COS 490: Lectures and Assignments

COS 490 Computers, Ethics and Society

For this course, you will read several complete books as well as selected chapters out of other books and some articles. You should purchase through online facilities the books indicated in the assignments below. The full titles of the books and annotations for each book may be found in the course bibliography. You will also find links to the bios of the book authors here.

Approximate Schedule of Lectures and Assignments

 

 

Wk Day Date
Topic
Book Reading Assignments
Module
Misc
1 T Sept 4 Course Introduction

Th Sept 6 Social Issues and Professional Practice (ACM-IEEE) Outcomes Assessment Assignment  Outcomes Assessment Quests 1-16
 2 T Sept 11  Outcomes Assessment Quests 17-32
Th Sept 13  Outcomes Assessment Quests 33-52
 3 T Sept 18  Outcomes Assessment Quests 53-69
TH Sept 20 I. History of Cyber Society The Innovators
Ch 1-4
Module A
4 T Sept 25 The Innovators
Ch 5-8
Module B
TH Sept 27 The Innovators
Ch 9-12
Module C
5 T Oct 2 II. Cyberlaw/Internet Law Cyberlaw Compendium: Copyright
Module D
TH Oct 4 Midterm exam posted Cyberlaw Compendium: Patent

Module E

6 T Oct 9 Fall Break
TH Oct 11 Midterm topics due Cyberlaw Cmp: Trademark & Trade Secret Module F
7 T Oct 16 III. Crime and Security Future Crimes
Ch 1-4
Module G
TH Oct 18
Future Crimes
Ch 5-8
Module H
8 T Oct 23  Future Crimes

Ch 9-13
Module I
TH Oct 25 Future Crimes
Ch 14-18
Module J
9 T Oct 30 IV. Privacy    Info Privacy Fundamentals
Ch 1-4
Module K
TH Nov 1
Info Privacy Fundamentals
Ch 5-7
Module L
10 T Nov 6 V. Cyber Society Perspectives on Business and  Education
Future of Work
Ch 1-8
Module M
TH Nov 8
Weapons of Math Destrctn
Ch Intro-7
Module N
 11 T Nov 13 Weapons of Math Destrctn
Ch 8-Afterward
Module O
TH Nov 15 One World Schoolhouse
pp. 1-126
Module P
 12 T Nov 20
One World Schoolhouse
pp. 127-254
Module Q
TH Nov 22
Thanksgiving Break
 13 T Nov 27 VI. Society: Psychology, Ethics, and U.S. Political System Yes ! Scientific Proven Ways
Ch 1-50
Module R
TH Nov 29 Everybody Lies Ch 1-8 Module S
14 T Dec 4
The Perfect Weapon Ch Preface-4 Module T
TH Dec 6 The Perfect Weapon Ch 5-9  Module U
 15 T Dec 11
 The Perfect Weapon Ch 10-Afterward
Module V
TH Dec 13 VII. Project Teamwork Course Review
M Dec 17 Final Exam Week

 

Final Exam
Tues Dec 18
9:30 am

I. Class Communications

  • Assignments: While assignments are made on the Lectures and Assignments web page, the course will use Blackboard for delivery of completed module report and module discussant assignments. Blackboard interfaces are automatically established for all UMaine courses each semester. Find Blackboard at https://mycampus.maine.edu (the yellow and black Bb icon). All officially enrolled students are automatically enrolled into the Blackboard course. The course should appear as active in your Blackboard course list. Click on COS 490 Computers, Ethics and Society.
  • Class Notices: The instructor will occasionally make announcements to all students on the primary Blackboard course page. The course website is also accessible from the left menu.
  • Exams, End of Semester Products and Any Delivered Files: Any class response that requires a file to be attached must be sent to cos490@maine.edu.

II. Module Assignments: Module Reports and Module Discussant Questions

Although all students should strive to read and take notes on all book chapters covered in the course, you will prepare module reports on only certain assigned chapters or portions of chapters. The class as a group will thereby outline and summarize the entire content of each book read in the course. Other students prior to each class period will submit a module discussant question. Most students will prepare a Module Report or Module Discussant Question for each class period or perhaps every other class period.

