4-H News in Washington County ~ December 2013

December 6th, 2013 3:25 PM

Volume 8, Issue 12

 

Dates to Remember

December 25- Office Closed

December 31- State 4-H Reenrollment Form Deadline

January 1- Office Closed

January 11- Public Speaking Clinic 1-3 p.m., Cobscook Community Learning Center

January 25- 10:00 am – 1:00 pm – UMaine 4-H Science Saturday – University of Maine

February 19- Public Speaking club delegates due to the Extension Office, no exceptions

March 8- Washington County Public Speaking Tournament

March 29- Regional Public Speaking Tournament, University of Maine

 

Tractor Supply Company Grand Opening

On October 26th, 2013, the Dennys River Manure Movers, the Quoddy Kids, Hope Carle and family, and 4-H Community Education Assistant, Nicole Willey, joined the new Tractor Supply Company in celebrating its Grand Opening. TSC stores nationwide greatly support 4-H in their communities, and this new Calais store is no exception. In addition to welcoming our clubs to attend and fund-raise, the county program was awarded with a $250 check. THANK-YOU TRACTOR SUPPLY COMPANY!

Be watching future editions of this newsletter and your email for opportunities to collaborate with this new store. We will be inviting you to visit and share your displays with patrons again in the near future, possibly during their national 4-H Clover promotion. To learn more, visit the website:

 

Scenes from TSC Grand Opening

Scenes from TSC Grand Opening

 

Scenes from TSC Grand Opening

Scenes from TSC Grand Opening

 

4-H Demonstrations and Illustrated Talks – What are they anyway?

4-H Public Speaking Clinic – Saturday, January 11th, 1pm to 3pm

Cobscook Community Learning Center, Trescott

For ANYONE! — 4-H Youth, Volunteers & Supporters
Come to learn new skills or to brush up on old ones!

Presented by Lisa Reilich, 4-H Youth Development Professional for Hancock & Washington Counties

With the ringing of the New Year, it will soon be time to get up in front of your family, friends, club, class and/or community and give your 4-H demonstration or illustrated talk! For some of us, that can sound a little scary – even for me, and I have been getting up in front of people and talking or presenting for quite a long time.

Did you know that the average person spends up to 50% of their waking time either speaking or listening? 70% of American adults say they fear public speaking. These adults also report fearing public speaking (41%) more than death (18%). 4-H alumni who participated in 4-H Public Speaking when they were younger, come back to tell us that this was their most important 4-H life skill. Don’t worry; YOU can learn public speaking skills very easily. Just like any other skill, the more you work at it, the better you will become – and it’s never too early to get started!

I will be holding a fun and interactive 4-H Public Speaking Clinic at the Cobscook Community Learning Center in Trescott on Saturday, January 11th, from 1pm to 3pm. We will go over what makes a 4-H Public Speaking presentation, how demonstrations and illustrated talks differ from one another – with some live and video examples, try our hand at creating a presentation together, and have you leave with valuable suggestions for helping you, your 4-H youth, or your school group decide on a topic, prepare a presentation and have the courage to get up there and do it!

Please register by Wednesday, January 8th, by calling Tara at the office, 255-3345, or e-mailing her at tara.a.wood@maine.edu. I hope to see many of you there!

WHAT ARE DEMONSTRATIONS AND ILLUSTRATED TALKS?

Demonstrations are simply showing and telling how to do something. You explain what you are doing while you work on something you like to do. You’ve seen lots of demonstrations without realizing it. When your mom or dad shows you how to pound a nail, make your bed, or set a table, that’s a demonstration. When your 4-H leader shows you how to transplant a houseplant, that’s a demonstration, too. Many television shows also feature demonstrations.

Illustrated Talks are like demonstrations but instead of working on something while you talk, you just talk and use a variety of visual aids to help you. When your 4-H leader explains the horse breeds and colors by using horse models, that’s an illustrated talk. When your friend explains a family vacation trip and shows you pictures, maps, and souvenirs, that’s an illustrated talk, too.

All of our 4-H youth are invited to prepare a demonstration or illustrated talk for their club or class, and for this year’s Washington County 4-H Public Speaking Tournament, which will be held on Saturday, March 8th. Youth 9 to 18 years of age who participate in the County Tournament and may be eligible to participate in the 4-H Regional Public Speaking Tournament, which will be to held on Saturday, March 29th, at the University of Maine at Orono.

adapted from Knox-Lincoln County & UNH Cooperative Extension materials

 

DRMM Volunteering for the Historical Society

On November 8th, the Dennys River Manure Movers 4-H Club assisted the Dennys River Historical Society with the mailing of their Special Edition newsletter. As community service is an important component of youth development, these 4-Her’s are certainly fortunate to have such a great opportunity. Thank-you for your great work, Dennys River Manure Movers!

Pictured: DRMM 4-H members, Colin Windhorst and Ron Windhorst

Pictured: DRMM 4-H members, Colin Windhorst and Ron Windhorst

 

Project Records 2012-2013

Six Washington County 4-Hers submitted project records this year. Congratulations to all who participated:

Callie Chase

Makayla Chase

Roy Duffy

Siobhan Duffy

Alex Harris

Mikaila Loughlin

Helpful Hints for success with Project Records…

1. Start your 2013-2014 project records now! To print a copy use the online version.

2. Write your full name wherever asked.

3. Enter the day, month & year when filling in the date.

4. Leave nothing blank. If you don’t know how to fill something in, ask for help.

5. Give your work value! Income can be the item(s) you create, regardless of if you sell them. Income can also be the premiums you earned from the Perry Harvest Fair.

See the judging rubric (attached to your 2012-2013 project records, or available from your club leader or the county office) for scoring components and examples.

 

Lisa’s Corner

This fall, Jen Lobley, Extension Educator for Volunteer Development, led an enthusiastic group of daycare and school enrichment providers from both Hancock & Washington Counties through the interactive, hands-on 4-H Afterschool Academy at the Step by Step Childcare Care Center in Milbridge. Having taken this course two years ago myself, I was lucky enough to able to join Jen and her group for some of my favorite activities, with some of the fabulous results captured on film for you here.

The training takes 10 hours and is a combination of in-person and online training. Participants have the opportunity to earn CEUs or contact hours, get a spiffy 4-H Afterschool Academy t-shirt, and – through working with University research-based information and curriculum – gain valuable understanding of youth development along with new skills and strategies to add to their toolbox and bring back to their work with youth.

For more information on the 4-H Afterschool Academy, please visit the website.

Jen is looking for more opportunities to do the Afterschool Academy and can come right to you as long as there is a minimum of 10 participants. This training is so valuable for our work with youth, and not just for those volunteers in the schools and child-care centers. This is also a great opportunity for professional development for ed-tech & special ed teachers, or maybe for your whole staff if you operate a child-care or afterschool program. Please help get the word out. Let Tara or me know if you or someone you know would be interested in a future Afterschool Academy here in Washington County or elsewhere in the state, and take your 4-H volunteer training to the next level!

