SIE525AssignmentsGarbageBackupFor2017

SIE 525 Information Systems Law

I. Texts
II. Articles and Supplementary Materials
III. Schedule of Lectures and Assignments
IV. Class Process, Delivery of Assignments and Grading
V. Module Assignments



I. Texts

You will read selected chapters out of several texts for this course. You should purchase the second book but the first text and the remainder listed are openly available online. See also Articles and Supplementary Materials.

Book 1. Cyberlaw Online Compendium (free)
Compilation from primarily BitLaw (created by Daniel A. Tysver – http://www.bitlaw.com), Wikipedia, and U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.
A primer covering basic cyberlaw issues from traditional or conventional legal perspectives.

Book 2: Internet Law: Cases and Problems
James Grimmelmann (Aug 2016 version – download for $30 suggested price at http://semaphorepress.com/InternetLaw_overview.html)

Book 3: Information Privacy Fundamentals for Librarians and Information Professionals
Cherie L. Givens

Supplementary Texts (all free):

Intellectual Property: Law & the Information Society-Cases & Materials (free)
James Boyle and Jennifer Jenkins (2014)

Intellectual Property: Law & the Information Society-Selected Statutes and Treatises (free)
James Boyle and Jennifer Jenkins (2014)

Code Version 2.0 (free)
Lawrence Lessig (2008)
http://codev2.cc/

Remix: Making art and commerce thrive in the hybrid economy (free)
Lawrence Lessig (2008)
http://www.bloomsburyacademic.com/remix.htm or see FirstClass Course Info Folder

The Wealth of Networks (free)
Benkler, Yochai (2006)
full book pdf: http://www.benkler.org/Benkler_Wealth_Of_Networks.pdf
chapter pdfs: http://www.benkler.org/wonchapters.html

The Public Domain: Enclosing the Commons of the Mind (free)
James Boyle (2008)
http://www.thepublicdomain.org/download/

III. Approximate Schedule of Lectures and Assignments

See also Distance Session Recordings

Wk Day Date
Topic
Book Reading Assignments*
Extra Assignments
Module
Video Links
1 Tu Jan 17 Introductory Materials [1SlidesInro]


Th Jan 19 (continued) Book 2: Intro (pp.9-13) & Chap 1
Module A
https://connect.maine.edu/p7tsy3203hs/ ,
https://connect.maine.edu/p4eg53b8xak/
2 Tu Jan 24
Liability [2SlidesLiability]
Book 1: Ch 34 &37 Read Liability in Use of GIS
Module B
https://connect.maine.edu/p3rrfv4hn1o
Th Jan 26 Jurisdiction and the Internet [3SlidesJurisdiction]
Book 2: Ch 2, pp. 51-83
Extra credit: Zittrain video
Module C
failed sound – former at
3 Tu Jan 31
Jurisdiction and the Internet
Book 2: Ch 2, pp. 84-120
Module D
Th Feb 2
Intellectual Property Basics [4SlidesIPBasics]
Book 1: Ch 1-8 (pp. 3-15), Book 2: pp. 429-431, Optional-Book 2, pp. 431-502

Intellectual Property: The Basics, by Caseiro (see Backups – chickenSoup)

Module E

 

4 Tu Feb 7
Copyright (continued) & Licenses

Book 1: Ch 9-11 (pp. 15-21), Book 2: pp. 446-466

Module F
Th Feb 9
Patents
Book 1: Ch12-18 (pp.22-30)
Module G
– recording failure
5 Tu Feb 14
Patents
Book 1: Ch 18-22 (pp.30-38)
Module H
– snow day
Th Feb 16
Trademarks
Book 1: Ch 23-31 & Ch 35 (pp.39-51 & 58-60) Term Paper Assigned / Midterm Exam
Module I
https://connect.maine.edu/p2vuygwc48a/
6 Tu Feb 21 Trade Secret

Book 1: Ch 38-40 (pp.67-69)

Module J
https://connect.maine.edu/p2cd3tghzg7/
Th Feb 23
Website Development Issues Book 1: Ch 32-33 & 36 (pp.53-55 & 60-63), Book 2: Ch 6 (pp. 412 – 418)
Module K
7 Tu Feb 28
Public Information: National [7SlidesFOIA] [8SlidesBorders]
Read Weiss summary or Pluijmers/Weiss Borders in Cyberspace
Module L
Th Mr 2
Public Information: State and Local [9SlidesLocalGvnmnt]
Read Ten Ways, GITA Whitepaper and NSGIC Data Sharing Guide
Module M
https://connect.maine.edu/p5c4fhnqyx0/

Spring Break (March 6 – March 18)
8 Tu Mr 21
Open Access to Research Data [6aaSlidesCreativeCommons]

Read Legal Approaches for Open Access to Research Data (pp.1-21) (see Backups – chickenSoup)
Module N
Th Mr 23
Open Access to Research Data [5SlidesDatabase]

Same reference as above – (pp.21-31, 37-41)
Module O

 

