Course Descriptions

Level: 100 | 200 | 300 | 400 | 500 | 600


ERS 101 – Introduction to Geology

A study of earth materials and processes, including their impact on humans. Topics include mineralogy, formation of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, geologic time, weathering and soil formation, glaciation, deserts and desertification, coastlines, earthquakes and seismology, and evolution of mountain belts and plate tectonics. Laboratory work includes the study of rocks, minerals, topographic maps and aerial photographs in preparation for a one-day field trip to Acadia National Park. Satisfies the General Education Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences Requirement. Lec 3, Lab 3.

Credits: 4 (lecture and laboratory)


ERS 102 – Environmental Geology of Maine

After developing an understanding of rocks, minerals and geologic time, the course explores the modern distribution of natural geologic resources that limit human activity and influence political and economic decision-making. Examines the impact of humans on the physical and chemical environment and subsequent impact on the biosphere, and geologic hazards. Ends with a detailed look at the terrestrial and marine geologic records related to climate change and explores hypotheses related to the mechanisms and rates of climate change. The emphasis in the course is on the Maine geologic environment. One-day field trip. Satisfies the General Education Laboratory in the Basic or Applied Sciences and Population and the Environment Requirements. Lec 3, Lab 3.

Credits: 4 (lecture and laboratory)


ERS 103 – Dynamic Earth

Explores how Earth’s dynamic processes interact with humans by evaluating: the interplay between Earth’s interior, hydrosphere, biosphere and atmosphere; the effects and underlying causes of natural hazards such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tidal waves and global warming; Earth’s economic and energy resources how they form and how long they will lasts; and the global environment and how best to interact with it. Satisfies the General Education Applications of Scientific Knowledge and Population and the Environment Requirements. Lec 3.

Credits: 3


ERS 108 – Beaches and Coasts

An introduction to coastal landforms, including beaches, salt marshes, tidal flats and sea cliffs, their origins, global distribution, and associated nearshore processes. Human impacts to the coastal zone, including coastal erosion, land loss and management, and human responses to sea-level change are considered. One day field trip. Lec 3. (This course is identical to SMS 108.) Satisfies the General Education Applications of Scientific Knowledge and Population and the Environment Requirements.

Credits: 3


ERS 121 – Humans and Global Change

Explores how Earth’s climate system works and how past environmental changes affected humans on time scales ranging from interannual to hundreds of thousands of years. Topics will range from the development of agriculture at the beginning of the current interglaciation to how humans are now changing global climate through the addition of greenhouses gases to the atmosphere. Satisfies the General Education Population and the Environment Requirement.

Credits: 3


ERS 191 – Energy in the Earth System
Explores the Earth Science concepts that underlie energy, energy sources, distribution, and flow. We will consider the ways in which society interacts with and extracts energy from the Earth System, the climate and environmental implications of energy use, and gain an understanding of renewable and non-renewable energy sources.

Satisfies the General Education Applications of Scientific Knowledge and Quantitative Literacy Requirements.

Credits: 3


ERS 200 – Earth Systems

A survey of dynamic topics in earth sciences, emphasizing active participation in on-going faculty research in topics such as: global climite change, changing sea levels, geochemical cycles, plate tectonics and mountain building, and the geological evolution of the northern Appalachians. Multiple field trips and ideal for students with interest in studying or teaching earth sciences. Satisfies the General Education Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences Requirement. Lec 3, Lab 3.

Prerequisites & Notes: any 100-level UMaine Earth Sciences course.

Credits: 4 (lecture and laboratory)


ERS 201 – Global Environmental Change

Examines the physical and chemical interactions among the primary systems operating at the Earth’s surface (atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, biosphere, lithosphere) on various timescales throughout geologic history. We will consider internal and external forces that have shaped environmental evolution, including the role of humans in recent geochemical and climatic change. During lecture and laboratory sessions, our goals are to develop critical thinking skills and a scientific approach to the complex array of feedbacks operating at the Earth’s surface, as well as an appreciation for how past environmental change informs current societal issues. This course satisfies the Science Applications and Population & Environment General Education requirements.