 

4-H Afterschool Academy Training

4-H Afterschool Academy Training

Individual groups of students worked together to explore an engineering challenge of building the tallest tower with just newspaper and masking tape as materials, and then take on technology to create innovative sun shades.

Individual groups of students worked together to explore an engineering challenge of building the tallest tower with just newspaper and masking tape as materials, and then take on technology to create innovative sun shades.

 

Lisa’s Challenge Activity of the Month

With extra time for holiday crafts, why not try this fun basket-weaving project that, when finished, you can keep or give away. This project takes about 45 minutes not including drying time, so set aside an hour, gather some friends, and have fun! Why not do this as a whole class or club and then fill your finished baskets with holiday goodies to give to a nearby homeless shelter, pet shelter or nursing home? It is a great time of year to share what you make with others, and even more special when you can do something special for others as a group.

Bread Basket Weaving

Every culture in the world has made baskets. The oldest known baskets were found in Egypt and thought to be 10,000 to 12,000 years old. Baskets have been made from every available material in many different ways, but always by hand until recently.

Pioneer children often made baskets to pass the time using tall grasses from the prairie, making basket weaving a craft with a useful purpose. With careful use, these baskets lasted a long time. Using salt dough, you can make a basket that carefully used will last a long time, too.

Materials Needed for Two Baskets

2 cups flour / 1 cup salt / 1 cup water / 1 Zipper-type plastic bags for storage (up to 5 days) / Measuring cups / Mixing bowls / Bread pans or other ovenproof pans or bowls to frame the basket / Cooking oil /

Rolling pins / 
Ruler / 
Knife / Varnish & Brushes (optional)

The Activity – You can work in pairs to mix and divide the dough….

Step 1: Prepare the salt dough- Mix the 2 cups flour and 1 cup salt in a bowl. Slowly add 1 cup water, mixing it thoroughly. Knead the dough with fingers for 5 to 7 minutes. Store dough in the zipper-style plastic bag for up to 5 days – or use right away for weaving.

Step 2: Prepare to weave- Turn your chosen mold upside down. This could be a bread pan, pie dish, bowl, or something else that is ovenproof and a similar size. Rub cooking oil on the outside of the mold. Using a rolling pin, roll the salt dough to about 1⁄4 inch thick. Sprinkle a little flour on work surface if it is sliding. Cut the rolled dough into 3⁄4 inch strips using a ruler and knife.

Step 3: Weave- Lay five or six strips across the mold horizontally.

Weave diagram

• Next lay two or three strips lengthwise, weaving them over and under the cross pieces.

• Weave two strips around the sides of the pan. Hold the strips in place by wetting the dough with a very small amount of water where the two strips meet.

• Press the dough together firmly, but gently. If a strip is not long enough to go all the way around, splice two strips together. Join the new strip right next to the old, preferably under a cross strip for added stability.

Step 4: Finish the basket- Cut the excess off all the strips at the lip of the mold. Roll some dough into a long rope and wind it around the pan right at the lip. Moisten the ends of the strips to help them stick to the dough rope.

Step 5: Dry the basket- Let the basket dry at room temperature (this takes three days) or bake it at 325 degrees for one hour. Let it cool completely before carefully lifting the dough basket off the mold.

Step 6: Preserve the basket- Seal with a coat of varnish to strengthen and protect from moisture. Brush on acrylic varnish or spray with artist’s fixate.

Talk it Over the 4-H Way!

Share… What challenges did you experience working with this material? Process… Why is weaving an important process?

Generalize… What do you use or wear or see in your everyday life that uses weaving techniques? What uses for baskets do you recognize now?

Apply… What other fiber techniques would you like to learn? How can simple weaving techniques be applied to other situations?

More 4-H Challenges…

• Learn to weave other basket types using pine needles, raffia or other materials.

• Research Native American basket weaving patterns, shapes, and uses.

• Make up your own 4-H basket-making challenge and share what you discover with us all 
here. 
Send us a picture of how your basket turned out or your own “4-H Basket-Making Challenge”, and we will include it in our newsletter next time. Be sure to let us know a bit about how the project went and for what you ended up using your basket – we can’t wait to hear all about it and your discoveries! 
You can find this activity and more in the 4-H Afterschool Agriculture: Acres of Adventures curriculum. This activity – with more interesting facts about basket making – can be found in Book 2 of that series (Frontier Living, pages 66 -67) and is available to borrow from our lending library.

 

School News

Ella Lewis School – Kindergarten ended the study of pumpkins by making pumpkin pie in a bag with Ms. Lisa. We learned that Math, Science and Social
Studies are everywhere. Our time together started with
Ms. Lisa explaining to us how the pilgrims made
pumpkin pie when there were no pie pans. They used
the pumpkin shell for a pie pan to bake their pumpkin
pie over fire. So, this 4-H activity was a great way to
transition from our unit of study on pumpkins to our unit of study on Thanksgiving.

-Submitted by Wanda Stanley, 4-H volunteer and Kindergarten teacher

Ella Lewis Programming Ella Lewis Programming Ella Lewis Programming

 

Jonesboro Elementary School – The 6th, 7th and 8th graders of Jonesboro Elementary School have taken the “Maps & Apps” 4-H National Youth Science Day Experiment challenge! Three teams are well underway designing their dream park using GIS strategies. What amazing parks they have dreamed up, too! They will present their final designs to the full group this month. Stay tuned for pictures of their process and final designs in next January’s newsletter.

 

VOLT Training

When you see VOLT (Volunteer On-going Leader Training), does it scare you off from getting involved with 4-H. Not to worry! This truly is a fun, hands on kind of experience, and what a chance to meet others. You learn more of what 4-H is all about. You learn about the many opportunities 4-H has to offer, the resources available, and the connection between 4-H and the University of Maine Cooperative Extension. As a VOLTed volunteer, you are covered by the University’s liability policy and you are qualified to serve as a chaperone. Most important of all is too feel comfortable with the amount of time that you might want to put into 4-H or maybe you just wanted to be better informed and will chose to not doing anything and that is alright. So come to a training and see where it leads you if any where.

 

 4-H News from the State

1. Celebrating 100 Years of 4-H in Maine- 2013 marks the 100th birthday of 4-H in Maine, and we want YOU to celebrate with us! Check with your local county office to find activities in your neck of the woods. Please check out our special Celebrating 100 Years website – we are also encouraging all of you to consider giving financially to the 4-H Foundation as we work to raise $100,000 in 2013 to support the 4-H program.

Happy 100 years Maine 4-H, and here’s to many more!

 

2. Beef Heifer Project- The New England Galloway Group is announcing their annual Heifer Project, which places a Belted Galloway heifer calf with a deserving youth recipient to allow for a hands-on education in beef cattle rearing and showmanship and to develop a love of the breed. The youth selected to receive a heifer is expected to return the first heifer calf back to the program so it will continue each year. If you are interested in applying for this program, you can download the application; the application deadline is December 31, 2013.