9 Tu Mr 28
Self-Help Protections Methods Same reference as above – (pp.31-37, 41-44)
Module P
Th Mr 30
Controlling Private Power: Antitrust and Network Neutrality
Book 2: Ch 9 (pp. 571-573, 586- 587, 587, 611-625)
Module Q
10 Tu Apr 4
Free Speech [10SlidesFreeSpeech]
Book 2: Ch 9 (pp. 557, 561 – 570) ACLU Briefing Paper
Module R
Th Apr 6
Free Speech
Module S
11 Tu Apr 11
Ethics [11SlidesEthics]
Module T
Th Apr 13
Privacy[new slides tba] [12SlidesPrivacy]

Book 3: Ch 3 &/or 2

Data Protection in the United States: Overview
Module U
12 Tu Apr 18
Privacy [25ProtectingIndPrivacy]
Privacy in Our Digital Lives, Wired Article on NSA (see Backups – chickenSoup)
Module V
Th Apr 20
Electronic Evidentiary Admissibility & Expert Testimony [15SlidesEvidence] Evidence from GIS , Mobile Device Evidence & Scientific Experts Article and short experts article in Backups
Module W
13 Tu Apr 25
Security, Encryption, and Management Issues [16SlidesSecurity]
Module X
Th Apr 27
Access to Computers Book 2: Ch xx (pp. xxx – xx)
Module Y
14 Tu May 2
Developing Nation Perspectives [17SlidesDvlpngCntries]
Book 2: Ch xx (pp. xxx – xx)
Module Z
Th May 4
Review
15 May 8
Final Exam Week
Final Exam
IGNORE OLD STUFF BELOW IN GREEN
7 Tu Feb 28
Not finalized beyond herePublic Information: National [7SlidesFOIA] [8SlidesBorders]
Read Weiss summary or Pluijmers/Weiss Borders in Cyberspace
Module L
Th Mr 2
Public Information: State and Local [9SlidesLocalGvnmnt]
Read Ten Ways, GITA Whitepaper and NSGIC Data Sharing Guide
Module M

Spring Break (March 6 – March 18)
8 Tu Mr 21
Open Access to Research Data
[5SlidesDatabse]

Read Legal Approaches for Open Access to Research Data (see backups – chickenSoup)
Module N
Th Mr 23
Open Access to Research Data
[6aaSlidesCreativeCmmns]
Module O

 

9 Tu Mr 28
Self-Help Protections Methods Free Speech [10SlidesFreeSpeech] Book 5: Ch 12 View The Corporation if possible (another link) or see Corp Free Speech Debate
Module P
Th Mr 30
Private Power (continued)
ACLU Briefing Paper
Module Q
10 Tu Apr 4
Free Speech
Ethics [11SlidesEthics]
Implementing G I Technologies Ethically
Module O
Th Apr 6
Free Speech
Privacy [SlidesPrivacy] [12SlidesPrivacy]

Book 1: Ch 12 plus Book 5: Ch 11

Engaging Privacy & IT: Exec Summary (see First Class)
11 Tu Apr 11
EthicsPrivacy [13SlidesPrivacyGeo] [14SlidesPrivacyUbiq]
View Cory Doctorow Video plus Wired article in FirstClass folder
Th Apr 13
Privacy
Privacy continued

Outcomes Assessment Assignment
Module P
12 Tu Apr 18
Privacy Evidentiary Admissibility [15SlidesEvidence]
Evidence from GIS & Scientific Experts article (FC folder)
Th Apr 20
Evidentiary Admissibility [15SlidesEvidence]Security, Encryption, and IP Management Issues [16SlidesSecurity]

Book 1: Ch 13

Mapping the Risks (Rand), Cybersecurity Today and Tomorrow (free download), Info Technology for Counterterrorism (free summary)
Module Q
13 Tu Apr 25
Security, Encryption, and IP Management Issues [16SlidesSecurity] (continued)

One of: Next Generation Connectivity OR Open Source Software Business Models OR File-Sharing and Copyright

Module R
Th Apr 27
Access to ComputersInternational Law and Trade Book 1: Ch 14 plus
Book 6: Chap 6&9
EU Database Directive Debate (Boyle) and Follow-Up, Is Bayh-Dole Good for Developing Countries?
Module S
14 Tu May 2
Access to ComputersDeveloping Nation Perspectives [17SlidesDvlpngCntries]
Integrating IP and Development Policy, ICT: What Works, Online Delivery of Land Titles
Module T
Th May 4
Review
15 May 8
Final Exam Week
Final Exam


IV. Class Process and Assignments

1. Post Your Regular Module Reponses on FirstClass: Each module assignment below requires each student to respond to all of the questions posed and post the responses in the FirstClass Assignment folder by the day and time indicated. That is, posting is required by both on-campus and on-line students prior to the on-campus class period in which the material will be discussed. Label each and every posting with your last name followed by the module number (e.g. Smith – Module A). Within your submission list the entire question before providing your response for each question (e.g. A1, A2, etc.)