A. Module Reports: Your regular module assignment reports will be submitted in Blackboard under the Course Messages link under Assignments. Keep a single running document of ALL of your Module Reports throughout the semester since you will be required to submit this compilation as well at the end of the semester. Each Module Report consists of two written elements and an oral element:

1. Written Module Report – Both written elements of your response are due on or before 8:00 pm the evening before the class session in which the Module will be discussed. Number and label the two elements of your written response as follows:

(a) Outline of Response (5 pts) – Outline the key points in any chapter or portion of chapter assigned. Your outline per chapter should be about 100 words. Provide 4 to 10 major talking points or topics that you want to report on to the rest of the class covering the reading material. Number these talking points starting with 1. If you need to use sub-headings under a talking point, use dashes (-). If you need to use sub-sub-headings, uses asterisks (*).  Do NOT use any formatting in your response and do NOT use automated numbering or bullets! The outline of your response is the only portion of the two-part module response that will be forwarded by the instructor to your fellow students prior to class.

 (b) Full Response (20 pts) – Flesh out the outline as set forth under (a). That is, under each of your numbered or bulleted points in the outline provide a discussion of those points. Think in terms of the statements you will highlight in your oral classroom report to the rest of the class. Your full response discussing the outline points should be about 500 words but may be much longer at your discretion

See some example written responses that contain appropriate headings and no formatting as required. Whether or not delivered on time, all assigned modules MUST be completed and delivered eventually to avoid receiving an incomplete in the course.

Submission of Written Module Report to Blackboard: Your written Module Report with the title of the topic and both elements separately labeled (i.e. OUTLINE and FULL RESPONSE) must be delivered in plain text with no formatting except for line breaks between paragraphs.

• In the Blackboard left menu, go to Assignments > Module Report and Discussant Submissions > Create Message
• Click the TO button > select ONLY Harlan Onsrud (instructor) > click the arrow to add him as the only recipient of the message
• The subject of your message MUST be in the form of your last name followed by the module designator, chapter and portion assigned to you (e.g. Smith – Module A Report, Chapter 3, Part 2).
• Paste the module report into the text window (There must be NO formatting except for new lines and never attach a file under Module Report and Discussant Submissions)
• Click SUBMIT to send the assignment.

2. Oral Presentation of Module Report (15 pts) – Your goal is to teach the class the core material or ideas covered by your portion of the module and lead the class discussion in response to any questions or issues raised in the material. You accomplish this with your fellow module respondents. Each unexcused absence on a day when you should be leading a discussion (whether or not discussions are on that days schedule) results in a substantial decrease to your oral grade. Part of your oral discussion may be in response to a discussant question.

Module Compilations by the Instructor: You will be able to view the compilation of module outlines by fellow students in Blackboard before each class but after the delivery deadline under the Module Compilations link under Assignments.

B. Module Discussant Submissions (15 pts): Your discussant question and response will be submitted in BlackboardKeep a single running document of ALL of your Discussant Questions and Responses throughout the semester in Word since you will be required to submit this compilation as well at the end of the semester.

For each discussant assignment, pose a single question based on the one or more chapters or portions of a chapter assigned to you. Others should be able to answer your question in a few sentences if they have read the material. Then provide your response to the question you pose. Your response to your own discussion/exam question should be a minimum of 50 words but may be much longer. See the third example under the example written responses

Submission of Discussant Question and Answer to Blackboard: The written response must be delivered in plain text with no formatting except for line breaks between paragraphs.

• Within Blackboard, go to Assignments > Module Report and Discussant Submissions > Create Message
• Click the TO button > select ONLY Harlan Onsrud (instructor) > click the arrow to add him as the only recipient of the message
• The subject of your message MUST be in the form of your last name followed by the module designator, chapter and portion assigned to you (e.g. Smith – Module A Discussant, Chapter 3, Part 2).
• Paste the module discussant response into the text window (There must be NO formatting except for new lines and never attach a file under Module Report and Discussant Submissions).
• Click SUBMIT to send the assignment

III. Course Notes Journal

You will receive a note-taking paper template compiled from the submissions of your fellow students at the beginning of each class period. You should add further class discussion notes by hand to the templates. In addition, you are encouraged to take your own notes or reflections on each chapter as you go through the readings. Thus, your course notes journal for each class period should consist of (a) the note taking templates, (b) your hand written class notes added to the templates, and (c) any of your own notes that you took as you read the material covered by each book chapter (or equivalent). Organize your journal in chronological order as covered in the course and most students have done so in the past using a 3-ring binder.
In short, your journal by the end of the semester should contain the compilation of the written submissions from all your class peers as well as your personal notes. You may deliver the journal in digital or hand written form.

