franco-American Studies

FAS 230 / WST 235 - Franco American Women’s Experience

FTY 111 – Forests Through time

GEO 210 – Geography of Maine

HTY 210 – Maine History

HTY 211 – Maine and the Sea

HTY 315 – Shipwreck Sites: Archaeological and Historical Investigations

HTY 398 – Revolution in Maine

INT 491 / WST 401 / MES 520 – A Midwife’s Tale and the Social Web

LIB 500 – Exploring Interdisciplinarity (required for all MALS students)

LIB 500 / MES 498 – A Sense of Place: Maine and Regonal Idenity (required for all Maine Studies Graduate students)

MES 101 - Introduction to Maine Studies (required for the Maine Studies minor and certificate)

MES 201 – The Maine Coast (required for the Maine Studies minor and certificate)

MES 301 - Rachel Carson, Maine, and the Environment

MES 498 / 520 – Doing Nearby History and Folklore in the Classroom

MES 498 – Topics in Maine Studies

MES 520 – Advanced Topics in Maine Studies

MES 530 – Maine Politics and Public Policy

MES 598 – Directed Study in Maine Studies

NAS 102 – Introduction to Wabanaki Culture, History, and Current Issues

NAS 401 – Teaching Maine Indian History and Culture

POS 203 – American State and Local Government

WST 201 – Maine Women


ANT 422 – Folklore of Maine and the Maritimes This course provides a survey of the genres of folklore found in the major linguistic traditions (English, French, Native American) of the Northeast, with an emphasis on Maine. Special attention is given to the occupational traditions of farming, fishing, and lumbering.

ANT 425 – Recorded Interviewing Techniques and Methods This course will introduce students to the theory and methodology of ethnographic and oral history fieldwork as it is practiced by social scientists and humanities researchers.  Students will learn to prepare research plans, develop questions, and conduct and record interviews. They will learn how to navigate the essential practices of permissions, understand the concepts of copyright of research materials as it pertains to interviews, and fulfill the requirements of the Institutional Review Board for the Protection of Human Subjects (IRB) – Required Training at the University of Maine.  Students will learn about the practices of archiving research materials and how to interpret and incorporate interview research into a research paper or documentary.  May be taken for graduate credit.   An online course offered by the University of Maine through Continuing and Distance Education with monthly meetings in class or via compressed video. 3 credits

ANT 426 – Native American Folklore This course provides an overview of the anthropological scholarship of Native American folklore, with an emphasis on the Northeastern U.S. and Maritime Provinces of Canada. We will survey the various genres of traditional expressive culture with an emphasis on mythology and storytelling. The “borrowing” of folk tales and motifs from one culture to another will be explored. Students conduct research and present their findings to the class. Satisfies the General Education Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirement.

ARH 361 – Art, Maine, and a Sense of Place This course is available to undergraduates. This interdisciplinary course will focus on Maine’s rich art history, from Wabanaki art to the well-known landscape artists of the coast and Mt. Katahdin, to the contemporary arts in Maine. Students will develop final projects according to their interests, including the arts and the Maine economy, museum studies, art gallery management, Maine material history, and multi-culturalism and the arts in Maine.

ENG 244 – Writers of Maine Almost any literature worth reading is energized by some kind of overt or subtle tension, and the writings about Maine that we will read and discuss are no exception. Consider, for example, the constant battle between the people and the weather, the land, and sea for economic or even physical survival. Consider as well the effects of such ongoing struggles on the relationships among Maine people -husbands and wives, parents and children, neighbors and those from away. Good writers may show us how such tensions can be successfully resolved or they may simply make us aware of the complexity of the tensions, but they seldom settle for leaving us with the kind of picture of Maine that we could find on a postcard or a tourist brochure. Even those pieces that present Maine life as idyllic are appealing in part because we know that most of the time life isn’t like that — even in Maine. Most of the readings in this course will come from the anthology Maine Speaks: An Anthology of Maine Literature, supplemented by two or three other books, including at least one novel. In addition, we will look at some examples of Maine art, music, and film to see how they enrich our understanding of the state and its people. Satisfies the General Education Western Cultural Traditions, Artistic and Creative Expression, and Ethics Requirements.