 

3. Beef Conference- University of Maine Cooperative Extension is co-sponsoring the 24th Annual Maine Beef Conference on Saturday, December 7, 2013 in Bangor. The topics will be on Keeping Your Herd Healthy. For more information and to register go to the Cooperative Extension Livestock page.

 

4. Save the Date for 2014 Maine 4-H Days- Maine 4-H Days will take place June 20 – 22, 2014 at the Windsor Fairgrounds. If you are interested in helping to plan next year’s event, please contact Jessy Brainerd at jessica.brainerd@maine.edu or 581.3877.

 

5. Market Steers for Fryeburg Fair- 4-Hers raising a steer for the 2014 market steer show at Fryeburg Fair need to send in an Intent to Participate Form  by January 3, 2014. We appreciate you completing your paperwork early. Please enroll or re-enroll as a 4-H member early, and send your Intent to Participate form to your county office. The earlier we receive your paperwork, the earlier we can begin tagging animals, and avoiding tagging during the winter months.

 

6. Change in Market Animal Shows at Windsor Fair- Windsor Fair has changed their baby beef and market lamb show and sale from 4-H to a youth show and sale. The 2014 Show and Sale will be open to all youth between the ages of 9 and 18 as of December 31st of the current year. In lieu of an Intent to sell form, youth must CALL the committee to let them know they want to raise a steer or lamb for the show and auction; committee members are: Diane Gushee – 256.7798 or dianergushee@gmail.com, Dana Prime – 446.3570, Carol Davis – 491.7893 or carol.davis@careandcomfort.com, Curtis Prime – Livestock Superintendent, Windsor Fair – 242.3341, and Tom Foster, President, Windsor Fair. To participate in the 2014 Youth Show and Sale, notification must be communicated to a committee member by January 3, 2014 for market steers ad June 6, 2014 for market lambs. View a complete list of rules at the website.

 

7. 4-H Regional Public Speaking Tournament-

For: Hancock, Kennebec, Knox, Lincoln, Somerset, Penobscot, Piscataquis, Waldo and Washington Counties

The 4-H Regional Public Speaking Tournament will be held Saturday, March 29, 2014 at the University of Maine at Orono. 4-H Youth ages 9 to 18 who have participated in their county 4-H public speaking tournament and received the required score are invited to participate. For youth in counties which do not hold public speaking tournaments, arrangements may be made through their county’s Extension office to present their presentation to their county’s 4-H staff in order to be eligible. Registration for the regional tournament must be handled through the youth’s county Extension office. To register youth, county offices should contact Joyce Fortier in the Hancock County Extension Office no later than March 19th at 207.667.8212 or at joyce.fortier@maine.edu. For more information on 4-H public speaking, including guidelines and judging sheets, please visit the website or contact Lisa Reilich at 207.598.6621 or lisa.reilich@maine.edu.

 

8. One Maine Potato, Two Maine Potato, more….-

The science behind cooking and eating spuds.

Come explore the science related to the storage conditions, processing and healthy consumption of Maine potatoes. This class will include baking potatoes, and preparing a “potato bar” with healthy toppings for lunch! We will discuss MyPlate recommendations, and where potatoes and toppings fit as part of a healthy diet. Participants will also have an introduction to kitchen basics and kitchen safety (knife skills, hand washing, equipment overview, etc).

This 4-H Science Saturday will take place on January 25, 2014 from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm, at Hitchner Hall, at the University of Maine in Orono (with a snow date of February 8, 2014); there is room for a maximum of 25 participants in grades 6 – 8. Jason Bolton, Assistant Extension Professor and Food Safety Specialist, and Kate Yerxa, MS, RD, Extension Educator will host this event.

Register online or for more information contact Jessy Brainerd at 800.287.0274 (toll free in Maine) or 207.581.3877 or e-mail jessica.brainerd@maine.edu.

 

9. 4-H Geocaches!- If you participated in the hiding 100 geocaches to celebrate 100 years of 4-H, cold weather is upon us. We hope everyone enjoyed participating in this celebration of 4-H. If you didn’t register with a public site for your geocache, a friendly reminder that you may want to remove any hidden geocaches for the upcoming season. Be sure to let your county office know how many 4-Hers visited your geocache.

 

Cooking with the Kids

Holiday Granola with Cranberries and Pistachios

Ingredients:
• 3 cups rolled oats
• 1/2 cup shelled pistachios
• 1 Teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg • 1/2 teaspoon salt
• 1/4 cup brown sugar
• 1/4 cup maple syrup
• 2 Tablespoons vegetable oil
• 1/2 cup dried cranberries

Preheat oven to 275 degrees.
In a large bowl toss oats with pistachios, nutmeg, salt and brown sugar. Stir in maple and oil to combine. Spread on a large rimmed baking sheet. Bake for 1 hour, stirring half-way through. Cool completely on baking sheet. Stir in cranberries.

 

Highbush Blueberry, Asparagus & Strawberry Plant Sale to Benefit UMaine Master Gardener Volunteers

November 26th, 2013 4:05 PM
“Grow it Right!” Plant Sale
The University of Maine Cooperative Extension and its Master Gardener Volunteers are offering a “Grow it Right” plant sale to raise funds for its Master Gardener Volunteers program.
Blueberry Plant Pack: consisting of three young plants, two varieties per pack (Blueray, Patriot, Northland or Jersey*) $35.95 per pack.
Asparagus Crowns: 10 crowns (Jersey Supreme**) $15.00 per pack.
Strawberry plants: pack of 25 young dormant plants $15.00 per pack.
Plants will be available for pickup at the locations listed below on Saturday, May 17, 2014:
  • Cumberland County at the Barron Center in Portland
  • Hancock County in Ellsworth
  • Knox-Lincoln counties in Waldoboro
  • Highmoor Farm in Monmouth
  • Penobscot County in Bangor
  • Piscataquis County in Dover-Foxcroft
  • Oxford County in South Paris
  • Washington County in Machias
  • York County in Springvale

Helpful Hints on Handling Turkeys for Thanksgiving

November 26th, 2013 11:56 AM

Got a turkey question? Bulletin #4213 Helpful Hints for Handling Turkeys for Thanksgiving has your answers. From shopping for the turkey (fresh or frozen?), thawing the turkey, stuffing the bird (is it safe?), to roasting the turkey.

View the publication-Helpful Hings for Handling Turkeys for Thanksgiving

Watch Beth Calder and Jason Bolton in our Experts on Demand Holiday Food Safety video.

You may also call the University of Maine Cooperative Extension office in Washington County and speak with Extension Educator Alan Majka with your specific food safety questions- 1.800.287.1542 (toll free within Maine) or local 207.255.3345.

Visit the publications store where you can find more publications on food safety.

Panel to Discuss Washington County Food System

November 22nd, 2013 12:47 PM

A free panel discussion about the Washington County food system will be held Wednesday, December 11, 6-7:30 p.m., at Kimball Hall at the University of Maine at Machias.