IV. Midterm Exam

The midterm exam will consist of a complex conflict situation involving societal conflict and cyberlaw policy or legal issues. You will be asked in a take home exam to prepare detailed and well reasoned arguments supporting one or both sides in resolving the issues.  The midterm exam is assigned on Tuesday October 3 with topics selected by each student on or before class on October 5. No more than two persons may select the same topic which must be claimed by sending a message to Midterm Topic Submissions under the Midterm Exam link in Blackboard.

The midterm exam is due on the date as set forth on the exam and should be delivered as a Word or pdf file using the Midterm Exam Files link in Blackboard. The message title in Blackboard should take the form or YourLastName – COS 490 Midterm Exam. The name of the attached file must also start with your last name. To satisfy the intensive writing general education requirement in this course, you may be required to rewrite your exam response before your submission is accepted in final form.

V. Social Issue and Professional Practice Outcomes Assessment Questions: Each student has been assigned specific questions for completion in blocks of four questions. You may want to start answering these questions earlier rather than later in the semester. List each question in entirety before providing your response. Post the responses to your assigned questions before your required due date at 8:00 pm as designated on the Outcomes Assessment Assignment. Your assignment should be submitted on BlackBoard under ACM-IEEE Outcomes Assessment Submissions. Submit at this location as an attachment (in a single Word or pdf document) copies of your assigned questions and their affiliated responses as assigned to you in the Outcomes Assessment Assignment. The message title must take the form of your last name followed by the questions assigned (example: Smith – OA Questions 5-9). The name of the attached file must also begin with YourLastName. Similar to module responses, your submissions will be distributed to the rest of the class  and you will lead discussions of your responses. In this case several of you will be responding to the same questions. All students are expected to expand upon and/or offer alternative perspectives to all responses submitted during the oral presentations.

VI. End of Semester Submissions

(a) Submit Your Digital Personal Module Reports Compilation: Your digital module reports compilation consists of all your personal module assignment responses prepared and submitted throughout the semester. Keep a running document throughout the semester of all of the module responses you personally prepared which must include both the outline and full response to each assigned module. Responses to all modules must be included in your Module Compilation at the end of the semester even if you miss responding on time for a specific class due to illness or otherwise. You may want to review and edit your module entries prior to final submission. The module compilation is due on December 7. Submit it as an attachment (in a single Word or pdf document) in Blackboard underEnd of Semester Files > Digital Personal Module Reports Compilation. The message title must take the form of YourLastName – COS 490 Personal Module Reports Compilation. The attached file name must begin with YourLastName.

(b) Submit Your Digital Personal Discussant Questions and Answers Compilation: Not Applicable in Fall 2018 This compilation consists of all your assigned discussant questions and responses as prepared and submitted throughout the semester. Keep a running document throughout the semester of all of the responses. All assigned discussant questions and responses must be included in the compilation at the end of the semester even if you miss responding on time for a specific class due to illness or otherwise. You may want to review and edit these entries prior to final submission. The module compilation is due on December 7. Submit it as an attachment (in a single Word or pdf document) in Blackboard under End of Semester Files > Discussant Questions & Answers Compilation. The message title must take the form of YourLastName – COS 490 Personal Discussant Submissions Compilation. The attached file name must begin with YourLastName.

(c) Submit Your Course Notes Journal: This submission is  is due on the day of the final exam. If kept electronically or scanned, submit it as an attachment (in a single Word or pdf document) in Blackboard under End of Semester Files > Course Notes Journal. The message title must take the form of YourLastName – COS 490 Course Notes Journal. The attached file name must begin with YourLastName. If in paper form, deliver to Professor Onsrud at the beginning of the final exam period. The Journal is not mandatory this semester but high aspiring students should expect to present a solid journal at the end of the semester.