ENG 429 – Maine Women Writers This course is an exploration of the themes, issues, and approaches found in the novels, memoirs, and poetry of Maine’s women writers as they relate to capturing a sense of place. We will try to deduce from these readings what “place” means to these writers, what aspects of lace are common to their works and what aspects are unique, and even how women’s sense of place differs from men’s. This course calls for extensive reading, at least weekly participation in online discussions, and the writing of two or three short analytical papers, a book review, and a final synthesis paper. Supplemental readings, videos, and audio lectures will be available online. Because the sharing of ideas, reactions and opinions are important to this course, students will be expected to observe the schedule for assignments.

ERS 102 – Environmental Geology of Maine After developing an understanding of rocks, minerals and geologic time, the course explores the modern distribution of natural geologic resources that limit human activity and influence political and economic decision-making. Examines the impact of humans on the physical and chemical environment and subsequent impact on the biosphere, and geologic hazards. Ends with a detailed look at the terrestrial and marine geologic records related to climate change and explores hypotheses related to the mechanisms and rates of climate change. The emphasis in the course is on the Maine geologic environment. Satisfies the General Education Labortory in the Basic or Applied Sciences, and Population and the Environment Requirements.

FAS 101 – Introduction to Franco-American Studies This course introduces the French cultures of North America, emphasizing the people of Maine and the Northeast region. It examines European origins and later migrations, the impact of gender and class, the social significance of language, individual and collective expression, the effects of assimilation, and the challenges faced today. Satisfies the General Education Social Context and Institutions, and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

FAS 230 / WST 235 – Franco American Women’s Experience Examines the immigration experience and subsequent lifestyles of the present-day Franco American women and their cultural ancestors. Studying the immigration of these women from France to New France, Canada and across the border into the U.S., students will learn about the historical and cultural implications of immigration for these women and the definition they imparted to the culture. Satisfies the General Education Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirement.

FTY 111 – Forests Through Time Basic concepts of science will be used to explain how forests have responded to natural and human influences over time. With this foundation we will explore how a range of uses affects the future sustainability of forest systems and their ability to meet society’s needs. Credits: 1

GEO 210 – Geography of Maine A survey of spatial relationships and characteristics with a brief study of the development of Maine’s landscapes and focus on land use change and conflict, regional inequalities, locational decision-making, environmental management and planning and the personality of places.

HTY 210 – Maine History This course examines the social, economic, and political history of Maine from prehistoric times to the present. We will discuss the politics and economy of Maine’s past, and also the everyday lives of ordinary people – women, workers, immigrants, Native Americans, rural people and others. Students will be encouraged to explore Maine History through research in their local areas. Satisfies the General Education Western Cultural Tradition and Social Contexts and Institutions Requirements.

HTY 211 – Maine and the Sea An overview of Maine maritime history from aboriginal uses through the current state of maritime Maine. Emphasis on the coast’s history, inland Maine’s relationship with the sea, Maine’s maritime relationship to the world, and current historical and archaeological research.

HTY 315 – Shipwreck Sites: Archaeological and Historical Investigations The process of a complete shipwreck site investigation, from initial research through publication. Prerequisite: ANT 317 or permission

HTY 398 – Maine in the American Revolution This course explores the experience of Maine’s people from just before, during, and just after the American Revolution. The course will focus on Maine’s colonists and native peoples caught in the social, economic, and political storms of the late 1700s.