Prerequisites: any 100-level Earth Sciences course.

Credits: 4 (lecture and laboratory)


ERS 230 – Earth and Climate Science Geomatics
This course will provide an introduction to the collection, display, manipulation and management of geospatial information. The focus will be on modern tools, techniques and methodologies commonly used by earth and environmental scientists. The course will be divided into surveying and mapping (including GPS), satellite remote sensing, and geographical information systems (GIS). Lec. 2.5 hr, Lab 3hr.

Prerequisites: ERS 101 and ERS 102 and ERS 103 or ERS 108 or SMS 108 or permission of instructors.

Credits: 4 (lecture and laboratory)


ERS 240 – The Atmosphere
The nature of planetary atmospheres, physical processes in the atmosphere, clouds and precipitation, global climate, seasons, natural and anthropogenic climate change, forecasting of storms. Lec 3, Lab 2.

Satisfies the General Education Laboratory in the Basic or Applied Sciences Requirement.

Credits: 4 (lecture and laboratory)


ERS 312 – Geochemistry

Introduction to the field of geochemistry, from Earth formation to modern processes in the deep Earth and at the surface. We will investigate the chemistry of many Earth materials, including rocks, soils, surface and ground waters, and oceans.

Prerequisites: ERS 100 or ERS 101 or ERS 102 or ERS 103; and CHY 121/123

Credits: 3


ERS 315 – Principles of Sedimentology and Stratigraphy

Basic concepts and techniques of stratigraphy and sedimentation. Field trips to local environments and outcrops. Laboratories emphasize practical analytical techniques of sedimentology, petrography of sedimentary rocks in hand specimens and thin section, and modern stratigraphic approaches. Satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive Requirement. Lec 3, Lab 3.

Prerequisites & Notes: ERS 101 or ERS 102 and MAT 232 or permission.

Credits: 4 (lecture and laboratory)


ERS 316 – Structural Geology

Explores the principles of structural geology, with emphasis on the geometry, kinematics and dynamics of Earth deformation. Includes several field trips with the aim of integrating field observations and theory. Satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive requirement.

Prerequisite: ERS 200

Credits: 4


ERS 317 – Introduction to Geophysics

Introduction to geophysical studies of the Earth. Seismological, gravity, magnetic, electrical and geothermal studies of the Earth’s lithosphere are emphasized. Field exercises on one afternoon of selected weeks; course problem solving requires spread sheeting/ graphical applications using available personal computers.

Prerequisites & Notes: ERS 101 or ERS 102, MAT 126, and PHY 111; or permission.

Credits: 3


ERS 319 – Geohazards and Humans

Geohazards and Humans will introduce the scientific principles necessary to understand the underlying causes of the most devastating natural disasters on Earth. Students will learn how to apply modern geological concepts and theories to identify drivers of major geological hazards and reduce their impacts. It is designed for students who major in the geosciences but will also benefit students majoring in environmental science, engineering, public policy and business. A primary goal is to translate a working knowledge of the science of natural hazards into strong critical-thinking and problem-solving skills to prepare students to work with geohazards in their future careers. To meet this goal, the course objectives are to demonstrate the use of geological methods and techniques to study geological hazards, and introduce tools that help to mitigate the impact of these events on humans. Students will learn about established and emerging approaches for reducing the impact of volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, extra-terrestrial impacts, shifts in climate and anthropogenic pollutants on humans and the global economy.

Prerequisites: Any 100-level Earth Science course or by permission

Credits: 3


ERS 320 – Research Seminar in Earth and Climate Sciences

Research seminar course of students with junior or senior standing. Students will attend research presentations by School of Earth and Climate Sciences faculty with the goals of increasing student understanding and awareness of the role of research in earth and climate science.