(d) Submit Your Outcomes Assessment Question Compilation: After the discussion of your questions in class with your peers and after further research and expansion on your own, submit your rewritten question compilation on or before December 7. Submit it as an attachment (in a single Word or pdf document) in Blackboard under End of Semester Files > Personal Outcomes Assessment Compilation. The message title must take the form of YourLastName – COS 490 Personal Outcomes Assessment Compilation. The attached file name must begin with YourLastName.

Failure to submit any of the above with all assignments completed will result in a grade of Incomplete in the course. Thus if you were sick or otherwise failed to complete an assignment on time, it must still be completed and included in your compilations to receive a passing grade in the course.

VII. Final Exam: The final exam will be two hours in length in class on paper and will draw primarily on selected issues raised in the Module Exercises and in the Social Issues and Practice Outcomes Assessment document. It will likely include some questions submitted by students throughout the semester. It will also draw on additional issues addressed in class discussions, in the readings and in the legal issue pre-exam.

Grading
Social Issues and Professional Practice Outcomes Assessment Responses – 20%
Module Assignments (written submissions and oral presentations) – 25%
Discussant Questions and Responses (written and oral) – 10%
General Class Discussion Participation & Attendance – 5%
Mid-term Exam – 20%
Final Exam – 20%
Course Notes Journal – up to 10% bonus if comprehensive, 3% if complete but minimalist note taking

SOCIAL ISSUES AND PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT ASSIGNMENTS

  TOPIC QUESTIONS
OA I. SOCIAL CONTEXT 1-10
OA II. ANALYTICAL TOOLS 11-14
OA III. PROFESSIONAL ETHICS 15-27
OA IV. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY 28-39
OA V. PRIVACY AND CIVIL LIBERTIES 40-46
OA VI. PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION 47-53
OA VII. HISTORY 54-57
OA VIII. ECONOMIES OF COMPUTING 58-62
OA IX. SECURITY AND COMPUTER CRIMES 63-69

 

 

The following assignments relate to the questions found in the document posted at Outcomes Assessment Assignment. Please read the instructions in that document in detail before submitting responses in accordance with the following schedule. Assignments are due at 8:00 pm in Blackboard the evening before the discussion.

 

 

 

Outcomes Assessment Questions Assigned First Person Second Person Third Person Fourth  Person Class Discussion
1-4  Alcorn  Bailey  Craig Sept 6
5-8  Elliott  Fair  Goodale Sept 6
9-12  Green  Hall  Hawkins Sept 6
13-16  Judkins  Krevans  Monahan Sept 6
17-20  Segee  Alcorn  Bailey  Westhoven Sept 11
21-24  Craig  Elliott  Fair Sept 11
25-28  Goodale  Green  Hall Sept 11
29-32  Hawkins  Judkins  Krevans Sept 11
33-36  Monahan  Segee  Alcorn  Westhoven Sept 13
37-40  Bailey  Craig  Elliott Sept 13
41-44  Fair  Goodale  Green Sept 13
45-48  Hall  Hawkins  Judkins  Westhoven Sept 13
49-52  Krevans  Monahan  Segee Sept 13
53-56  Alcorn  Bailey  Craig Sept 18
57-60  Elliott  Fair  Goodale Sept 18
61-64  Green  Hall  Hawkins  Westhoven Sept 18
65-69  Judkins  Krevans  Monahan  Segee Sept 18
 –  –  –

MODULE ASSIGNMENTS

I. HISTORY OF CYBER SOCIETY

Name in Black = module reporter
Name in Blue = module discussant

Assigned Reading:
The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution (2014) 540 pages [Audio Available] Walter Isaacson

CHAPTER TOPIC STUDENT 1 (Part 1)
STUDENT 2 (Part 2)
STUDENT 3 (Part 3)
Class Discussion
Module A          
1 Ada, Countess of Lovelace  Alcorn Hawkins Monahan Sept 20
– not appl
2 The Computer Elliott Bailey Judkins Sept 20
3 Programming Green Fair Craig Sept 20
4 The Transistor Krevans Hall Goodale Sept 20
Module B
5 The Microchip Segee Westhoven Alcorn Sept 25
 