Much of the food we consume is imported into the area from other counties, states and countries. This has impacts on local land use, the environment, employment and economics.

Panelists include Kevin Athearn, associate professor of environmental and community economics at the University of Maine at Machias; Carly DelSignore, co-owner and operator of Tide Mill Farm in Edmunds; Inez Lombardo, founder and coordinator of Machias Marketplace online farmers market; and David Thompson, store manager of the Machias Hannaford.

Following each panelist’s presentation, audience members will have an opportunity to ask questions. The event, which is open to the public, will be streamed live over the Internet and archived online (machias.edu/umm-live).

This is the third panel in the Food and Community Series sponsored by Psychology and Community Studies at UMM, UMaine Extension and the Libra Foundation. For more information, contact UMaine Extension Educator Alan Majka, 207.255.3345 or University of Maine at Machias professor Meghan Duff, 207.255.1227. To request a disability accommodation, call Jo Ellen Scribner at the University of Maine at Machias, 207.255.1228.

About University of Maine at Machias:  The University of Maine at Machias is New England’s only public environmental liberal arts college, offering an undergraduate education uniquely grounded in the natural, social, cultural and economic environments of coastal Maine. As the smallest member of the University of Maine System, UMM enrolls an average of 1,000 students with a student-faculty ratio of 13:1, and offers degree programs in 12 fields of study.

About University of Maine Cooperative Extension:  As a trusted resource for almost 100 years, University of Maine Cooperative Extension has supported UMaine’s land and sea grant public education role by conducting community-driven, research-based programs in every Maine county. UMaine Extension helps support, sustain and grow the food-based economy. It is the only entity in our state that touches every aspect of the Maine Food System, where policy, research, production, processing, commerce, nutrition, and food security and safety are integral and interrelated. UMaine Extension also conducts the most successful out-of-school youth educational program in Maine through 4-H.

The University of Maine does not discriminate on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, including transgender status and gender expression, national origin, citizenship status, age, disability, genetic information or veteran’s status in employment, education, and all other programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding non-discrimination policies: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity, 101 North Stevens Hall, 207.581.1226.

 

Keep, Take or Toss Workshop to be Offered in Calais

November 13th, 2013 10:40 AM

This session will focus on ways of making your life more organized in the areas of your home or office; knowing what to do with important papers and cleaning tips in general. So get ready to save money, have a yard sale or just simplify your life.

Keep, Take or Toss is designed to help us decide what to keep, give away/donate, or toss out. It will also include information on organizing important papers as well as some recycling tips that will save you time and money. Learn to simplifying your life by organizing and reducing your clutter.

So come with your questions and decide whether to Keep, Take or Toss it.

The session will be held at the Calais Free Library in Calais on Tuesday, November 19th, from 10:00-11:30 a.m.  There is no cost for the session.  Pre-registration is required by contacting Kathleen Staples at 454.2758 or kstaples@calais.lib.me.us.

The University of Maine does not discriminate on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, including transgender status and gender expression, national origin, citizenship status, age, disability, genetic information or veteran’s status in employment, education, and all other programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding non-discrimination policies: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity, 101 North Stevens Hall, 207.581.1226.

To request a disability accommodation, call Tara Wood at 207.255.3345 or toll free at 1.800.287.1542 to discuss your needs.

4-H News in Washington County ~ November 2013

November 6th, 2013 12:40 PM

Volume 8, Issue 11

Dates to Remember

November 11- Veteran’s Day – Extension Office Closed

November 27- Reenrollment Forms Due

November 28 – Thanksgiving Day – Extension Office Closed

November 29 – Extension Office Closed

January 11- Public Speaking Clinic 1-3 p.m.

February 19- Public Speaking club delegates due to the Extension Office, no exceptions

Perry Harvest Fair Club Exhibits

The Dennys River Manure Movers entered a brilliant exhibit of “Celebrating 4-H – 100 Years of 4-H in Maine.” They tied in the history of the horse, displaying details of horse evolution with historic 4-H horse curricula and an heirloom 4-H ribbon. This won the club not only the first place ribbon for club exhibits, but also the Best in Show ribbon awarded at this year’s fair. The Horse Power 4-H club entered a festive exhibit of 4-H Birthday cheer that certainly set a happy tone at the Perry Harvest Fair 4-H hall.

Dennys River Manure Movers Club Exhibit for the Perry Harvest Fair

Dennys River Manure Movers Club Exhibit for the Perry Harvest Fair

Horse Power Club Exhibit for Perry Harvest Fair

Horse Power Club Exhibit for Perry Harvest Fair

Perry Harvest Fair Member Exhibits

Kudos to Schylar Dempsey, Katie Bitar and Libby Bitar for winning Best in Project ribbons! Schylar completed a three-page report on his several tested models of a wind turbine, exhibiting in 3-D what he found to be the most energy-producing design. The Bitars showed great imagination in the fairy house they designed from items found in nature. Some of the other spectacular exhibits included: homemade dog treats, a horseshoe picture frame, flower arranging, and a decorative glass decoration.

Schylar Dempsey’s Exhibit

Schylar Dempsey’s Exhibit

Katie and Libby Bitar’s Exhibit

Katie and Libby Bitar’s Exhibit

Perry Harvest Fair Cloverbud Exhibits

Our Cloverbuds (4-Her’s with 4-H ages 5-8) proved that they, too, know how to impress! From a detailed display about forestry to a handmade survival bracelet to a fun-loving horse toy, our Cloverbuds are certainly a talented group. Cloverbuds receive a green ribbon for participation and a $1 coin honorarium. We know these youth have many blue ribbons in their future!

Noodle Horse Project by Callie Chase

Noodle Horse Project by Callie Chase

Forestry Project by Alex Harris

Forestry Project by Alex Harris

Perry Harvest Fair Animal Demonstrations

John Johnson, a member of the Dennys River Manure Movers, set up a detailed showing of his chickens, facts about his birds, and even their eggs! For an hour he showed his chickens, answered questions from the public and made 4-H in Washington County proud! Way to go, John!

If you are reading this newsletter and are in an animal project or are just starting one, you might just be able to demonstrate your work with your animal at the next Perry Harvest Fair in 2014. Keep up the great work!

A 4-H member displays his animals during the fair.

A 4-H member displays his animals during the fair.

Reenrollment for 2014

All reenrollment packets have been sent out. Please contact the office if you do not have yours already. All forms are due to the office on Wednesday, November 27th.

Geocaching

There is still a month left to find the 4-H geocaches hidden here in Washington County! The Quoddy Kids and the 4-H Machines worked hard to place their geocaches this spring. Have you found them yet? Below is a picture from one 4-Her who has! Just let me know if you need me to email you the coordinates! Have fun!