Prerequisites: ERS 200 and ERS 201 and Junior or Senior Standing

Credits: 1


ERS 321 – Problems in Earth and Climate Sciences

Students conduct an original investigation and report findings. May not normally be used as a required geology elective. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor

Credits: 1-4


ERS 323 – Extreme Weather

Extreme weather is analyzed in terms of its physical basis as well as historical, economic and human consequences. Emphasis is placed on the interplay between technological advances, the evolution of meteorology as a science, and the impacts of extreme weather (winter storms, severe thunderstorms, tornados, tropical storms, El Nino, floods, droughts, heatwaves, cold waves).

Prerequisites Recommended: ERS 121 or ERS 240

Credits: 3


ERS 330 – Earth Materials

Examination of fundamental aspects of the materials that record Earth history and the processes that shape the planet. Through a combination of lectures, laboratory sessions, and other active-learning exercises, we explore how minerals form, their structure and composition, and their physical and chemical properties. Through discussions and presentations, we explore the intersection of minerals and society, including industrial applications and modern environmental issues. Throughout the course, we relate mineralogy to geologic processes and other fields of Earth Science. Lec 3, Lab 2.

Prerequisites: ERS200 or 201 or by permission; CHY121 and MAT126 recommended.

Credits: 4


ERS 340 – Economic Geology
This course examines the geological characteristics of metallic and industrial mineral deposits, the geological environments and processes responsible for their genesis, the methods used in their discovery and extraction, and the challenges of environmentally responsible reclamation of extraction sites.

Prerequisites: ERS 330 or permission.

Credits: 3


ERS 350 – Fresh-Water Flow

Fresh-Water Flow focuses on characterizing fresh-water hydrologic systems (Lakes, Rivers, ground water, etc) and the fluxes of water between these reservoirs. Rates of precipitation, evaporation, channelized flow, overland flow, and infiltration are calculated and used to assess watershed hydrology.

Prerequisite: MAT 122

Credits: 3


ERS 361 –  The Principles of Geomorphology

Focuses on the shapes, dimensions, and dynamics of landforms on Earth. The material covered will provide an introductory understanding of process mechanics and their relation to the genesis and alteration of landforms in varied settings and over a range of scales. Topics covered will include general background on the discipline of geomorphology, internal and climate forces associated with earth surface systems, chemical and physical weathering, drainage basins, fluvial systems, wind generated landforms, glacial processes, karst landscapes, and coastal environments. The course approach will provide attention to landform ontologies, measurement techniques, and analytical frameworks necessary to quantify earth surface measurement and observations. Two one-day weekend field trips may be scheduled during the semester.

Prerequisite: ERS 200 and ERS 201

Credits: 3


ERS 401 – Paleoceanography

The ocean plays a central role in regulating climate and supporting life on our planet, and it has not always operated as it does today. Throughout Earth history, the ocean has undergone dramatic changes in circulation, temperature, chemical composition, and more. In this course, students will explore our ocean’s dynamic past, which provides insight into its present and future behavior. We will discuss key research techniques, major discoveries, and emerging frontiers in the field of paleoceanography (the study of the global ocean’s circulation, chemistry, biology, and geology through geologic time). Students will read and discuss key research articles each week that complement lecture material. They will also work with both modern and paleo datasets to enhance their skills and deepen their understanding of how scientists infer past ocean conditions from geologic archives.

Prerequisite: Any 100 level ERS course.

Credits 3


ERS 420 – Computer Applications in Earth Science

Computer Applications in Earth Science will focus on using computers as a tool to solve problems in the Earth Sciences. This course will include a basic review of mathematical topics and will explore computer methods that are particularly relevant in the Earth Sciences. Students will learn to use an interpreted computer language (Python, Matlab, or similar software) to perform calculations, evaluate data sets, create complex graphs, and simulate simple systems.