6 Video Games Elliott Craig Green Sept 25
7 The Internet Hawkins Bailey Judkins Sept 25
8 The Personal Computer Monahan Fair Goodale Sept 25
Module C
9 Software Hall Krevans Segee Sept 27
10 Online Judkins Bailey  Westhoven Sept 27
11 The Web Green  Fair  Craig Sept 27
12 Ada Forever Alcorn  Hawkins  Elliott Sept 27

II. CYBERLAW / INTERNET LAW

Assignment: Prior to reading any of the assigned legal material, all students must take the online Cyberlaw Pre-Test. You will receive an email notification to complete the survey after the pre-test has been transitioned to a controlled survey restricted to members of the class. Although responses are anonymous, your participation in completing the survey will be tracked. Complete this assignment by 8:00 pm on September 12.

Assigned Reading: Cyberlaw Compendium Download the pdf version of this document here (psswrd: duckSoup). Follow additional links from that document as needed.

Module Assignments: Outline the most important core concepts that all computer scientists should understand under each legal concept.

 Chapters TOPIC STUDENT 1 (Part 1)
STUDENT 2 (Part 2)
STUDENT 3 (Part 3)
Class Discussion
Module D            
 1-4 Copyright Goodale Krevans  Monahan Oct 2
 –  
 5-7 Copyright Hall Segee  Judkins Oct 2
 –
 8-11 Copyright Green  Alcorn  Westhoven Oct 2
 –
 12-15 Patent Craig  Elliott  Monahan Oct 2
 –
Module E
 16-19 Patent Krevans  Bailey  Hawkins Oct 4
 –  
 20-22 Patent Hall  Fair  Goodale Oct 4
 –
23-26 Trademark Segee  Green  Alcorn Oct 4
 –
27-30 Trademark Elliott  Hawkins  Monahan Oct 4
 –
Module F
31-34 Internet Law Westhoven  Fair  Bailey Oct 11
 –
35-37 Internet Law Judkins Krevans  Goodale Oct 11
 –
38-40 Trade Secret Craig Hall  Segee Oct 11
 –

Instructor: Professor reviews best responses to the Pretest explaining reasoning.

III. CRIME AND SECURITY

Assigned Reading:
Future Crimes: Everything Is Connected, Everyone Is Vulnerable and What We Can Do About It (2015) 400 pages [Audio Available] Marc Goodman

CHAPTER TOPIC STUDENT 1 (Part 1)
STUDENT 2 (Part 2)
STUDENT 3 (Part 3)
Class Discussion
Module G
         
1 Connected, Dependent , and Vulnerable Judkins Alcorn  Elliott Oct 16
 
2 System Crash Krevans  Hawkins  Bailey Oct 16
3 Moore’s Outlaws Westhoven  Fair  Hall Oct 16
4 You’re Not the Customer, You’re the Product Green  Craig  Monahan Oct 16
Module H
5 The Surveillance Economy Goodale Segee Bailey Oct 18
 
6 Big Data, Big Risk Judkins Fair Krevans Oct 18
7 I.T Phones Home Green Craig Hawkins Oct 18
8 In Screen We Trust Westhoven Alcorn Monahan Oct 18
Module I
9 Mo’ Screens, Mo’ Problems Elliot Goodale Hall Oct 23
10 Crime, Inc. Segee Alcorn Krevans Oct 23
11 Inside the Digital Underground Judkins Green  Bailey Oct 23
12 When Al Things Are Hackable Fair Elliot Monahan Oct 23
 
13 Home Hacked Home Westhoven Craig Goodale Oct 23
Module J
14 Hacking You Hall Hawkins Segee Oct 25
15 Rise of the Machines: When Cyber Crime Goes 3-D Judkins Alcorn Fair Oct 25
16 Next Generation Security Threats: Why Cyber Was Only the Beginning Krevans Hawkins  Green Oct 25
 
17 Surviving progress  Craig Monahan  Bailey Oct 25
18 The Way Forward  Westhoven  Hall  Elliott Oct 25

IV. PRIVACY

Assigned Reading:
Information Privacy Fundamentals for Librarians and Information Professionals  (2014) 110 pages, Cherie L. Givens