Be concise yet thoughtful and use complete sentences. In some instances a several paragraph response to a question may be appropriate. In other instances, a hundred-words question response may be adequate. You will be able to see compiled responses from all students posted by the instructor on the morning of the days when we meet. See also the Module Formatting Instructions

2. Moderator Responsibilities: Each student, whether on-campus or at a distance, is assigned to moderate the class discussion for one or more modules. You should read all of your peers’ responses prior to class and be familiar with them. You may be given anywhere from 0 minutes to 75 minutes to discuss the questions depending on other ground to be covered during the class period. As moderator your role is not to give a lecture on what you or other people have stated in their written responses but to engage all other members of class to the extent possible in a discussion of their responses and affiliated issues raised in the readings. In some instances you may have time to call on only two or three classmates to discuss their responses but certainly your goal should be to engage as many classmates as possible. Be ready to ask further questions of your peers on the material if the discussion lags.
Editor Responsibilities: <NOT GERMANE IN SPRING 2017> After your moderator session you will summarize in writing the discussion of the module. Each editor will publish a short summary (no more than one page or 500 words per question, whichever is shorter) that describes the essence of our class discussion findings and conclusions for each question. This summary should address issues raised in the initial student written responses as well as in the face-to-face discussions. I highly recommend that you prepare this summary immediately after the session you moderate. If you have a co-editor you may work together or split up the questions. The summaries are due on April xx so that these summaries may be used to review the course during our last class session. Post your class summary as follows: <your last name> – SUMMARY OF MODULE <xx>.

3. Book Review Assignment: Read an additional book during the semester from an instructor suggested list (or you nominate another). After the selection has been approved by the instructor, read the book and then write a summary and review paper on the book that concludes with your own reflections on the issues raised in the book. See the Book Review Instructions The paper is due on or prior to May 4. The list of books and explicit instructions are <forthcoming>.

4. Personal Module Compilation: Your module compilation consists of all of your personal module assignment responses prepared and submitted throughout the semester accumulated into a single document. I suggest that you keep a running Word, rtf, or similar document adding on your submissions as we proceed through the semester. Responses to all modules must be included even if you miss responding on time for a specific class due to illness or otherwise. You may want to review and edit your modules prior to final submission at the end of the semester by considering also the insights supplied by the class discussion but no module question response should exceed 500 words or a single page, whichever is shorter. The journal is due on May 4 and should be posted as follows: <your last name> – SIE 525 Module Compilation

Grading

Module Assignments – 20%
Moderator Participation and Class Participation – 20%
Book Review – 20%
Mid-term Exam – 20%
Final Exam – 20%



V. Module Assignments
Module Formatting Instructions

Module A – Introduction [optional]
Moderator/Editor: Harlan Onsrud

Assignment: Read Book 2: Introduction (pp.9-13) and Ch 1 [NOTE: This written assignment is optional but it is highly recommended that you read this introductory material regardless.]
The critical questions are:
A-1 After reviewing the syllabus and considering your own career aspirations, which information systems law issue do you think is most critical for you to understand thoroughly by the end of the course?
A-2 Describe some technical aspect of the Internet of which you were unaware of prior to reading Chapter 1 of Book 2 or describe some aspect that was particularly innovative when developed.
A-3 Briefly summarize the core theory espoused in the piece included from Lawrence Lessig or the piece from Jonathan Zittrain.
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm Mon Feb 6
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm Mon Feb 6

Module B – Liability
Moderator/Editor: Oghenetega Dibie, Jennifer Bonnet

Assignment: Read Liability in Use of GIS
The critical questions are:
B-1 Considering the article on Liability in the Use of GIS, how can you best minimize your liability exposure in the future in your delivery of information software, products and services to others?
B-2 Under what circumstances should you be held responsible for damages to others if they are led astray by inaccurate or incomplete digital information that you provided?
B-3 Raise and reflect on one or more questions or issues related to the readings that you most like to discuss with the rest of the class. (Including the liability chapters from Book 1).
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm Mon Feb 6
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm Mon Feb 6

Module C – Jurisdiction 1
Moderator/Editor: Tushar Gautam, Amanda Hoogestraat
Assignment: Book 2: Ch 2,pp. 51-83; Extra Credit: View Jonathan Zittrain Video starting at 13 minutes in at http://littlegreenfootballs.com/page/298188_Be_Careful_What_You_Ask_For_
The critical questions are:
C-1 Under Section A of Chapter 2, select one of the short essays at the beginning of the chapter (see pp.51-61 or p.67) and respond to at least two of the questions at the end of the essay. Note: Begin your response with the title of the piece, the author, and then each question to which you are responding.
C-2 Under Section B of Chapter 2, respond briefly to the questions on p. 75.
C-3 Extra Credit: Raise and reflect on one or more additional questions or issues related to the Zittrain video that you would like most to discuss with the rest of the class.
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm Wed Jan 25 which is the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm Mon Jan 30