Prerequisites: MAT 126 and MAT 127.

Credits: 3


ERS 425 – How to Build a Habitable Planet

This course will take a journey through the remarkable geologic and climatic events that led to the emergence of life, an oxygen-rich atmosphere, explosions and collapses of biodiversity, waxing and waning of continental ice sheets, and ultimately a planet on which Homo Sapiens could thrive and develop civilizations unlike anything Earth has ever witnessed. We will explore the great and as-yet unsolved mysteries of Earth’s evolution with an eye toward placing our existence into the context of what it takes to build, and sustain, a habitable world. We will consider internal and external forces that have shaped environmental evolution over the planet’s history, including the role of humans in geochemical and climatic change. We will consider the geochemical proxies and isotopic geochronometers that have improved our understanding of past environments and climates. Our goals are to develop critical thinking and writing skills and a scientific approach to the complex array of feedbacks that govern the evolution of Earth’s surface and climate, as well as an appreciation for how past Earth System change can inform current human and societal issues.

ERS 425 and ERS 525 cannot both be taken for credit.

Prerequisites: ERS 200 and ERS 201


ERS 433 – Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology

Using field relationships, rock textures, and chemical systems, we take a qualitative and quantitative system-based approach to exploring rock-forming processes within Earth’s crust and mantle. In keeping with the fact that modern understanding of igneous and metamorphic processes requires use of microscopes and microanalysis, students will use petrographic and electron microscopes to make observations and gather data related to mineral chemistry and textures in preparation for later analysis. This course also develops aspects of scientific methodology, including classification schemes and data collection, management, and analysis. Several weekend field trips are required.

Prerequisite: ERS 330

Credits: 4


ERS 441 – Glaciers and Our Landscape

Cross-listed at ERS 541. Explores the nature of the ice ages, including the work of glaciers and how they shape the earth’s surface. Emphasis is on understanding the processes that resulted in the landscape and sediments we see today. Required field trips. Satisfies the General Education Population and the Environment and Writing Intensive Requirements.

Prerequisites & Notes: Any 100-level earth sciences course.

Credits: 3


ERS 444 – Introduction to Glaciology

Glaciers and ice sheets cover a significant portion of the planet and have major impacts on surrounding Earth systems and human communities. Glaciers act as a consistent source of freshwater, they sculpt the Earth’s near surface geology, and they can influence tectonics, weather, climate, ocean and surrounding ecosystems. This course will study the life cycle of glaciers and ice sheets, the physics which influence their structure, size, movement, and their interaction with surrounding environments. This course will also explore tools and methods used to study glaciers and ice sheets through practical exercises and experiments. Methods we will explore include classic field glaciological techniques, geochemistry, geophysics, remote sensing, and numerical modeling.

Perequisites: ERS 200 or ERS 201 and MAT 116 or MAT 126 or permission of the instructor

Credits: 4 with lab


ERS 451 – Tectonics

Exploration of the plate tectonic mechanisms that control and modify the first-order features of Earth’s surface. We consider how the movement of the uppermost 100-200 km of our planet creates the topographic features and patterns in the continents and oceans. One weekend field trip.

Prerequisites: any 200-level ERS course or permission

Credits: 3


ERS 460 – Marine Geology

Topics include theories of the origin of the earth as a planet and the development of continents and ocean basins, morphology and structure of the sea floor, interpretation of geological and geophysical evidence relevant to the origin and evolution of major tectonic features of oceans. Students may not receive credit for both ERS 460 and ERS 560.

Prerequisites: ERS 100, 101, 102, 103, or 108

Credits: 3


ERS 461 – Fluvial Processes in Geomorphology

This course will focus on the forms, dimensions and dynamics of streams and rivers.  The material covered will provide an overview of the physical characteristics of stream and river channels in varied settings, approaches used for physical assessments of channel conditions, and quantitative methods to evaluate hydraulic conditions that influence stream and river channel appearance and dynamics.  The course will include applications of concepts in fluvial geomorphology in the planning, design and monitoring of stream corridor restoration and management projects.  Two one-day weekend field trips may be scheduled during the semester.