Geocache

Geocache

Perry Harvest Fair Contributors

A HUGE thank-you to Ellen Brown and the Perry Recreation Committee. Every year they invite Washington County 4-H to their fair, provide display space and tables at no cost to the 4-H program, and even supply the funds for the premiums, honorariums and ribbons the youth are awarded. Another great thank-you to Caroline Maher, a dedicated 4-H volunteer and exhibit judge! Thank-you also to youth volunteer, Madelyn Willey, for spending her day assisting youth through the 4-H Sounds of Science experiment held at the fair this year. Thanks to all of the dedicated club volunteers and parents who came together to support the youth of our community. Your endless hours of commitment are very apparent in the quality of exhibits at the Perry Harvest Fair.

A 4-H youth volunteer shows her love and excitement of science.

A 4-H youth volunteer shows her love and excitement of science.

Horse Power 4-H club holds 100 Year Birthday Party and Awards Meeting

On Saturday, October 19, 2013, the Horse Power 4-H club had cake, ice cream and even presents to celebrate 100 Years of 4-H in Maine! One present was shared by the club in a fun, turn-taking activity. The remaining presents were those that the club members provided, donating gifts of pet food to the local animal shelter. Enrollment and re-enrollment forms were distributed and collected, and annual awards were given. Way to enjoy our Birthday, Horse Power 4-H!

Members and volunteers celebrate 100 years of 4-H!

Members and volunteers celebrate 100 years of 4-H!

A blue ribbon brings a bright smile to hard-working 4-H youth.

A blue ribbon brings a bright smile to hard-working 4-H youth.

Cooking With the Kids

Homemade Ice Cream in a Baggie adapted from “Always Look Up”

1 tbsp. sugar
1/2 cup milk
1/8 tsp. vanilla
6 tbsp. rock salt
2 sandwich sized Ziploc baggie
1 gallon sized Ziploc baggie
Ice cubes

Fill the gallon sized bag 1/2 full of ice and add the rock salt. Put milk, vanilla and sugar into 1 small bag. Seal. Put that bag into the other sandwich bag. Seal. I do this so it won’t rip open with the ice. Shake vigorously until the mixture is ice cream, which takes about 5 to 10 minutes, depending how much it is shaken. Wipe off the top of the ice cream bag, then open it carefully. Pour into a bowl, add your favorite toppings, and enjoy!

School News

Ella Lewis School - Lots of exciting 4-H happenings are up at Ella Lewis this fall. To start with, the 1st graders finished up their seed exploration and germination unit with the Maine Ag in the Classroom “Seed, Soil & Sun” program. In what is becoming an annual tradition to enrich their science lessons, 4-H volunteer Farmer Carl and Lisa led the class in exploring the parts of plants, the food we eat, and the importance of taking care of the earth to make sure we can be healthy, too.

Meanwhile, the upper grades are busy planning their
new school garden, led by 4-H volunteer and Science teacher Danielle Wells and a very active group of volunteers from the community. Having received a Farm to School Grant last summer for $2000 to construct a hoop house for indoor classroom space for their garden-based science projects, construction on this has started and should be ready for planting by the end of November.

Finally, thanks to Art Teacher and 4-H volunteer Emily Hutchinson, the students will be incorporating 4-H into their classroom this year by completing their 4-H project record cards as they finish a project with the hopes of entering these in the Blue Hill Fair 4-H Exhibit Hall. Emily is excited about the opportunity to have the students use these cards to further reflect on the skills they learn and the life skills they used while working on their pieces.

Morning Song School Cooperative – Morning Song 7th graders are now taking Art with soon-to-be 4-H volunteer Jana Prosser. They will be preparing their 4-H project cards as they go, just like Ella Lewis students. Look for their works of art at this years Blue Hill Fair!

In Theatre, the Morning Song Players, led by 4-H volunteer Lisa Reilich, are working on honing their acting skills through intensive scene work, monologues, and extra work in improvisation. They will perform their pieces at the end of December.

Trenton Elementary School – Trenton Elementary School is in their 4th year as a 4-H school group, being our first 4-H school group in Hancock
County. Their afterschool program, led by 4-H
volunteer Nicole Holdsworth, was able to explore the
parts of the seed and what plants need to grow and
thrive through experiments with seed germination
activity features in this month’s newsletter (see this
month’s “Lisa’s Activity” on page 10). After planting
their seeds in jars, they watched their seeds
germinate and grow into bean and corn plants over
the next three weeks, recording what they saw in their
seed journals. There was lots of learning to be had, and some students even took their plants home to plant them in soil and see if they would keep on growing. It will be interesting to find out what happens with this experiment!

Students expolore growing seeds.

Students expolore growing seeds.

Lisa’s 4-H Activity Challenge of the Month

A youth proudly displays the plant she grew.

A youth proudly displays the plant she grew.

Winter is just around the corner, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still have fun growing plants – in your class- room, club, or at home. Try this fun SEED GERMINATION experiment with your 4-H group or on your own and keep growing all year long!

Germinating Seeds

You Will Need:

  • Pint Mason Jars (wide mouth works best) or Clear Plastic Cups
  • Paper Towels or Construction Paper
  • Polyfill
  • Different types of seeds (bean, corn, pumpkin are good to work with)

Try It

1) Soak your seeds for 1 hour in a 10% bleach solution (1 tsp of bleach to one quart of water). Set aside once done soaking. This will help keep the seeds from growing mold.

2) In your glass jar or cup, line the sides with your paper towel or construction paper.

3) Fill the rest of the jar with tightly packed polyfill.

4) Add one inch of water to the bottom of the jar and allow the paper or towel to 
absorb the water.

5) Place four prepared seeds in between the paper and the jar or cup about a 
third of the way down. Use different kinds of seeds if possible.

6) Place the cups in a warm and sunny place and watch them grow! Be sure to 
keep about an inch of water in the bottom of your jar or cup.

7) Keep a log of how your seeds grow. Make a folding “book” for each seed in 
your jar to make it easy to write down what you see. Fold a long strip of 
paper so it looks like an accordion. Have 14 folded squares.

8) Label each folded square with a day number from 1 to 14. Each day, 
observe your seeds and draw a picture of what you see.

9) After the two weeks are up, unfold your “books” and look at the progress of 
your seeds.

Share & Process

What did you notice about how your seeds grew? Did one kind of seed grow faster than another or bigger? Where did the roots grow and from where did the stem and leaves grow? If some seeds grew and some did not, or some grew bigger than others, what conditions do you think affected how they grew? If you worked with a club or school group, how did each person’s jar differ from others? What environmental differences might have contributed – compare notes on location, warmth, light, water? Which factors do you think were the most important?

Generalize

What did you learn about how seeds respond to outside influences? How do you think people who live with- out sunlight for several months react to darkness? Why? How do people you know react to having less day- light here in Maine in the winter? How do plants and animals react when they have less water or the days are cold? Think about your garden or gardens you have. When do the plants seem to grow the fastest? What happens to them as we move into the colder nights in the fall?

Apply

If you were to teach another group to do this activity, how would you go about making sure they experienced success? How can you gather more information to better understand why there were differences in how the seeds grew? How could you apply what you learned to growing plants in a garden? What information was on your seed packets that may help when you plant these seeds in your garden?