Module D – Jurisdiction 2
Moderator/Editor: Roderic Oconnor, Billy Jordan
Assignment: Book 2: Ch 2,pp. 84-120
The critical questions are:
(p.84-91)
D-1. Does Equustek do an appropriate job of balancing domestic concerns with the interests of other countries and their residents?
D-2. Would an injunction limited to searches from Canadian IP addresses be broader or narrower than one limited to google.ca? Would it be easier or harder for Google to implement? Would it be more or less respectful of oth- er jurisdictions?
D-3. Equustek shows how search engines are a potential point of control for en- forcing laws online. Are there others? The Stop Online Piracy Act, intro- duced in the House in 2011, but dropped by its sponsors in the face of mas- sive online and offline protests in early 2012, would have increased copy- right enforcement by allowing injunctions against search engines, payment networks, advertising platforms, and domain-name servers, requiring them to cut off service to specific identified “foreign infringing sites.” What could these entities do to reduce infringement? Are there risks to this kind of en- forcement strategy? Why did online activists argue that SOPA would “break the Internet?”
(pp. 92-93)
D-4 Does the availability of extradition extend countries’ legal reach? How does it affect the global nature of the Internet?
(pp. 93-96)
D-5 Initially, the Yahoo! litigation sounds familiar, pitting United States free- speech values versus French hate-speech laws. Why is it culturally important to France to prohibit trafficking in Nazi memorabilia? Can you think of any material that would be clearly offensive in the United States but considered innocuous in other countries?
D-6. When Cyril Houri enters the picture and starts talking about geolocation, the story takes a surprising turn. What is geolocation and why does it work? Why did it help persuade Judge Gomez to rule against Yahoo!? What other uses does it have?
D-7. How important is the location of Yahoo!’s servers in this story? How important is the location of Yahoo!’s various offices?
D-8. This brings us to the central theoretical point that Goldsmith and Wu make: the Internet is becoming “bordered” rather than “borderless.” What does that mean? How will the Internet in the United States differ from the Inter- net in France? Have you personally seen examples of the bordered Internet?
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm Mon Jan 30 which is the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm Mon Jan 30

Module E – Intellectual Property Basics
Moderator/Editor: Nikhil Patil, Carl Lolar
Assignment: (a) Intellectual Property: The Basics, by Caseiro (see FirstClass Course Info folder) Note: Another primer on just U.S. copyright is at https://copyright.columbia.edu/basics/copyright-quick-guide.html. If you desire to compare and contrast some intellectual property law basics from other countries, see Australia http://www.ipaustralia.gov.au and Canada http://cipo.ic.gc.ca
(b) Book 1: pp. 3-15,
(c) Book 2: pp. 429-431, Optional: pp. 431-502

The critical questions are:
E-1 Read “Intellectual Property: The Basics” by Chris Caseiro. (If you prefer viewing a series of short videos for your primer, check out https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RQOJgEA5e1k) Explain the primary differences between the protections offered by trademark, copyright, patent and trade secret. Discuss one or more things you learned or thought was interesting.
E-2 Discuss one or more additional things about Copyright you learned or thought was interesting from Book 1, pp.3-15.
E-3 Discuss one or more additional things about Copyright you learned or thought was interesting from Book 2, pp.429-431 or through p. 502.
Extras: Popular Videos Critiquing Aspects of U.S. Copyright Law include – Copyright: Forever Plus One Day https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tk862BbjWx4 (more on Disney at https://priceonomics.com/how-mickey-mouse-evades-the-public-domain/) and Copyright Explained in Five Minutes or Lesshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-wx6kLFaZ8 and many others.
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm Mon Feb 6

Module F – Copyright
Moderator/Editor: Donnie Rice, Todd Metzler
Assignment: Book 1: pp. 8-10, pp. 15-21, Book 2: pp. 446-466 (Optional: pp. 467-480 on Fair Use)
The critical questions are:
F-1 What ownership assumptions should one make when copying material off of the Internet? Do the assumptions of the law comport with what studies show or what you think are efficient for the economy and the well being of society generally?
F-2 U.S. Fair Use Law: Numerous graphics and photos were used in the comic book book titled Bound by Law? by Aoki, Boyle and Jenkins found at http://www.thepublicdomain.org/comic/. This material was used without asking permission of authors or publishers of the original works. Is this legal? Why? Is this ethical? Why?
F-3 For one attempt by a community to define “fair use” in relation to classes of media, see Documentary Filmmakers’ Statement of Best Practices in Fair Use at http://cmsimpact.org/code/documentary-filmmakers-statement-of-best-practices-in-fair-use/ Are such community attempts at setting standards likely to be considered seriously by the courts?
F-4 Read the Take Down notice example at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Online_Copyright_Infringement_Liability_Limitation_Act. Does this seem like a reasonable procedure? Why is the recording industry trying to legislate something stronger?
F-5 Read Book 2, pp.446-447 and then read the material on one of the following cases on licensing copyrighted material: Field v. Google, Vernor v. Autodesk or Jacobsen v. Katzer. Choose one of the questions following the case you chose and answer the question. Include in your response submitted to FirstClass the name of the case, the text of the selected question, and your analysis.
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm Mon Feb 6

Module G – Patents 1
Moderator/Editor: Brad Shepherd, Miguel Montiel
Assignment: Book 1: Ch 12-18 (pp. 22-30)
The critical questions are:
G-1 List the four major requirements that make an invention patentable and briefly describe each requirement.
G-2 What are the rights granted under a patent?
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the Monday evening before class.

