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Meet the Faculty - Curriculum Vitae For Douglas Allen

Addresses

6 Charles Street
Orono, Maine 04473
207-866-7782

Department of Philosophy
The Maples
University of Maine
Orono, Maine 04469 U.S.A.
Telephone: 207-581-3866; Fax: 207-581-2928
E-mail: dallen@maine.edu or  douglas.allen@umit.maine.edu

Education

Yale University          New Haven, CT.    1959-63      B.A Philosophy
Banaras Hindu Univ.   Varanasi, India      1963-64      Indian Philosophy
Vanderbilt Univ.         Nashville, TN.       1964-67      M.A.Philosophy
1971          Ph.D. Philosophy

Areas of Specialization

Phenomenology (especially Phenomenology of Religion); Eastern Philosophy and Religion (especially Hinduism and Buddhism); History of Religions (Religionswissenshaft); Mircea Eliade; Mahatma Gandhi;Marxism and Political Philosophy (especially Marx); Comparative Philosophy and Religion.

Teaching Experience

Banaras Hindu Univ.                             1963-64                 Fulbright Instructor

Southern Illinois Univ                           1967-72                 Instructor, Assistant Professor

Vanderbilt University                            1972-73                 Visiting Assistant Professor

Central Connecticut State                    1973-74                 Assistant Professor

University of Maine                                  1974-                Assistant Professor; Associate Prof.;

Full Prof. (1981); Graduate Faculty;

Chairperson, Philosophy (1979-82,1998-2003)

Courses taught at University of Maine:

Introd. to Philosophy; Introd. to Religious Studies; Social Issues in Recent Religious and Philosophical Thought; Problems of Philosophy;  Marxist Philosophy; Twentieth Century Marxist Philosophy; The Nature of Religious Experience; Hinduism; Buddhism; Views of Self: East and West; Theories of Myth; Mircea Eliade; Mahatma Gandhi. Other courses taught: Ethics; History of Modern Philosophy; Philosophy of Religion; Afro-American Philosophy; Graduate seminars on Indian Philosophy and Phenomenology of Religion.

Publications

Vanderbilt Dissertation: “The History of Religions and Eliade’s Phenomenology”

Yale Honors Thesis: “Albert Camus: His Struggle with Nihilism.”

Books

  • Structure and Creativity in Religion: Hermeneutics in Mircea Eliade’s Phenomenology and New Directions. The Hague, Paris, and New York: Mouton Publishers, 1978, xviii + 266 pp.
  • Mircea Eliade: An Annotated Bibliography, Co-authored with Dennis Doeing. New York: Garland Publishers, 1980, xxii + 262 pp.
  • Mircea Eliade et le phénomène religieux. Paris: Payot Editions, 1982, 276 pp.
  • Mircea Eliade y el fenomeno religioso. Madrid: Ediciones Christiandad, 1985, 301 pp.
  • Indochina and the War, Co-edited with Ngo Vinh Long, Special Issue of the Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars 21, Nos. 2-4 (April-Dec. 1989), 212 pp.
  • Coming to Terms: Indochina, the United States, and the War, Co-edited with Ngo Vinh Long. Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1991, x + 350 pp.
  • Religion and Political Conflict in South Asia: India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka, Editor. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Publishers, 1992, x + 230 pp.
  • Religion and Political Conflict in South Asia: India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka, Editor. Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1993.
  • The Philosophies of India (Nashville, Tenn.: Knowledge Products, 1996). This 120-page script for cassettes in “The World of Philosophy” series is narrated by Lynn Redgrave.
  • Culture and Self: Philosophical and Religious Perspectives, East and West, Editor. Boulder,  Colo.: Westview Press/Harper Collins, 1997, xvii + 184 pp.
  • Myth and Religion in Mircea Eliade. New York: Garland Publishers, 1998, xi + 380 pp. Paperback edition: Routledge, 2002.
  • Comparative Philosophy in Times of Terror. Editor. Lexington Books, forthcoming.
  • The Philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi for the Twenty-First Century. Editor, forthcoming.

