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Accounting — Communications

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Accounting

Maine Business School

Accounting majors gain skills in the organization and presentation of financial information to corporate stakeholders and internal financial and managerial information to business managers. Our accounting graduates are sought by accounting firms, public or private companies, nonprofits and government entities for financial reporting, taxation, auditing and business consulting. Accounting majors often take jobs as accountants, auditors, budget analysts, credit analysts, financial examiners, tax examiners and collectors, revenue agents and business consultants.

Visit the Maine Business School website
View a printable fact sheet for Maine Business School (pdf)


Animal and Veterinary Sciences

College of Natural Sciences, Forestry, and Agriculture

The School of Food and Agriculture at the University of Maine offers a Bachelor of Science degree in animal and veterinary sciences with an optional concentration in pre-veterinary sciences. The program is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of the anatomy, breeding, diseases, genetics, management, nutrition and physiology of farm animals, avian species, and laboratory and companion animals. The curriculum prepares students to pursue careers in veterinary medicine, teaching, technical sales and service work in agriculture, research and animal agriculture, including the dairy, livestock, and equine industries. Students gain hands-on experience with economically important domestic species such as dairy cattle, Standardbred horses, and Icelandic sheep at the University’s J.F. Witter Teaching and Research Center.

Visit the School of Food and Agriculture website
View a printable fact sheet for Animal and Veterinary Science (pdf)


Anthropology

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Anthropology promotes understanding and appreciation of social complexity and diversity, actively improving the human condition. Anthropology faculty at the University of Maine are nationally and internationally known for their interdisciplinary research, which instills in students a broad understanding of human complexity through time and across the globe. Anthropology provides a well-rounded, generalist education that provides students with the ability to critically evaluate theories, options and actions that affect humankind. UMaine anthropology students are involved directly in research in the lab, in the field, and through independent, faculty-mentored study opportunities. Students have participated in excavations in Croatia, Peru and Belize to analyze changes in ancient urban and agricultural landscapes; participated as research assistants in forensic taphonomy experiments; been involved in research of the Maine groundfish industry; and participated in the analysis of cultural perceptions of climate change. The department has five active research laboratories where students are involved in many aspects of research analysis.

Visit the Department of Anthropology website
View a printable fact sheet for Anthropology (pdf)


Art Education

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Art education is a field of research, study and practice, which has expanded beyond public school art teaching. Undergraduate study in UMaine’s NCATE-accredited art education program not only prepares students for teaching certification, but also for graduate work in specialized areas of art education and related fields of study. Some majors choose careers in museum education, art therapy, community arts education, arts administration, or other fields, which involve working closely with people and art. Art education majors benefit from UMaine’s recently renovated, state-of-the-art facilities, including the Wyeth Family Studio Art Center — a visual arts complex featuring light, open, airy, purpose-built studios for painting, drawing, 3-D design, photography and printmaking — and Lord Hall which houses the expanded facilities for art education, art history and a gallery.

Visit the Department of Art website
View a printable fact sheet for Art (pdf)


Art History

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Art history students begin the program with introductory courses that survey historically significant objects and monuments, including paintings, graphics, drawings, sculptures, pottery, photographs and architecture, from ancient times through the present. These courses consider form, content, role and meaning of expressive works in light of their social, political, philosophical and cultural contexts. The program stresses an awareness of how diverse methodological approaches frame knowledge of each particular subject. With its focus upon critical thinking in verbal and nonverbal forms of cognition, the art history program prepares students for many options including continued study at the graduate level. It readies students for careers in museums, art galleries, arts administration, antiquities, communications, arts libraries and arts criticism. Art history majors benefit from UMaine’s recently renovated, state-of-the-art facilities, including the Wyeth Family Studio Art Center — a visual arts complex featuring light, open, airy, purpose-built studios for painting, drawing, 3-D design, photography and printmaking — and Lord Hall which houses the expanded facilities for art education, art history and a gallery.

Visit the Department of Art website
View a printable fact sheet for Art (pdf)


Athletic Training

College of Education and Human Development 

Outstanding facilities, diverse hands-on learning opportunities and the chance to study at Maine’s only Division I school are hallmarks of the University of Maine’s athletic training program. The nationally accredited program incorporates rich academics and an intensive hands-on clinical component where students work directly with UMaine and community athletic trainers and health care providers. Students are exposed to athletic training at the high school, college and university levels, at private practices, and in local hospitals and health care facilities. As a result of the professional and academic experience students gain at UMaine, program graduates enjoy an excellent job placement rate.