Module H – Patents 2
Moderator/Editor: Devon Stetson, Colin Warhola
Assignment: Book 1: Ch 19-22 (pp. 31-38)
The critical questions are:
H-1 Can the functional design of an innovative new mousetrap be protected though a design patent? Why? Where are design patents most likely to arise in the information technology industry?
H-2 If you wanted to file for a patent for a novel invention in the US and in several additional nations, what are considerations you might want to address in the timing of those applications?
H-3 Consult http://www.bitlaw.com/software-patent/index.html Under what conditions is software patentable? From your perspective should software be patentable? Why?
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the Monday evening before class.

Module I – Trademarks
Moderator/Editor: Yuanwei Wang, Aaron Burmeister
Assignment: Book 1: Ch 23-31 & Ch 35 (pp.39-51 & 58-60)
The critical questions are:
I-1 Discuss the strength of the term Burger King in its use for identifying a fast food restaurant chain. Was this a good choice for naming the restaurant chain?
I-2 Make up a name for augmented reality eye glasses that your company has just developed and wants to trademark. How would you determine if another company might already use the name for eye wear or headgear and thereby possesses a common law trademark potentially affecting or causing potential confusion with your product?
I-3 Name the three benefits of federal trademark registration that you believe would be the most important for your innovative augmented reality glasses.
I-4 If I have a federally registered trademark in the name of Onsrud for my apple orchard business, what would be the strength of my case for trademark dilution against Apple Computers if it started selling a new line of Onsrud computers?
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the Monday evening before class.

Module J – Trade Secrets
Moderator/Editor: Tega Dibe, Jennifer Bonnet
Assignment: Book 1: Ch 38-40 (pp.67-69)
The critical questions are:
J-1 Name the three factors included in most definitions of a trade secret
J-2 What are the primary benefits of protection through trade secret as opposed to copyright or patent? How would you go about securing the protection?
J-3 What are primary drawbacks or limitations of protection through trade secret as opposed to copyright or patent?
J-4 Recent federal legislation was recently passed that would effect trade secret law. See http://newsbreaks.infotoday.com/NewsBreaks/Congress-Approves-Federal-Protection-for-Trade-Secrets-110632.asp What effect will this new law have?
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the Monday evening before class.

Module K – Web Site Legal Issues
Moderator/Editor: Gautum , Hoogestraat
Assignment: Book 1: Ch 32-33 & 36 (pp.53-55 & 60-63), Book 2: Ch 6 (pp. 412 – 418)
The critical questions are:
K-1 What are the five major categories of legal concerns, as listed by the author, that arise when developing a website ? Without being familiar with this material, which legal constraints or concerns might persons most likely breach unknowingly when developing their own website?
K-2 Assuming that you are involved in a dispute over a domain name whereby another U.S. company is trying to force your small firm to give up a domain name, would you rather have the dispute resolved through the U.S. court system or through ICANN’s Uniform Domain Dispute Resolution Policy (pp. 416-418) and why?

On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the Monday evening before class.

Module L – Freedom of Information in Government Public Records
Moderator/Editor: O’Connor , Jordan
Assignment: Weiss summary or Pluijmers/Weiss Borders in Cyberspace, Read the Introduction, Chapter 1 and the final sections of Borders in Cyberspace. The report arrives at conclusions and recommendations regarding government public access policies. Assess these results and recommendations.
The critical questions are:
L-1 To what extent are the “conclusions” supportable by the evidence? Do they make sense?
L-2 Are the “recommendations” supportable in terms of good public policy? Why?
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the Monday evening before class.

Module M – Access to State Local Government Records
Moderator/Editor: Patil , Lolar
Assignment: Ten Ways, GITA Whitepaper and NSGIC Data Sharing Guide
The critical questions are:
M-1 To what extent should the laws governing access to and use of federal agency digital records also apply to state and local government digital records? Why?
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the Monday evening before class.

Module N – Open Access Concepts
Moderator/Editor: Rice , Montiel
Assignment: Legal Approaches for Open Access to Research Data (pp. 1-21) See Backups – chickenSoup
The critical questions are:
N-1 In the list of definitions as used in the article, why are facts distinguished from data and datasets?
N-2 Describe the differences between the status of data being in the commons, open commons and public domain.
N-3 If a dataset is advertised and offered as being legally interoperable using the definition in this article, does that mean that the dataset may not be sold by the owner but only freely shared? Why?
N-4 The challenges of enforcing copyright controls over downstream uses of data in international contexts are discussed on pp. 14-21. Reflect on something you learned or found of most interest in this material.
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the Monday evening before class.