Articles and Chapters in Books

  • “The Aesthetics of Albert Camus,” Criticism and Research, ed. by N.M. Kalkarni, V. Rai, T.N. Singh, and A.P. O’Brein (Varanasi, India: Lakshmi Das, 1964): 145-58.
  • “Is Academic Freedom Still a Viable Principle?” Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars 3 (Spring 1971): 21-26.
  • “Mircea Eliade’s Phenomenological Analysis of Religious Experience,” The Journal of Religion 5 2 (April 1972): 170-86.
  • Translated as “L’analyse phénoménologique de l’expérience religieuse,”in Mircea Eliade, ed. by Constantin Tacou (Paris: Editions de L’Herne, 1978): 128-38.
  • “A Phenomenological Evaluation of Religious Mysticism,” Darshana International 12  (July 1972): 71-78.
  • “Givenness and Creativity,” Journal of Thought 8 (Nov. 1973): 270-78.
  • “Universities and the Vietnam War: A Case Study of a Successful Struggle,” Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars 8 (Oct.-Dec. 1976): 2-16.
  • “Max Müller: India, Europe, and the Origin of Religion,” in Philosophical Reflections | (Dr. B.L. Atreya Souvenir Volume: Part 2), ed. by R.S. Srivastava (New Delhi: Oriental Publishers, 1977): 243-51.
  • “Tylor, Otto, and the Irreducibility of the Religious,” Darshana International 17 (Fall 1977): 17-29.
  • “Phenomenological Method and the Dialectic of the Sacred,” in Imagination and Meaning, ed.
    by Norman J. Girardot and Mac Linscott Ricketts (New York: Seabury Press, 1982): 70-81.
  • “Ist Eliade antihistorisch?” in Die Mitte der Welt, ed. by Hans Peter Duerr (Frankfurt am Main:
    Suhrkamp Verlag, 1984): 106-27.
  • “Essential Religious Structures and Problems of Generalization,” in Current Progress in the
    Methodology of the Science of Religions, ed. by Witold Tiloch (Warsaw: Polish Scientific
    Publishers, 1984): 21-29.
  • “Vietnam and Central America,” Lanka Guardian 8 (Colombo, Sri Lanka, Jan. 15, 1986): 15-19.
  • “Edmund Husserl,” in The Encyclopedia of Religion, Vol. 6 (New York: Macmillan, 1987),  pp. 538-40.
  • “Phenomenology of Religion,” in The Encyclopedia of Religion, Vol. 11 (New York: Macmillan, 1987), pp. 272-85.
  • “Chattopadhyaya’s Marxian Interpretation of Indian Philosophy, History, and Society,” Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars 19 (April-June 1987): 60-66.
  • “Iran-Contragate: What You’ll Never See in the Establishment Media,” Lanka Guardian 11 (Colombo, Sri Lanka, May 15, 1988): 17-18.
  • “Eliade and History,” The Journal of Religion 68 (Oct. 1988): 545-65.
  • “Marxism and Buddhism: Similarities and Differences, Especially Regarding the Self,” The Maine Scholar 1 (Fall 1988): 145-55.
  • “Introduction,” Indochina and the War, in Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars 21, Nos. 2-4 (April-Dec. 1989): 3-4.
  • “Antiwar Asian Scholars and the Vietnam/Indochina War,” Indochina and the War, in Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars 21, Nos. 2-4 (April-Dec. 1989): 112-34
  • “Is There Any Connection Between Studying the Humanities and Becoming an Ethical Person?” Southern Humanities Review 24, No. 1 (Winter 1990): 33-47.
  • “American Mythology: The Persian Gulf War as Myth,” Lanka Guardian 14, No 9 (Colombo, Sri Lanka, Sept. 1, 1991): 13, 23, and Lanka Guardian 14, No. 10 (Sept. 15, 1991): 19-20.
  • “Scholars of Asia and the War,” in Coming to Terms: Indochina, the United States,and the War, ed. by Douglas Allen and Ngo Vinh Long (Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1991). pp. 211-49.
  • “Preface” (pp. vii-viii), “Introduction” (1-6), “Chronology” (303-20), and “Bibliography” (321-25) in Coming to Terms (Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press,1991).
  • “Religious-Political Conflict in Sri Lanka: Philosophical Considerations,” in Religion and Political Conflict in South Asia: India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka, ed. by Douglas Allen (Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Publishers, 1992), pp. 181-203.