CHAPTER TOPIC STUDENT 1 (Part 1)
STUDENT 2 (Part 1)
STUDENT 3 (Part 1)
Class Discussion
Module K
         
1 (p.1-11) Intro to Info Privacy  Goodale  Segee  Alcorn Oct 30
 –
2 (p.17-27) Protecting Info Privacy Craig  Fair Green Oct 30
3 (p. 31-47) U.S. Privacy Protections Hawkins Monahan Westhoven Oct 30
4 (p. 53-66) Privacy Literacy Bailey Elliott Hall Oct 30
Module L
5 (p. 71-79) Info Privacy in Libraries Judkins Goodale Segee Nov 1
6 (p. 81-96) Privacy Policies and Programs Alcorn Craig Green Nov 1
7 (p. 99-110)  Global Info Privacy Fair Bailey Elliott Nov 1

V. CYBER SOCIETY PERSPECTIVES ON BUSINESS AND EDUCATION

Assigned Reading: The Future of Work: Robots, AI and Automation (2018) 166 pages
Darrell M. West

CHAPTER TOPIC STUDENT 1 (Part 1)
STUDENT 2 (Part 2)
STUDENT 3 (Part 3)
Student 4 (Prt 4) Class Discussion
Module M          
1 & 2 Robots & Artificial Intelligence Hall  Judkins  Monahan  Westhoven Nov 6
3 & 4 IOT & Rethinking Work Goodale Hawkins Segee  Bailey Nov 6
 
5 & 6 New Social Contract & Lifetime Learning  Craig Alcorn Elliot Green Nov 6
7 & 8 Politics Up To Task & Economic and Political Reform Fair Hall Hawkins Monahan Nov 6

Assigned Reading: Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy (2016) 231 pages, Cathy O’Neil

CHAPTER TOPIC STUDENT 1 (Part 1)
STUDENT 2 (Part 2)
STUDENT 3 (Part 3)
Student 4 (Prt 4) Class Discussion
Module N          
Intro + 1 Introduction & Bomb Parts Judkins Goodale Westhoven Segee Nov 8
2 & 3 Shell Shocked & Arms Race Alcorn Bailey Craig  Elliott Nov 8
 
4 & 5 Propaganda Machine & Civilian Casualties  Fair Goodale Grren Hall Nov 8
6 & 7 Ineligible to Serve & Sweating Bullets Hawkins Judkins Monahan Westhoven Nov 8
Module O Class Discussion
8 & 9 Collateral Damage & No Safe Zone Segee Alcorn Bailey Craig Nov 13
10 & Concl The Targeted Citizen &  Conclusion Elliott Fair Goodale Green Nov 13
Aftrwrd Afterward  Hall Hawkins Nov 13

Assigned Reading:
One World Schoolhouse: Education Reimagined (2013) 259 pages, Salman Khan
Note: Page numbering below is from a hard copy of the book.

Assignment: Prior to reading One World Schoolhouse, go to the Khan Academy website (http://www.kahnacademy.org), create an account as a student, and then under the subjects menu start a math lesson module. The process involves first assessing the students knowledge in the subject. View a video whether you need to or not for the topic you have chosen. Good device? Missions help ensure students have all concepts mastered within a topical area. Are mastery badges a worthwhile tool for motivating students? You might also want to create a teacher account to see how you are able to track the progress of all of your students. The programming lessons use a “talk-through” approach rather than a video approach.

CHAPTER TOPIC
Note: List the topic titles in your submission
STUDENT 1 (Part 1)
STUDENT 2 (Part 2)
STUDENT 3 (Part 3)
Class Discussion
Module P          
pp. 1-36 Teaching Nadia, No-Frills Videos, Focusing on Content  Judkins   Monahan  Segee Nov 15
     
pp. 37-60 Mastery Learning, How Education Happens, Filling in the Gaps  Westhoven  Alcorn  Bailey Nov 15
      
pp. 61-96 Questioning Customs, The Prussian Model, Swiss Cheese Learning, Tests and Testing  Craig  Elliott  Fair Nov 15
     
pp. 97-126 Tracking Creativity, Homework, Flipping the Classroom, The Economics of Schooling  Goodale  Green  Hall Nov 15
     