For more seed germination experiments, challenges, information and trivia around this activity, check out our 4-H Gardening: See Them Sprout and Down-to-Earth: Enriching Learning Through Gardening curriculums. Variations of this activity can be found on pages 16 through 18 of the 4-H Gardening: See Them Sprout curriculum and pages 27 through 30 of that curriculum and Down-to-Earth: Enriching Learning Through Gardening curriculum. Both are available to borrow from our lending library.

4-H News from the State

 1. Celebrating 100 Years of 4-H in Maine- 2013 marks the 100th birthday of 4-H in Maine, and we want YOU to celebrate with us! Check with your local county office to find activities in your neck of the woods. Please check out our special “Celebrating 100 Years” website – we are also encouraging all of you to consider giving financially to the 4-H Foundation as we work to raise $100,000 in 2013 to support the 4-H program.

Happy 100 years Maine 4-H, and here’s to many more!

2. Beef Heifer Project- The New England Galloway Group is announcing their annual Heifer Project, which places a Belted Galloway heifer calf with a deserving youth recipient to allow for a hands-on education in beef cattle rearing and showmanship and to develop a love of the breed. The youth selected to receive a heifer is expected to return the first heifer calf back to the program so it will continue each year. If you are interested in applying for this program, you can download the application; the application deadline is December 31, 2013.

3. 4-H Rabbit Show- There will be a 4-H Rabbit Showmanship class at the Eastern Maine Rabbit Breeders open and youth show on Saturday, November 9, 2013 in Newport, ME. 4-Hers and potential 4-H members are welcome to show. Rabbits will be scored according to the 4-H showmanship standards in the 4-H rabbit curriculum book “What’s Hoppening?”.

To learn more about the show, directions, and how to prepare your rabbit, check the 4-H Rabbit Show page on our website.

4. Beef Conference- University of Maine Cooperative Extension is co-sponsoring the 24th Annual Maine Beef Conference on Saturday, December 7, 2013 in Bangor. The topics will be on Keeping Your Herd Healthy. For more information and to register, go to the Cooperative Extension Livestock page.

5. Save the Date for 2014 Maine 4-H Days- Maine 4-H Days will take place June 20 – 22, 2014 at the Windsor Fairgrounds. If you are interested in helping to plan next year’s event, please contact Jessy Brainerd at jessica.brainerd@maine.edu or 581.3877.

6. Market Steers for Windsor and Fryeburg- 4-Hers raising a steer for the 2014 market steer shows at Windsor or Fryeburg Fairs need to send in an Intent to Participate Form (Word) by January 3, 2014. We appreciate you completing your paperwork early. Please enroll or re-enroll as a 4-H member early, and send your Intent to Participate form to your county office. The earlier we receive your paperwork, the earlier we can begin tagging animals, and avoiding tagging during the winter months.

Congratulations to Newly Trained Master Gardener Volunteers

October 29th, 2013 11:20 AM

The University of Maine Cooperative Extension would like to welcome newly trained Master Gardener Volunteers. In order to become a Master Gardener Volunteer, participants must complete forty hours of horticulture training. The class this year learned basic botany, soil fertility, growing flowering annuals and perennials, growing trees, shrubs, ground covers and lawns, identifying invasive plants, landscape design principles, and managing garden problems organically. Once trained, Master Gardener Volunteers will provide forty hours of community service in their communities on a garden related project. Current projects in Washington County include community and demonstration gardens in several towns, school gardens in Eastport and Robbinston, historic garden restoration at the Gates House in Machiasport, the Burnham Tavern in Machias, and at the Pembroke Historical Society.

If you are interested in participating in the Master Gardener Volunteer Program, please contact Tara Wood at tara.a.wood@maine.edu or by telephone at 207-255-3345 or 1-800-287-1542.

Congratulations to newly trained Master Gardener Volunteers!  (left to right):  Nancy Neu, Liz Pingree, Leonora Celosse, Joan Miller, Janine Blaine, Blanche Barnes, David Meaker, Jennifer Prout, Lea Caron.

Congratulations to newly trained Master Gardener Volunteers! (left to right): Nancy Neu, Liz Pingree, Leonora Celosse, Joan Miller, Janine Blaine, Blanche Barnes, David Meaker, Jennifer Prout, Lea Caron.

Panel to Dish on Genetically Modified Foods

October 29th, 2013 9:33 AM

Machias, Maine — A free panel discussion about genetically modified foods will be held Wednesday, November 13, 6-7:30 p.m., at Kimball Hall at the University of Maine at Machias.

Genetically modified foods have had genes from other plants or animals inserted into their genetic codes. Alterations done in a laboratory are to improve certain traits, such as increased resistance to pests, herbicides and drought.

Panelists include Jim Gerritsen, an Aroostook County farmer and president of Organic Seed Growers and Trade Association; John Jemison, water quality and soil specialist with University of Maine Cooperative Extension; Eric Jones, assistant professor of plant biology at UMM; and Andrei Alyokhin, professor and graduate coordinator with UMaine’s School of Biology and Ecology. Following each panelist’s presentation, audience members will have an opportunity to ask questions. The event, which is open to the public, will be streamed live over the Internet and archived for future viewing at www.machias.edu/umm-live.

This is the second panel in the Food and Community Series sponsored by Psychology and Community Studies at UMM, UMaine Extension and the Libra Foundation. The third panel discussion, slated for the night of Dec. 11, will be about the Washington County Food System. For more information, contact Alan Majka at 207.255.3345 or Meghan Duff at 207.255.1227. To request a disability accommodation, call Jo Ellen Scribner at 207.255.1228.

About University of Maine at Machias:  The University of Maine at Machias is New England’s only public environmental liberal arts college, offering an undergraduate education uniquely grounded in the natural, social, cultural and economic environments of coastal Maine. As the smallest member of the University of Maine System, UMM enrolls an average of 1,000 students with a student-faculty ratio of 13:1, and offers degree programs in 12 fields of study.

About University of Maine Cooperative Extension:  As a trusted resource for almost 100 years, University of Maine Cooperative Extension has supported UMaine’s land and sea grant public education role by conducting community-driven, research-based programs in every Maine county. UMaine Extension helps support, sustain and grow the food-based economy. It is the only entity in our state that touches every aspect of the Maine Food System, where policy, research, production, processing, commerce, nutrition, and food security and safety are integral and interrelated. UMaine Extension also conducts the most successful out-of-school youth educational program in Maine through 4-H.

The University of Maine does not discriminate on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, including transgender status and gender expression, national origin, citizenship status, age, disability, genetic information or veteran’s status in employment, education, and all other programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding non-discrimination policies: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity, 101 North Stevens Hall, 207.581.1226.