Prerequisites: ERS 350 or ERS 588 or instructor permission

Credits: 3


ERS 491 – Introduction to Meteorology and Climatology
Cross-listed as ERS 591. The climatic system, survey of atmospheric behavior and climatic change; meteorological measurements and analysis; formulation of physical principles governing weather and climate with selected applications to small and large scale phenomena. (ERS 491 and ERS 591 are identical courses.)

Prerequisites: MAT 126 and PHY 112 or PHY 122 or permission

Credits: 3


ERS 498 – Undergraduate Thesis

Original research in geological sciences. The research problem must be identified prior to the start of the senior year and may be of an experimental, empirical or theoretical approach. A committee of three or more faculty will supervise the thesis and its defense. Satisfies the General Education Capstone Experience Requirement.

Prerequisites & Notes: Senior standing.

Credits: 3


ERS 499 – Field or Laboratory Experience

Students will attend a four- to six-week earth or climate science field camp or engage in equivalent field-based research activities.  The experience (a) draws together the various threads of the School’s undergraduate program, (b) typifies the work of professionals within Earth and Climate Sciences, (c) develops problem-solving skills while working within a natural system, and (d) develops spatial cognition and reasoning.

General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education Capstone Experience Requirement.

Prerequisites: Senior standing.

Course Typically Offered: Fall & Summer

Credits: 6


ERS 521 – Low Temperature-Pressure Geochemistry

Algebraic and graphical analysis of water-mineral interactions at earth surface conditions. Topics include congruent and incongruent solubility, complexing, redox reactions, ion exchange, coprecipitation, chemical precipitation, evaporation, and diffusion.

Prerequisites & Notes: CHY 121, MAT 126.

Credits: 3


ERS 525 – How to Build a Habitable Planet

This course will take a journey through the remarkable geologic and climatic events that led to the emergence of life, an oxygen-rich atmosphere, explosions and collapses of biodiversity, waxing and waning of continental ice sheets, and ultimately a planet on which Homo Sapiens could thrive and develop civilizations unlike anything Earth has ever witnessed. We will explore the great and as-yet unsolved mysteries of Earth’s evolution with an eye toward placing our existence into the context of what it takes to build, and sustain, a habitable world. We will consider internal and external forces that have shaped environmental evolution over the planet’s history, including the role of humans in geochemical and climatic change. We will consider the geochemical proxies and isotopic geochronometers that have improved our understanding of past environments and climates. Our goals are to develop critical thinking and writing skills and a scientific approach to the complex array of feedbacks that govern the evolution of Earth’s surface and climate, as well as an appreciation for how past Earth System change can inform current human and societal issues.

ERS 425 and ERS 525 cannot both be taken for credit.


ERS 527 – Isotope Geology

Theory of variations in the relative abundances of naturally occurring radioactive and stable isotopes. Applications will emphasize the use of isotopic tracers in studies of petrogenesis, geochronology, paleoceanography and paleoecology.

Prerequisites & Notes: ERS 333 or permission.

Credits: 3


ERS 532 – Advanced Sedimentology

Advanced concepts of sedimentology: hydrodynamics of sediment transport and deposition, origin and characteristics of the major sedimentary rock types, facies analysis and modern stratigraphic approaches. Laboratories emphasize textural analysis, numerical and computer applications, and sequence stratigraphy. Research paper and verbal presentation required. Lec 3, Lab 3.

Prerequisites & Notes: ERS 315, SMS 270 or permission.

Credits: 4


ERS 541 – Glaciers and Our Landscape
Explores the nature of the ice ages, including the work of glaciers and how they shape the earth’s surface. Emphasis is on understanding the processes that resulted in the landscape and sediments we see today. Required field trips. (ERS 441 and 541 are identical courses and cannot both be taken for degree credit.)