INT 491/WST 401/MES 520 - A Midwife’s Tale and the Social Web Investigates the concept of “social web” as introduced in A Midwife’s Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard, Based on Her Diary, 1785-1812. The “social web” is a metaphor to describe how the late eighteenth century community of Hallowell, Maine was woven together by the intricate warp and woof of social relations documented in Ballard’s diary and contextualized and interpreted by historian Laurel Ulrich. Using primary, secondary and fictional sources, an interdisciplinary group of faculty will lead students through an investigation of the ethical, legal, social and spiritual issues attendant upon womanhood and women’s work in Martha Ballard’s time and today. Satisfies the General Education Ethics, Social Contexts and Institutions, and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

LIB 500 – Exploring Interdisciplinarity Graduate students only. This course explores the meaning and methods of interdisciplinary studies. Through readings, written assignments, and discussion, we will consider the uses and limitations of interdisciplinarity. Throughout the semester we will also invite faculty members who are involved in interdisciplinary teaching and research to talk about their interdisciplinary experiences. This course is required for all MALS students.

LIB 500/MES 498 – A Sense of Place: Maine and Regional Identity Graduate students only. This interdisciplinary course explores Maine as a place with a unique identity. How does a sense of place shape Maine culture? We will examine images of Maine, from vacationland to impoverished rural backwoods, from quaint fishing villages to declining mill towns, from pristine wilderness to urban sprawl. What is the “real” Maine? Who and what is a Maine Yankee? Where and what is Down East? What does “Made in Maine” suggest? Drawing on poets, essayists, novelists and historians, we will explore and challenge these constructed images. Do such images reveal something essential about the state, or do they merely obscure the “real ” Maine? This course is required for all Maine Studies Graduate students.

MES 101 – Introduction to Maine Studies An interdisciplinary approach to the study of Maine through the sources in history, literature, political science, Native American studies, Franco American studies, and other fields. The unifying theme is the significance of locality in understanding the interaction between the landscape and the people. How does the Maine landscape shape people’s choices? How do the people use the state’s landscape and resources? How do social, demographic, cultural, and environmental factors shape this relationship throughout history? The activities examined include farming, fishing, lobstering, and lumbering. How have commercial interests intersected with environmental concerns? The cultures considered include Native American, early Anglo settlers, later Irish and Franco immigrants, and more recent immigration and refugee communities. Explore the contributions of selected individuals such as Percival Baxter, Edmund S. Muskie, Helen and Scott Nearing, and Roxanne Quimby who have all influenced thinking about the Maine landscape. Satisfies the General Education Population and the Environment and Writing Intensive Requirements.

MES 201 – The Maine Coast This course provides an interdisciplinary approach to studying the culture and environment of the Maine coast. We will use sources in art, history, literature, economics, Native American studies, African American studies, and other fields. The unifying theme is the significance of locality in understanding the interaction between the Maine coast and the people. How has the coastal topography shaped human activity there? How have artists and writers helped construct the Maine coast in the popular imagination? How do the people-both currently and in the past-use the state’s coastal landscape and resources? How do social, demographic, cultural, and environmental factors shape this relationship throughout history? We will examine industries such as granite, fishing, shipping, ship building, and tourism to explore how these commercial interests intersect with environmental concerns and link Maine to the global community. Finally, we will ask how we can reconcile further coastal development with the threat to the coast’s fragile environment. Satisfies the General Education Population and Environment, Social Context and Institutions, and the Writing Intensive Requirements.

MES 301 – Rachel Carson, Maine, and the Environment When Rachel Carson discovered the Maine coast, she found a place that nourished her writing, conservation ideals, and ecological studies. Today, Rachel Carson stands as a seminal figure in the modern environmental movement with work spanning ecology, natural history, chemistry, and environmental ethics. In this course, students will examine current environmental issues in Maine through various facets of Carson’s life, focusing on her science writing, ethical and ecological engagement with the world around her, and public reactions to her work. The class will give careful attention to ‘place’ and the role ‘place’ plays in Carson’s work. Some topics students will delve into in relation to Carson’s place-based approach include land use, climate change, marine ecology, natural resources, and the place of science in public policy. Students will have ample opportunity to pursue their own interests relating to Maine and Carson’s work, including pertinent environmental issues and policies; ecological science; science writing and public interpretations; and place-based research. 3 credits. Satisfies the general education requirements for Population and Environment and Writing Intensive.