Salmon Farming Downeast: Benefits and Controversies Panel Discussion

October 15th, 2013 9:36 AM

Have you ever wanted to learn more about that delicious salmon on your plate or those pens floating in local seas? All are invited to hear four experts discuss the economic, environmental and other impacts of salmon farming in Washington County. The free event will be held on Wednesday, October 16, from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m., at University of Maine, Machias, Kimball Hall, Portside Room. Speakers will include Chris Bartlett, Marine Extension Associate, Maine Sea Grant & UMaine Extension; Sebastian Belle, Executive Director, Maine Aquaculture Association; Dwayne Shaw, Executive Director, Downeast Salmon Federation; and Paul Molyneaux, author of Swimming in Circles: Aquaculture and the End of Wild Oceans. After each panelist gives a brief presentation, audience members will have the opportunity to ask questions. The event is the first in a series about the food we eat and is sponsored by University of Maine, Machias; University of Maine Cooperative Extension; and the Libra Foundation. For more information, please call 255-3345.

4-H News ~ October 2013

October 11th, 2013 9:12 AM

Volume 8, Issue 10

 

Dates to Remember

October 14 – Columbus Day – Office Closed

October 26 – 4-H at Tractor Supply Company (TSC) Grand Opening in Calais

November 2- 4-H Maps and Apps Day at University of Maine at Machias

November 27- Re-enrollment Forms Due

November 28 – Thanksgiving Day – Extension Office Closed

November 29 – Extension Office Closed

 

Hope C. Wins Herdsmen Award

Submitted by Tammy C. and Lisa R.

Congratulations to Hope of Princeton Pioneers for receiving the first place Herdsman award at the Litchfield Fair for her 4-H goat display there. In order to qualify for consideration for this award, Hope had to show at least three of her 4-H goats, give a live demonstration based on her 4-H project, and have her animals displayed at the fair for the public to view and visit. She also did quite well in the 4-H show winning her showmanship class with her original goat, Cookie Doe, and placing well in other breed classes, too. Hope has been in the 4-H goat project for four years and has built a very nice herd of fourteen goats from her original doe. Hope really enjoys this project, having made some great friends due to her participation in this fair and others. She shows no signs of stopping! Her plans with her 4-H project this coming year include continuing to show and breed with a focus on improving the quality of her herd — to “Make the Best Better”! That’s the 4-H way to go. Great job, Hope. We will look for more updates on your project over this 4-H year.

 

Hope wins Herdsmen Award at the Litchfield Fair.

Hope wins Herdsmen Award at the Litchfield Fair.

 

 

4-H Maps & Apps Science Day!

Photo Credit: www.4-h.org

Photo Credit: www.4-h.org

Saturday, November 2nd, 2013

9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

University of Maine at Machias

Science Building, Room 207

Grade Level: 6th – 8th grade

Maximum number of participants: 20

Registration Cost: $5

Local area youth, grades 6th -8th, will explore how mapping and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) work in their own community! Their challenge as a GIS team will be to design a local park! The youth and instructors will explore Global Positioning System (GPS) units, marking data points and taking pictures. We will examine and record the geographic landscape of a park, the available natural resources, any man-made structures, and more while in the field. The youth will then return to the classroom, where we will discuss what was discovered about the park site, and we will map our data and ideas in two different ways. First, we will work together to create maps on paper, allowing youth to learn the mapping process and brainstorm real-life applications and ideas for their park. The youth will then be able to put their knowledge to use with a real-life application! We will use a GIS computer program to create maps on the computer, just like real GIS Specialists! Youth will actively be able to participate in creating both the “paper” map and the computer maps (with 1 computer per 2 students). This project will allow local youth to explore geospatial technology through hands-on activities and learn the how the processes of inquiry, investigation, brainstorming, and development can be used to solve problems in their own communities. Please have youth bring a snack and drink for the morning break.

Schedule

9:00 – 9:25 AM – Learn about our challenge!

9:35 – 10:15 AM – In the field using GPS to take pictures & gather geographical information

10:15 – 10:30 AM – Return to classroom and break

10:30 – 11:15 AM – Hands-on mapping project

11:20 – Noon – Mapping on the computer

To register, please contact Tara Wood at the University of Maine Cooperative Extension office in Machias at 255.3345 or by email at tara.a.wood@maine.edu. Deadline to register is Friday, October 25th. There is a limit of 20 youth.

 

4-H Member Senior Photo

Amanda, a member of the Dennys River Manure Movers 4-H club, is a senior at Shead High School. For her senior pictures, she posed with the much beloved, Babe the Horse. Thank-you, Amanda, for sharing the beautiful picture!

Photo Credit: Susan Ward

Photo Credit: Susan Ward

 

Dennys River Manure Movers Last Meeting of the Year

Volunteer Jane Bell reported that the Dennys River Manure Movers met for the last time this year. Club members did ground work and rode “Babe” and “Cassie”. Jane expressed her thanks to Nancy Curtis for a great summer!

4-H Members and Horse

Photo Credit: 4-H member Maddie Submitted by Jane Bell Photo Credit: 4-H member Maddie
Submitted by Jane Bell

 

Lisa’s Corner

4-H National Youth Science Day Experiment 2013 –Maps & Apps

Each year in our county, we have the opportunity to participate in the 4-H 
National Youth Science Day (NYSD) Experiment. For our 4-H Schools, this means that
 I try to come in to the classroom and Afterschool programs to work with
 students on the experiment. Over the past years our 4-H’ers have had the
 chance to make their own wind turbines and generate electricity from them in
 our “Wired for Wind” experiment. And last year we introduced “Eco-bots” where we were challenged to make a model robot out of a tooth brush, to solve the complex problem of containing and cleaning up toxic waste.

This year there is a new experiment – Maps & Apps – where youth have the opportunity to develop geospatial skills and explore Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Global Positioning Systems (GPS). You can read more about this experiment in our 4-H State News in this newsletter and find many resources for this experiment online at www.4-H.org/NYSD.

Due to generous state 4-H grant funds, we have been gifted several 4-H NYSD “Maps & Apps” kits which are available to borrow from the office. I will also be visiting our 4-H schools wherever possible to help facilitate “Maps & Apps” and connect teachers and volunteers with additional University GPS and GIS resources to build on the learning from the experiment.

Remember also that while October is the official 4-H NYSD Experiment month, you can take the “Maps & Apps” challenge any time and any year that you like. We also continue to keep our “Wired for Wind” and “Eco-bot” NYSD kits in the office to loan. Please contact me at lisa.reilich@maine.edu or Joyce Fortier at joyce.fortier@maine.edu for more information or to schedule program support for any of these fabulous experiments.

Ella Lewis School students enjoyed the “Eco-bot” Science project.

Ella Lewis School students enjoyed the “Eco-bot” Science project.

Mount Desert Elementary School students participated in “Wired for Wind.”

Mount Desert Elementary School students participated in “Wired for Wind.”