Visit the College of Education and Human Development website
View a printable fact sheet for Athletic Training (pdf)

Wallstreet Bull
Man putting sculpture together
Home Coming

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Biochemistry

College Natural Sciences, Forestry, and Agriculture

The Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences offers a Bachelor of Science degree in biochemistry. Biochemistry is the study of all living systems at the cellular and molecular level. In addition to traditional study of the structure and function of biological molecules and understanding of metabolism, the field has come to encompass aspects of molecular biology, molecular genetics, and many areas of biotechnology. An important aspect of the biochemistry undergraduate program is the requirement for hands-on experience in the laboratory. Laboratory courses are offered in fundamental aspects of biochemistry and microbiology as well as specialized topics such as recombinant DNA techniques, virology, cell culture, immunology, pathogenic microbiology and microbial genetics. Graduates of this program have taken positions in university research laboratories; biotechnology industries; medical, dental and veterinary research laboratories; public health laboratories; pharmaceutical, food and chemical industries; and environmental research and monitoring laboratories. Students in this program are encouraged to consider the Accelerated Binary Degree Program (3+4 program), which allows qualifying students majoring in biochemistry or microbiology at UMaine to be admitted to the College of Osteopathic Medicine at UNE after three years at UMaine rather than the customary four. Upon successful completion of the first year of medical school at UNE, students participating in this program will receive a bachelor’s degree in biochemistry from UMaine.

Visit the Molecular and Biomedical Sciences website
View a printable fact sheet for Biochemistry (pdf)


Bioengineering

College of Engineering 

Bioengineering encompasses a broad range of topics that focus on the interface between biology and engineering. Bioengineers use engineering skills to design devices or develop methods that interface with biological systems to benefit society, including the design of artificial organs; development of new methods to detect or treat cancer; production of devices to measure biological agents; or formulation of materials for the controlled release of drugs. Bioengineers work at the forefront of research and industry and frequently address clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic applications of engineering. Students typically have a strong interest in science and problem solving, and through the curriculum receive thorough training in mathematics, science, and the fundamentals of engineering. Required courses include instrumentation in bioengineering, biomaterials, and transport processes in biological systems with additional elective coursework in engineering, humanities and social sciences. The curriculum terminates in a hands-on capstone project in which the students design and build a prototype device to solve an industry-identified problem. Students graduate from the program prepared for employment in industry, or further specialized study in medical or graduate school.

Visit the Molecular and Biomedical Sciences website
View a printable fact sheet for Bioengineering (pdf)


Biology

College of Natural Sciences, Forestry, and Agriculture

A major in biology allows students to explore various aspects of our natural world. Tremendous advances in biotechnology, medicine, environmental studies and related areas make biology an important and fascinating field of study. Biology is a broad field that seeks to understand living creatures — from animals and plants to fungi and microbes. Biologists help find cures for diseases, become doctors, save endangered species and more. Biology-related career fields include human and veterinary medicine, scientific research and development, teaching at the high school and college levels, environmental monitoring and regulation at state and federal levels, and private design and consulting. Biology majors study how living organisms function at the cellular, tissue, organ, and organismal levels.  A diverse set of courses allows students to learn evolutionary principles, biodiversity, and how organisms interact with each other and with their physical environment. Biology majors are exposed to a variety of research opportunities. Students who plan to attend graduate school are strongly encouraged to pursue independent research under the guidance of a member of the biology faculty in their third and fourth years of study.  Research in the field of biology aims to increase knowledge about living organisms in order to combat problems we face in fields such as medicine, agriculture, and ecology.

The School of Biology and Ecology offers Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts degrees in biology, both providing a strong background in the biological sciences.  The B.S. degree requires more math, organic chemistry, and physics, and is appropriate preparation for medical school, and career fields requiring greater knowledge of physical sciences and mathematics.  The B.A. requires more coursework in human sciences and is appropriate preparation for careers involving finance, management, or social sciences, such as teaching, writing, policy, or health management.  Often a B.A. is acceptable for admission to graduate school.  Students should research the graduate programs of interest to them to learn about specific admissions requirements before selecting either the B.S. or B.A. options.

Visit the School of Biology and Ecology website
View a printable fact sheet for Biology (pdf)


Botany

College of Natural Sciences, Forestry, and Agriculture 

Botany is the study of all aspects of the biology of plants. Plants are of critical importance to the world and in human society. Tremendous advances in biotechnology, environmental studies, and related areas make botany an important and fascinating field of study. Botanists work to understand plants as major primary producers, as foundations of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and as essential resources.  Examples of botany-related careers include horticulture and agriculture, plant breeding, biotechnology, scientific research and development, teaching at the high school and college levels, and environmental monitoring and regulation at state and federal levels.  Botany majors study how plants function at the cellular, tissue, organ, and organismal levels.  A diverse set of courses allows students to study the evolution and biodiversity  of plants, plant ecology, taxonomy, and physiology. Students who plan to attend graduate school are strongly encouraged to pursue independent research under the guidance of a member of the biology faculty in their third and fourth years of study .