General Education Requirements: Satisfies the General Education Population and the Environment and Writing Intensive Requirements.

Prerequisites: Any 100 level ERS course or Graduate Standing

Credits: 3


ERS 542 – Quaternary Environments and Climatic Change

Study of the physical environments of the Quaternary Period with special emphasis on ice-age theories, world-wide terrestrial and marine glacial stratigraphy, paleoclimatology, and effects of environment on society. One weekend field trip. Lec 2, Lab 2.

Prerequisites & Notes: ERS 541 or permission.

Credits: 3


ERS 544 – Introduction to Glaciology

Glaciers and ice sheets cover a significant portion of the planet and have major impacts on surrounding Earth systems and human communities. Glaciers act as a consistent source of freshwater, they sculpt the Earth’s near surface geology, and they can influence tectonics, weather, climate, ocean and surrounding ecosystems. This course will study the life cycle of glaciers and ice sheets, the physics which influence their structure, size, movement, and their interaction with surrounding environments. This course will also explore tools and methods used to study glaciers and ice sheets through practical exercises and experiments. Methods we will explore include classic field glaciological techniques, geochemistry, geophysics, remote sensing, and numerical modeling.

Perequisites: ERS 200 or ERS 201 and MAT 116 or MAT 126 or permission of the instructor

Credits: 4 with lab


ERS 552 – Geomorphology

Emphasis on physical geomorphic processes and how these processes control landform development and evolution. Topics include drainage networks, rivers, slopes, shore processes, weathering, soils, mass movement, glacial landforms, arid region landforms and climate change.

Prerequisites & Notes: ERS 315 or permission.

Credits: 2-3


ERS 553 – The Quaternary Stratigraphic Record

Explores cutting-edge hypotheses for Quaternary climate change. Presents records used to develop and test these hypotheses.

Prerequisite: Permission or graduate major in Earth and Climate Sciences

Credits: 3


ERS 555 – Microstructural Processes

An examination of deformation mechanisms and resulting microstructures in rocks, use of prophyroblast-matrix relationships to determine timing relations between deformation and metamorphism and interpretation of kinematic indicators that form during rock deformation. Lec 2, Lab 2.

Prerequisites & Notes: ERS 316, ERS433

Credits: 3


ERS 578 – Metamorphic Petrology

A study of the genesis of metamorphic rocks with emphasis on the regional petrologic and geologic history of a metamorphic terrain, the procedures for ascertaining the pressure and temperature prevailing during metamorphism, and a detailed consideration of the composition of fluid and volatile phases participating in the metamorphic mineral reactions. Lec 3, Lab 4.

Credits: 4


ERS 580 – Introduction to Hydrogeology

The role of groundwater in geologic processes: the hydrologic cycle, groundwater transport equations, chemical evolution of groundwater, and groundwater as a geologic agent.

Prerequisites & Notes: ERS 101 or ERS 102, MAT 127.

Credits: 3


ERS 581 – Proposal Writing

A practical course to facilitate development of research proposals. After discussion of key components, students contribute and Peer edit selected proposal elements, with the culmination of a complete proposal at the end of the semester. Can be taken multiple times for credit.

Credits: 1


ERS 588 – Topics in Applied Hydrogeology

Topics will vary and will include ground-water flow modeling, ground-water chemistry and modeling, and data analysis in hydrogeology. A discussion of the methods behind computational tools used in hydrogeology will be followed by the application of software. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites & Notes: COS 101, COS 102, COS 103, ERS 580 and MAT 127 or permission of instructor.

Credits: 3


ERS 591 – Introduction to Meteorology and Climatology

The climatic system, survey of atmospheric behavior and climatic change; meteorological measurements and analysis; formulation of physical principles governing weather and climate with selected applications to small and large scale phenomena. (ERS 491 and ERS 591 are identical courses.)