 

Lisa’s 4-H Activity Challenge of the Month October 2013

This very fun and easy pumpkin activity appeared in our newsletter three years ago as a great idea for Thanksgiving; but with the fall weather here at last, all the pumpkins turning orange in the gardens and fields, and all of us thinking about what our Halloween pumpkin will look like this year, I thought this would be a great time to have something to do with all those pumpkins, and a yummy treat, too. I’d like to challenge our youth and leaders to try this activity with their 4-H clubs or Afterschool groups. The more friends and 4-H’ers you have to do this activity, the more fun it will be! I will also be featuring this activity at our Pumpkin Daze 4-H Awareness Days.

PUMPKIN PIE IN A BAG

American settlers made pumpkin pie inside of the pumpkin shell. They sliced off the pumpkin’s top, removed the seeds, and filled the insides with milk, spices and honey. It was baked in the hot ashes of a fireplace. Today you can make a modern version of pumpkin pie in a bag. The recipe below will serve six.

Gather your materials.

The ingredients you will need are:

Milk (very cold!), one package (four serving size) instant vanilla pudding, canned or cooked pumpkin, ground cinnamon, ground ginger, graham cracker crumbs, whipped topping

The other supplies you will need are:

Quart size zipper-type freezer bags, measuring cups, measuring spoons, six small 3-ounce cups, scissors, eating spoons

Step 1: In the zipper-type bag, collect 2/3 cup cold milk and a 1⁄2 package instant vanilla pudding mix. Remove the air and zip it shut. Squeeze and knead with hands for 1 minute until blended.

Step 2: Add to the bag 1⁄2 cup canned pumpkin, 1⁄4 teaspoon ground cinnamon, and 1/8 teaspoon ground ginger. Remove the air and zip it shut. Squeeze and knead with hands for 2 minutes until blended.

Step 3: Put one tablespoon of graham cracker crumbs into each of the six cups. Cut a corner of the freezer bag and squeeze the pie filling into the cups, dividing it equally.

Step 4: Add whipped cream to the top and enjoy. Yum!
I can’t wait to hear how it turns out. Maybe you will be able to make this at home for your next holiday dinner. But, if you do, be sure to save some for me!

You can find this activity and more in the 4-H Afterschool Agriculture: Acres of Adventures curriculum. This activity – with instructions on how to set it up in stations for a larger group – can be found in Book 2 of that series (Frontier Living, pages 54-55) and is available to borrow from our lending library.

 

Pumpkins

 

4-H News from the State

1. Robotics Expo - You’re invited to join us for a day of fun with robotics and science on Saturday, October 19, 2013, at the University of Southern Maine, Gorham campus. The event is open to any youth, ages 5-18, participating in or interested in 4-H robotics program. Prior robotics experience is not needed to attend. In the morning, individuals and teams will have the opportunity to share their ideas and creations with judges and other participants in a non-competitive ‘science fair’ format. During the day, youth participate in a workshop and in an on-site challenge event. Pre-registration is required.

To learn more information, please visit the website or contact Sarah Sparks, 1.800.287.1458 or sarah.sparks@maine.edu if you have any questions.

 

2. Get Ready for 4-H Maps & Apps – 4-H National Headquarters and National 4-H Council are pleased to reveal the National Science Experiment for the 2013 4-H National Youth Science Day. 4-H Maps & Apps will introduce youth to the power of geospatial technologies and their unique ability to help us understand and improve our communities.

Developed by Colorado State University Extension, this exciting activity will engage young people in ways to improve our environment with the help of geographic information systems (GIS) and global positioning systems (GPS).
The experiment will test the ability of young people to:

- Use geospatial skills to create the ideal neighborhood park,

- Become a community planner by using maps and layers to investigate and solve real-world problems, and

- Contribute data about their community to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), The National Map through The National Map Corps project.

Save the Date!
 This annual youth science event will be held on Wednesday, October 9, 2013, and will bring 4-H’ers together from all around the nation to complete this single, innovative activity. Participation in 4-H National Youth Science Day is meant to help spark an early passion for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education and to encourage young people to consider these paths of study and future careers.

To download the 2013 National Science Experiment Youth and Facilitator Guides as well as other key resources, visit the 4-H National Youth Science Day website.

 

3. Celebrating 100 Years of 4-H in Maine – 2013 marks the 100th birthday of 4-H in Maine, and we want YOU to celebrate with us! Check with your local county office to find activities in your neck of the woods. Please check out our special Celebrating 100 Years website  – we are also encouraging all of you to consider giving financially to the 4-H Foundation as we work to raise $100,000 in 2013 to support the 4-H program. Happy 100 years Maine 4-H, and here’s to many more!

 

4. Celebrating 100 Years in Maine with 100 4-H Geocaches! -

WHAT: Several 4-H clubs around the state are already preparing for 4-H National Youth Science Day and getting 4-H families excited about the world of Geospatial technology.

HOW: Clubs in Washington and Penobscot counties have launched geocaches at the club and/or county level. They have already hidden more than 10 geocaches! There is even a 4-H geocache hidden at the University of Maine. This is a fun way for our youth to explore Geospatial science and technology, as well as experience being part of a statewide collaborative! We do have resources available to help in our 4-H Science Geospatial Toolkits.

WHY: It would be great for Maine 4-H to create 100 geocaches to celebrate 100 years of 4-H in Maine! These could be for one time use with a club or designed for more frequent use. Would you like your family or 4-H club to be involved?

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Check with your county office to see what is happening at the local level or connect with Sarah Sparks at sarah.sparks@maine.edu, 353.5550 or 1.800.287.1458.

 

5. Beef Heifer Project – The New England Galloway Group is announcing their annual Heifer Project, which places a Belted Galloway heifer calf with a deserving youth recipient to allow for a hands-on education in beef cattle rearing and showmanship and to develop a love of the breed. The youth selected to receive a heifer is expected to return the first heifer calf back to the program so it will continue each year. If you are interested in applying for this program, you can download the application at our website.  The application deadline is December 31, 2013.

 

6. 4-H Rabbit Show – There will be a 4-H Rabbit Showmanship class at the Eastern Maine Rabbit Breeders open and youth show on Saturday, November 9, 2013 in Newport, Maine. 4-H’ers and potential 4-H members are welcome to show. Rabbits will be scored according to the 4-H showmanship standards in What’s Hoppening?

To learn more about the show, directions, and how to prepare your rabbit, check the 4-H Rabbit Show page on our website.

 

7. Beef Conference – University of Maine Cooperative Extension is co-sponsoring the 24th Annual Maine Beef Conference on Saturday, December 7, 2013 in Bangor. The topics will be on “Keeping Your Herd Healthy.” For more information and to register go to the Cooperative Extension Livestock page.

 

Cooking with the Kids

Carrot –Apple Salad Supreme

Ingredients:

1 (6 ounce) can concentrated orange juice, defrosted; 1 (6 ounce) can cold water
; 2 pounds carrots, scraped and shredded
; 3 apples, cored and shredded; 1 cup raisins
; and 1/2 cup coarsely chopped peanuts (optional)

Directions:

Place the juice and water in a mixing bowl.
 Add all the other ingredients except the peanuts. Mix well. At serving time mix in the peanuts.

Makes 8 – 10 servings

UMaine Extension