Module O – Database Rights & Government Removal of IP Restrictions
Moderator/Editor: Shepherd , Warhola
Assignment: Legal Approaches for Open Access to Research Data (pp. 21-31, 37-41) See Backups – chickenSoup
The critical questions are:
O-1 Assume that the business you own gathers data from across the web and from other multiple sources and then offers an online service that generates results or answers by querying that data. You charge customers a high per use fee or lower monthly fee for your service. Would you prefer setting up this service in a jurisdiction with sui generis database rights protections? Why or why not?
O-2 The articles lists several mechanisms by which governments may remove intellectual property rights controlling the use of research data. (i.e. see Sections 3.1.1, 3.1.2 and 3.1.3). Choose one of the mechanisms and describe the challenges for a government in its implementation as compared to the other described methods.
O-3 The authors Conclusions and Recommendations concerning Legal Mechanisms that Promote Open Access and Legal Interoperability are stated in Section 4 (pp.37-42). Which of the legal mechanisms suggested in Table 1 are you most likely to be able to implement as an individual during your career? Do you envision yourself doing so and why?
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the Monday evening before class.

Module P – Self-Help Approaches
Moderator/Editor: Stetson , Burmeister
Assignment: Legal Approaches for Open Access to Research Data. (See Backups – chickenSoup): pp.1-21)
The critical questions are:
P-1 The Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY) is the most widely used and recommended by the academic community of all the CC Licenses. Why do the authors NOT recommend its use with research data?
P-2 The authors provide minimum recommendations for open access research repositories in Section 4.2. What additional recommendations might you recommend or what edits might you suggest for these recommendations?
P-3 As a student completing a graduate research project at the University of Maine where you have compiled substantial data supporting your research, where would you archive the research data such that the data would be linked from your published electronic thesis, the data likely would still be there in 50 years, and others could efficiently find it through universal web searches and through metadata searches? Would students, faculty and other university researchers benefit from the facility recommended in Section 4.3?
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the Monday evening before class.

Module Q – Controlling Private Power
Moderator/Editor: Wang , Bonnet
Assignment: Book 2: Ch 9 (pp. 571-573, 586-587, 587, 611-625)
The critical questions are:
Q-1 Antitrust: What is the basis for or what are the potential arguments that Google is violating Section 2 of the Sherman Act? What are the arguments that it is not violating the Act?
Q-2 Net Neutrality (p. 587): The most recent formal statement of Federal Communication Commission (FCC) on protecting and promoting the open internet (pp.611-620) is critiqued by dissenting Commissioner Ajit Pai (pp. 620-624). Which arguments are more convincing to you and why?
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the Monday evening before class.

Module R – Free Speech
Moderator/Editor: xxx , xxx
Assignment: ACLU Briefing Paper and Book 2: Ch 9 (pp. 557, 561 – 570)
The critical questions are:
R-1 From the ACLU Briefing Paper, list three key ideas or points relative to free speech on the Internet that you think are important.
R-2 Chapter 9 of Book 2 asks, if a private Internet Service Provider (ISP) abuses its position, what can its users or the government do about it? In the case of Zhang vs. Baidu.com Inc, the argument is made that the U.S. Constitutional First Amendment right of free speech fully immunizes search-engine results from most, if not all, kinds of civil liability and government regulation in the U.S. Thus it protects the rights of Baidu (the leading Chinese search engine company) to advocate for systems of government other than democracy (in China or elsewhere). Are Baidu’s editorial policies good for users or bad for users? If you don’t like the company’s policies what are your alternatives for finding the information you desire? Should search engines that rank websites be required to disclose how they rank web sites?
R-3 No one who has merely received classified information and distributed it, such as a news organization, has been successfully prosecuted under the U.S. Espionage Act of 1917. Why not? Why hasn’t new legislation been enacted to make it easier to close down operations like Wikileaks?
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the Monday evening before class.

Module S – Free Speech
Moderator/Editor: xxx , xxx
Assignment: View The Corporation if possible (previously free on web but now available thru various pay per view outlets) or see Corp Free Speech Debate
The critical questions are:
S-1 If we allow great deference to free speech on the Internet, what are the best means for controlling bad behavior (e.g. spam, obscene material, defamation, scams)?
S-2 What are the arguments for and against interpreting the bill of rights such that corporations are able to take advantage of constitutional free speech rights?
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the Monday evening before class.

Module T – Ethics
Moderator/Editor: xxx , xxx
Assignment: Implementing G I Technologies Ethically
The critical questions are:
T-1 Reflect on differences between legal and ethical conduct within the context of the use and creation of digital data, products and services. Additionally, provide examples where the two are not synonymous.
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the Monday evening before class.

Module U – Privacy
Moderator/Editor: xxx , xxx
Assignment: Book 3, Chap 1 Intro and Chap 3 on Major U.S. Privacy Protections: Laws, Regulators and Approaches to Enforcement. Alternatively or additionally, read “Practical Law – Data protection in the United States: Overview” http://us.practicallaw.com/6-502-0467. Book 3, Chap 3 discusses privacy laws by sector whereas the second reference discusses many of the same national laws but discusses them organized under a series of 24 questions.
The critical questions are:
U-1 What rights in privacy did you assume or believe you had before reading the material? Did your view change and in regard to what issue(s)?
U-2 Raise and reflect on one or more questions or issues related to the readings that you most would like to discuss with the rest of the class.
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the Monday evening before class.