Prerequisites & Notes: MAT 126, PHY 112 or PHY 122 or permission.

Credits: 3


ERS 602 – Selected Study in Geology II

Tutorial course. Specific topics determined by the instructor’s expertise.

Prerequisites & Notes: permission.

Credits: Ar


ERS 699 – Graduate Thesis

Research Graduate Thesis

Credits: Ar

Tentative Course Schedule

We teach many of our 300- and 400-level courses every other year, so you will need to look forward over your entire academic plan as you schedule courses each year. Course offerings do vary semester to semester from what is listed here depending on demand and faculty availability, but this is a general guide that we follow as closely as possible. Please check with other departments regarding their planned schedules.

Fall Every
Fall Even
Fall Odd
Spring Every
Spring Even
Spring Odd
Summer
Variable


Fall of every year
NFA 117 – Issues and Opportunities

ERS 101 – Introduction to Geology

ERS 102 – Environmental Geology of Maine

ERS 103 – Dynamic Earth

ERS 121 – Humans and Global Change

ERS 191 – Energy in the Earth System

ERS 200 – Earth Systems

ERS 230 – Earth and Climate Science Geomatics

ERS 320 – Research Seminar

ERS 425 – How to Build a Habitable Planet;  also cross-listed as 525

ERS 441 – Glaciers and Our Landscape; also cross-listed as 541

ERS 525 – How to Build a Habitable Planet;  also cross-listed as 425

ERS 541 – Glaciers and Our Landscape; also cross-listed as 441


Fall of even years only

ERS 433 – Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology

ERS 461 – Fluvial Processes in Geomorphology

ERS 491 – Introduction to Meteorology and Climatology; also cross-listed as 591

ERS 552 – Geomorphology

ERS 553 – Quaternary Stratigraphic Record

ERS 591 – Introduction to Meteorology and Climatology; also cross-listed as 491


Fall of odd years only

ERS 316 – Structural Geology

ERS 361 – Principles of Geomorphology

ERS 420 – Computer Scripting for Data Analysis

ERS 480 – Introduction to Hydrogeology; also cross-listed as 580

ERS 542 – Quaternary Environment and Climate Change

ERS 552 – Geomorphology

ERS 580 – Introduction to Hydrogeology; also cross-listed as 480


Spring of every year

ERS 101 – Introduction to Geology

ERS 102 – Environmental Geology of Maine

ERS 103 – Dynamic Earth

ERS 108 – Beaches and Coasts

ERS 201 – Global Environmental Change

ERS 350 – Fresh-Water Flow

ERS 602-1 – Brown Bag Seminar


Spring of even years only

ERS 323 – Extreme Weather

ERS 315 – Principles of Sedimentology and Stratigraphy

ERS 317 – Introduction to Geophysics

ERS 330 – Earth Materials

ERS 340 – Economic Geology

ERS 460 – Marine Geology

ERS 521 – Low Temperature-Pressure Geochem

ERS 581 – Proposal Writing


Spring of odd years only

ERS 240 – The Atmosphere

ERS 312 – Geochemistry

ERS 319 – Geohazards and Humans

ERS 401 – Paleoceanography; also cross-listed with 501

ERS 444 – Introduction to Glaciology; also cross-listed with 544

ERS 451 – Tectonics

ERS 501 – Paleoceanography; also cross-listed with 401

ERS  527 – Isotope Geology

ERS 544 – Introduction to Glaciology; also cross-listed with 444


Summer

ERS 103 – Dynamic Earth

ERS 191 – Energy in the Earth System


Variable Courses – Any Semester

ERS 321 – Problems in Earth and Climate Sciences

ERS 555 – Microstructural Processes

ERS 578 – Metamorphic Petrology

ERS 588 – Topics in Applied Hydrogeology

ERS 602 – Selected Study in Geology; typically several courses of varying topics are offered.