Module Q
pp. 127-160 Theory vs Practice, Khan Academy Software, Leap to a Real Classroom, Fun and Games, Taking the Plunge  Hawkins  Judkins   Monahan Nov 20
     
pp. 161-190 The Los Altos Experiment, Education for All Ages, Embracing Uncertainty, My Background as a Student  Segee  Westhoven  Alcorn Nov 20
     
pp. 191-220 Spirit of the One Room School house, Teaching as a Team Sport, Ordered Chaos is a Good Thing, Redefining Summer, The Future of Transcripts  Bailey  Craig  Elliott Nov 20
     
pp. 221-254 Serving the Underserved, The Future of Credentials, What College Could Be Like, Conclusion: Making Time for Creativity  Fair  Goodale  Green Nov 20
     

VI. SOCIETY: PSYCHOLOGY, ETHICS, AND U.S. POLITICAL SYSTEM

Assigned Reading:
Yes! 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Persuasive (2009) 258 pages, Noah J. Goldstein, Steve J. Martin and Robert Cialdini

CHAPTER TOPIC
Note: List the chapter titles in your submission with a few points per chapter
STUDENT 1 (Part 1)
STUDENT 2 (Part 2)
STUDENT 3 (Part 3)
Class Discussion
Module R          
Chap 1-12  Green   Hall   Hawkins Nov 27
      
Chap 13-24  Judkins   Monahan   Segee Nov 27
     
Chap 25-36  Westhoven    Alcorn   Bailey Nov 27
     
Chap 37-50  Craig   Eliott   Fair Nov 27
     

Assigned Reading:
Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Are (2017) 284 pages, Darrell M. West

CHAPTER TOPIC STUDENT 1 (Part 1)
STUDENT 2 (Part 2)
STUDENT 3 (Part 3)
Student 4 (Prt 4) Class Discussion
Module S          
Introduction & Ch 1 (p. 1-41) Intro & Your Faulty Gut Goodale  Green  Hall  Hawkins Nov 29
Ch 4 (only p. 128-163) Hate & Prejudice, etc. Judkins Monahan Segee  Westhoven Nov 29
 
Ch 5 (p. 165-206) Zooming In Alcorn Bailey Craig Elliott Nov 29
Ch 6 (p. 207-240) World As Lab Fair Goodale Green Hall Nov 29
Ch 7&8 (p. 207-240) What data can’t do & What we shouldn’t do Hawkins Judkins Monahan Segee Nov 29

Assigned Reading: The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age (2018) 308 pages
David E. Sanger

CHAPTER TOPIC STUDENT 1 (Part 1) STUDENT 2 (Part 2) STUDENT 3 (Part 3) Class Discussion
Module T
Preface & Prologue Preface & From Russia, With Love  Westhoven  Alcorn  Bailey Dec 4
1 Original Sins  Craig  Elliott  Fair Dec 4
2 Pandora’s Inbox  Goodale  Green  Hall Dec 4
3 Hundred-Dollar Takedown  Hawkins  Judkins  Monahan Dec 4
   
4 Man in the Middle  Segee  Westhoven  Alcorn Dec 4
      
Module U
5 The China Rules  Bailey  Craig  Elliott Dec 6
    –    
6 The Kims Strike Back  Fair  Goodale  Green Dec 6
       
7 Putin’s Petri Dish  Hall  Hawkins  Judkins Dec 6
8 The Fumble  Monahan  Segee   Westhoven Dec 6
 
9 Warning from the Cotswolds   Alcorn  Bailey  Craig Dec 6
Module V
10 The Slow Awakening  Elliott  Fair  Goodale Dec 11
    –    
11 Three Crises in the Valley  Green  Hall  Hawkins Dec 11
       
12 Left of Launch  Judkins  Monahan  Segee Dec 11
Afterward  Westhoven  Alcorn   Bailey Dec 11
 

VII. PROJECT TEAMWORK

Assigned Reading: None this semester

VIII. COLLABORATION
Assigned Reading: None this semester

IX. DESIGN
Assigned Reading: None this semester  

December 13, 2018 – Exam Review Session

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