ASSIGNMENTS HAVE NOT YET BEEN FINALIZED BEYOND THIS POINT

Module V – Personal Information Privacy
Moderator/Editor: xxx , xxx
Assignment: Privacy in Our Digital Lives, Wired Article on NSA (see Backups – chickenSoup)
The critical questions are:
V-1 xxx
V-2 xxx
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the Monday evening before class.

Module W – Evidentiary Admissibility
Moderator/Editor: xxx , xxx
Assignment: Evidence from GIS & Scientific Experts Article and short Experts article in Backups
The critical questions are:
W-1 xxx
W-2 xxx
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the Monday evening before class.

Module X – Cyber Security
Moderator/Editor: xxx , xxx
Assignment: Richard M. Harrison, 2016, Strategic Primer – Cyber Security, Foreign Policy Council,
http://www.afpc.org/publication_listings/viewPolicyPaper/3148 and Mapping the Risks (Rand)
The critical questions are:
X-1 xxx
X-2 xxx
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the Monday evening before class.

Module Y – Access to Computers
Moderator/Editor: xxx , xxx
Assignment: xxx
The critical questions are:
Y-1 xxx
Y-2 xxx
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the Monday evening before class.

Module Z – Developing Nation Perspectives
Moderator/Editor: xxx , xxx
Assignment: xxx
The critical questions are:
Z-1 xxx
Z-2 xxx
On-campus students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the evening before class.
Distance students – Respond to these questions on FirstClass by 8:00 pm on the Monday evening before class.

IGNORE MATERIAL BELOW IN GREEN

Public Domain and Related Concepts

Assignment: Book 8: Ch 3, Moglen Maine Talk
The critical questions are:
H-1 What does Boyle mean by the second enclosure movement?

H-2 View the four 8-minute Lessig videos on Free Culture < http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWR6eiiBhf8, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LDG4O6Vk9E8, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kozx-7tobr4, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fipyzsfX2Hw> (transcript without slides ). What arguments do you find most convincing? Why? Least convincing? Why? (If curious, see also his video titled Open at at http://blip.tv/lessig/episode-3749213 for his changing perspective.)
H-3 Moglen states: “The free sharing of scientific information is the essence of Western science. And without the concept of the free sharing of information …. the advance of knowledge would be either impossible or impossibly burdened.” “If you could feed everyone on earth at the cost of baking one loaf and pressing a button, what would be the moral case for charging more for bread than some people could afford to pay?” Reflect on or respond to these statements in the context of the distribution of digital knowledge works.
All students respond to these questions on FirstClass before 8:00 PM on the evening before class

Module I – Sharing Economies and Peer Production
Moderator/Editor: Yuanwei Wang,
Assignment: Tragedy of Info Commons plus Book 6: Ch 6 on Commercial and Sharing Economies & Ch 8 on Economy Lessons plus Book 7: Ch 3 on Peer Production and Sharing & Ch 4 on Economies of Social Production
The critical questions are:
I-1 What is meant by “commons” in the context of the Internet? Considering the Tragedy of the Commons article, how can there be a “tragedy” if electronic data and products are not consumed in their use?
I-2 In Book 6, what is your perspective on whether parallel commercial and sharing economies are possible?
I-3 In the Book 7 chapters on peer production and the economics of social production, discuss one of more things you learned or thought was interesting
All students respond to these questions on FirstClass before 8:00 PM on the evening before class

Module J – Value of the Commons in the Context of Science
Moderator/Editor: Nancy Southern
Assignment: Video: What if the Web Really Worked for Science? I & II , Pollock Value of the Public Domain, Nelson, The Market Economy and Scientific Commons (Optional: Open Access to Research Data – FC folder)
The critical questions are:
J-1 View the video by James Boyle on What if the Web Really Worked for Science? (Note: A question and answer session covers the last quarter of the video which you may skip.). List three key points from his presentation that you think are interesting or important.
J-2 Read the article by Pollock or the article by Nelson. List three key points, ideas or concepts from one of these works that you think are interesting or important.
All students respond to these questions on FirstClass before 8:00 PM on the evening before class

Module K – Freedom of Information in Government Public Records
Moderator/Editor: Katrina Wynn
Assignment: Weiss summary or Pluijmers/Weiss Borders in Cyberspace, Read the Introduction, Chapter 1 and the final sections of Borders in Cyberspace. The report arrives at conclusions and recommendations regarding government public access policies. Assess these results and recommendations.
The critical questions are:
K-1 To what extent are the “conclusions” supportable by the evidence? Do they make sense?
K-2 Are the “recommendations” supportable in terms of good public policy? Why?
All students respond to these questions on FirstClass before 8:00 PM on the evening before class