The School of Biology and Ecology offers Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts degrees in botany, both providing a strong background in the biological sciences.  The B.S. degree requires more math, organic chemistry, and physics, and is appropriate preparation for graduate school, and botany-related career fields requiring greater knowledge of physical sciences and mathematics.  The B.A. requires more coursework in human sciences and is appropriate preparation for careers involving management, or social sciences, such as teaching, writing, policy, or environmental management.  Often a B.A. is acceptable for admission to graduate school.  Students should research the graduate programs of interest to them to learn about specific admissions requirements before selecting either the B.S. or B.A. options.

Visit the School of Biology and Ecology website
View a printable fact sheet for Botany (pdf)

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Chemical Engineering

College of Engineering

Chemical engineering curriculum includes core courses in engineering, mathematics, and science combined with electives in engineering, humanities and social sciences. Majors will gain a sound foundation in the principles of chemical engineering and an understanding of the scientific principles on which chemical engineering is based. Required courses cover both the scientific foundations of the subject and the relevant engineering sciences such as stoichiometry, thermodynamics, kinetics, fluid mechanics, and unit operations. Economics and process design are learned in the senior year. The program is structured to allow for a two-term co-op experience (summer/spring or fall/summer) during the junior year while still completing the degree in four years. Undergraduate students are prepared for immediate employment as well as graduate and professional studies. Graduates find employment in all the major process industries: petroleum refining, petrochemicals, commodity chemicals, pharmaceuticals, polymers, production of semiconductors and the pulp and paper industry.

Visit the College of Engineering website
View a printable fact sheet for Chemical Engineering (pdf)


Chemistry

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
UMaine’s chemistry program provides students with the foundational knowledge and practical skills to investigate and understand matter at the molecular level — from the basic structure of materials to techniques for synthesizing new drugs; from an understanding of chemical bonding to the control of properties of advanced materials for specific applications. The department is committed to providing students with instruction in the most modern practice of chemistry through ongoing curriculum development. The American Chemical Society-certified program provides opportunities for chemistry majors to engage in exciting research in state-of-the-art labs alongside faculty and graduate students. UMaine chemistry majors are prepared for careers in the chemical industry and high school education, as well as for medical and other professional schools, and for graduate work in chemistry.

Visit the Department of Chemistry website
View a printable fact sheet for Chemistry (pdf)


Child Development and Family Relations

College of Education and Human Development

Child development and family relations prepares students to work with children, youth and families in a variety of rewarding and challenging careers, including behavioral specialist, early childhood educator, child advocate, recreation/camp director, parent education and intervention programs. Students study the growth and development across the lifespan of individuals in the contexts of schools, communities and families. Students have the opportunity to work on such projects as teaching in the campus preschool, nature playground development and best practices in curriculum. Program curriculum (depending on choice of concentration) meets the rigorous standards and requirements of the National Council of Family Relations’ Certified Family Life Educator, Maine Endorsement 029: Early Elementary Teacher (grades K–3), and Maine Endorsement 081: Early Childhood Teacher (birth–PreK).

Visit the College of Education and Human Development website
View a printable fact sheet for Child Development and Family Relsations (pdf)


Civil and Environmental Engineering

College of Engineering

Civil and environmental engineers are primarily responsible for planning, designing and constructing facilities, including highways and railroads, bridges and tunnels, airports and harbors, hydroelectric dams and power plants, irrigation and flood control projects, and the foundations and frames of buildings. Environmental engineers plan and design water purification plants, pollution control facilities, and other environmental protection projects. The program prepares graduates to practice the disciplines of transportation, environmental, structural, water resources, and geotechnical engineering, and/or related fields; engage in advanced education, research and development; pursue continuing education and professional licensure; promote and advance public health and safety, and enhance quality of life; act in a responsible, professional, and ethical manner. Graduates work in consulting firms, construction, manufacturing industries such as paper, chemical, and shipbuilding in the engineering offices of cities and towns, for government agencies and in private practice.

Visit the Civil and Environmental Engineering website
View a printable fact sheet for Civil and Environmental Engineering (pdf)


Communications

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Communication majors study how humans use communication to produce cultures, institutions and even a sense of self. The study of communication asks how mankind’s basic ability to communicate allows it to build connections between individuals and in cultures and organizations. Students learn about responsibilities, consequences and power dynamics involved in the way societies and cultures communicate and pursue answers to questions, including how do we use the power of language in personal relationships?, how do the stories we tell provide meaning and significance to the identities we fashion for ourselves, or cultures?, and what communication practices do we engage in to maintain and build organizations? By asking these questions students are able to understand and critically evaluate human communication in their lives and careers. Graduates work in all forms of organizations — public, private and academic — because communication is a fundamental part of human activity. Recent graduates have taken positions with sports teams, news agencies, businesses, banks, medical centers and nonprofits.

Visit the Communication and Journalism website
View a printable fact sheet for Communications (pdf)