MES 498/520 – Doing Nearby History and Folklore in the Classroom This course provides hands-on workshops for students and especially those in the education field who wish to focus on historical research techniques that can be used in the classroom and elsewhere. Nearby history includes the history of families, houses, farms, schools, churches, and communities. The course will lead students to understand why history is important and that it can be fun and rewarding. Topics covered will include storytelling, documents, oral histories, objects, landscapes and buildings, how to do research and how to link the local community to larger national and global issues. Course fee $30 (travel)

MES 498 - Topics in Maine Studies: Maine Women This course will explore women’s experiences in Maine, both historical and current. Through readings and discussions, we will analyze Maine women individually and collectively in such roles as industrial workers, reformers, performers, writers, politicians, and mothers. As we study Maine women we will keep in mind several major questions. How have Maine’s particular environment, culture, economy, and history shaped women’s experiences in the state? How have national movements (for example suffrage, ERA, welfare reform) shaped women’s lives in Maine? And how have issues of class, race, and ethnicity intersected with gender in Maine?

MES 520 – Advanced Topics in Maine Studies Graduate students only.

MES 530 – Maine Politics and Public Policy This seminar examines contemporary issues confronting the State of Maine and the politics that surround such issues. Particular attention is given to Maine’s role in national affairs, its unique environment, political parties and elections, the dynamics of the legislative, executive and judicial branches, the structure and operation of local governmental institutions, including regional governance, and the formulation and administration of state and local politics, including taxing and spending policies.

MES 598 – Directed Study in Maine Studies Graduate students only

NAS 120 – Introduction to Wabanaki Culture and History This course focuses on the tribes that make up the Wabanaki Confederacy – Maliseet, Micmac, Passamaquoddy and Penobscot. We will examine the individual tribes’ history, culture, philosophy, and creation stories. In order to contextualize the tribal status today, we will provide a brief overview of Canadian, U.S., and Maine Indian history. This course examines in detail the worldview, way of life, art, literature, and contemporary issues of the Native nations which make up the confederacy. It will provide discussion about the confederacy itself and its impact. This course explores concepts such as sovereignty, treaty rights, and tribal government. We will benefit from the expertise of tribal community members who will come in at selected times throughout the semester to provide additional insight into the issues. While this course is open to all students, it serves to introduce the rich culture of Maine’s indigenous peoples to Maine educators teaching under the mandated law, LD 291: An Act to Require the Teaching of Maine Native History and Culture. Satisfies the General Education Social Contexts and Institutions, and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

NAS 401 – Topics in Wabanaki Culture – Teaching Place, Maine History and Culture The purpose of this course is to aid educators in their understanding an appreciation of Native American history and culture to enhance the effectiveness of teaching about native peoples and culture, with a concentration on the Wabanaki Peoples.

NAS 401(990) / EDU 580 – Topics in Wabanaki Culture – Teaching About Maine Indians’ History and Culture This course guides the development of culturally appropriate classroom strategies, practices and curriculum to effectively teach L.D. 291: An Act to Require the Teaching of Maine Native American History and Culture in Maine Schools.

POS 203 – American State and Local Government This course surveys the approximately 80,000 subnational governments in the United States, giving special focus to Maine politics and government. The aim is to provide a base of both factual information and political ideas to enable students to understand the politics and policies of state and local governments generally, and the processes of Maine politics in particular. The course is conducted in informal lecture format and encourages student questions and discussion. Films and occasional online interviews with public officials will supplement the online lectures and discussions. Satisfies the General Education Social Contexts and Institution Requirement.

WST 201 – Maine Women This course will explore women’s experiences in Maine, both historical and current. Through readings and discussions, we will analyze Maine women individually and collectively in such roles as industrial workers, reformers, performers, writers, politicians, and mothers. As we study Maine women we will keep in mind several major questions. How have Maine’s particular environment, culture, economy, and history shaped women’s experiences in the state? How have national movements (for example suffrage, ERA, welfare reform) shaped women’s lives in Maine? And how have issues of class, race, and ethnicity intersected with gender in Maine?

 

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