Module L – Access to Government Records
Moderator/Editor: Joel Whitney
Assignment: Ten Ways and GITA Whitepaper
The critical questions are:
L-1 To what extent should the laws governing access to and use of federal agency digital records also apply to state and local government digital records? Why?
All students respond to these questions on FirstClass before 8:00 PM on the evening before class

Module M – Free Speech
Moderator/Editor: Eric Brown
Assignment: Book 5: Ch 12, view the The Corporation if possible (sometimes instant Netflicks)
The critical questions are:
M-1 If we allow great deference to free speech on the Internet, what are the best means for controlling bad behavior (e.g. spam, obscene material, defamation, scams)?
M-2 What are the arguments for and against interpreting the bill of rights such that corporations are able to take advantage of constitutional free speech rights?
All students respond to these questions on FirstClass before 8:00 PM on the evening before class

Module N – Free Speech
Moderator/Editor: Allison Flynn
Assignment: ACLU Briefing Paper
The critical questions are:
N-1 From the ACLU Briefing Paper, list three key ideas or points relative to free speech on the Internet that you think are important.
N-2 Briefly discuss your perspectives or reactions to these concepts.
All students respond to these questions on FirstClass before 8:00 PM on the evening before class

Module O – Ethics
Moderator/Editor: Zachery Schiller
Assignment: Implementing G I Technologies Ethically
The critical questions are:
O-1 Reflect on differences between legal and ethical conduct within the context of the use and creation of digital data, products and services. Alternatively, provide examples where the two are not synonymous.
All students respond to these questions on FirstClass before 8:00 PM on the evening before class

Module P – Privacy
Moderator/Editor:
Assignment: Book 3, Chap 1 Intro and Chap 3 on Major U.S. Privacy Protections: Laws, Regulators and Approaches to Enforcement. Alternatively or additionally, read “Practical Law – Data protection in the United States: Overview” http://us.practicallaw.com/6-502-0467. Book 3, Chap 3 discusses privacy laws by sector whereas the second reference discusses many of the same national laws but discusses them organized under a series of 24 questions.
The critical questions are:
P-1 What rights in privacy did you assume or believe you had before reading the material? Did your view change and in regard to what issue(s)?
P-2 Raise and reflect on one or more questions or issues related to the readings that you most would like to discuss with the rest of the class.
All students respond to these questions on FirstClass before 8:00 PM on the evening before class

Module Q – Cybersecurity
Moderator/Editor: Katrina Wynn
Assignment: Book 1: Ch 13, Mapping the Risks (Rand), Cybersecurity Today and Tomorrow (free download), Info Technology for Counterterrorism (free summary) (Optional: Surveillance & Unmasking NSA – both in FC folder)
The critical questions are:
Q-1 Has the widespread availability of U.S. government records including geographic data made the nation more or less safe? Justify your response.
Q-2 Raise and reflect on one or more questions or issues related to the readings that you most like to discuss with the rest of the class.
All students respond to these questions on FirstClass before 8:00 PM on the evening before class

Module R – Emerging Intellectual Property and Technology Access Issues
Moderator/Editor: Joel Whitney

Assignment: Read the executive summary, introduction and conclusion of one of the following articles and skim additional portions (all in the FirstClass folder)
1. Next Generation Connectivity: A review of broadband Internet transitions and policy from around the world
2. Inventory and Analysis of Open Source Software Business Models
3. File-Sharing and Copyright
The critical questions are:
R-1 What are the major points made by the article or what are the conclusions arrived at?
R-2 Raise and reflect on one or more questions or issues related to the readings that you most would like to discuss with the rest of the class.
All students respond to these questions on FirstClass before 8:00 PM on the evening before class

Module S – International IP Policy
Moderator/Editor: Eric Brown
Assignment: Book 1: Ch 14 on International Cyberlaw plus Book 6: Chap 9 & 10 on Reforming Law plus EU Database Directive Debate (Boyle) and Follow-Up, Is Bayh-Dole Good for Developing Countries?
The critical questions are:
S-1 Give some examples from Book 1 Chapter 14 of differences you see between U.S. law and the law of other countries in respect to trademark, copyright, patents, trade secrets, privacy or contracts.
S-2 Which side of the debate in the Financial Times is more convincing? Why?
S-3 Raise and reflect on one or more questions or issues related to the Bayh-Dole reading that you most would like to discuss with the rest of the class.
All students respond to these questions on FirstClass before 8:00 PM on the evening before class

Module T – Developing Nation Perspectives on Information and Communication Technologies
Moderator/Editor: Allison Flynn
Assignment: Integrating IP and Development Policy, ICT: What Works, Online Delivery of Land Titles (Optional: Echoupal and IP&International Development – both in FC folder)
The critical questions are:
T-1 Raise and reflect on one or more questions or issues related to the readings that you most would like to discuss with the rest of the class.
T-2 Return to the Pre-Test that you took online at the beginning of this course. Think of something you learned in this course that was unexpected. Write a True-False question that you probably would have gotten wrong had you guessed at the answer prior to taking this course.
All students respond to these questions on FirstClass before 8:00 PM on the evening before class

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