  • “Preface,” “Introduction” (1-14), and “Bibliography” (205-215) in Religion and Political Conflict in South Asia: India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Publishers, 1992).
  • “Mircea Eliade,” in the Encyclopedia of Contemporary Literary Theory: Approaches, Scholars,
    Terms
    , ed. by Irena Makaryk (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1993), pp. 306-308.
  • “Gandhi’s Philosophy: The Struggle Over Many Contradictory Philosophies,” Social Theory and Practice 19, No. 3 (Fall 1993): 289-313.
  • “Philosophical Foundations of Gandhi’s Legacy, Utopian Experiments, and Peace Struggles,”  Gandhi Marg 16, No. 2 (July-Sept. 1994): 133-60.
  • “U.S. Left Scholars and the Vietnam/Indochina War,” in Proceedings of the Radical Philosophy Association, Volume I (Dec. 1994), pp. 41-70.
  • “Recent Defenders of Eliade: A Critical Evaluation,” Religion 24 (Dec. 1994): 333-51.
  • “Social Constructions of Self: Some Asian, Marxist, and Feminist Critiques of Dominant Western Views of  Self,” in Culture and Self: Philosophical and Religious Perspectives, East and West ed. by Douglas Allen (Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press/Harper Collins, 1997), pp. 3-26.
  • “Preface,” “Introduction,” and “Bibliography” in Culture and Self: Philosophical and Religious Perspectives, East and West, ed. by Douglas Allen (Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press/Harper Collins, 1997), pp. ix-xv and 163-72.
  • “The Enlightenment,” in The Encyclopedia of Politics and Religion (Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly, Inc., 1998).
  • “Violence and Nonviolence,” Philosophy and Social Action: Philosophy, Science, and Society 24, No. 2 (April-June 1998): 15-22.
  • “Foreword,” Geeta—The Philosophy of Practical Life, Vol. 11, by V.B.N. Bakshy  (Bombay and Delhi: Somaiya Publications, forthcoming).
  • “Debiprasad Chattopadhyaya: Marxism, Indian Philosophy, and the History of Science,” in  Essays in Honour of Professor Debiprasad Chattopadhyaya, ed. by O. P. Jaiswal (forthcoming.)
  • “Gandhian Perspectives on Self-Other Relations as Relevant to Human Values and SocialChange Today,” in Human Values and Social Change, Vol. I, ed. by Ishwar Modi (Jaipur and New Delhi: Rawat Publications, 2000), pp. 283-309
  • “Humanitarian Intervention: The U.S.-NATO Domination,” Philosophy and Social Action: Philosophy, Science, and Society 26, Nos. 1-2 (January 2000): 93-98.
  • “L’ermeneutica di Mircea Eliade e la storia delle religioni,” in Esploratori del Pensiero Umano: Georges Dumézil e Mircea Eliade, ed. by Julien Ries and Natale Spineto. (Milan: Jaca Book, 2000), pp. 311-29.
  • “Gandhi, Contemporary Political Thinking, and Self-Other Relations,” in Contemporary Political Thinking, ed. by B. N Ray  (New Delhi: Kanishka Publishers, 2000), pp. 129-70.
  • “Mircea Eliade’s View of the Study of Religion as the Basis for Cultural and Spiritual Renewal,”in Changing Religious Worlds: The Meaning and End of Mircea Eliade, ed. by Bryan Rennie (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2001), pp. 207-33.
  • “Cause and Structure of Power: Terrorism,” Philosophy and Social Action: Philosophy, Science, and Society 28, No. 1 (Jan.-Mar. 2002): 15-19.
  • “Mahatma Gandhi,” The Philosophers’ Magazine (Jan. 2003): 52.
  • “Eliade Hermeneutics and the Reception of the History of Religion,” in Deux Explorateurs de la Pensée Humaine: Georges Dumézil et Mircea Eliade, ed. By Julien Ries and Natale Spineto (Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols Publishers, 2003), pp. 245-61.
  • “Philosophical Foundations of Gandhi’s Legacy, Utopian Experiments, and Peace Struggles,” in Non-Violence, Peace, and Politics: Understanding Gandhi, ed. by Naresh Dadhich (Jaipur India: Aavishkar Publishers, 2003), pp. 1-39.
  • “American Arrogance of Power: Threat to World Peace and U.S.,” Philosophy and Social Action: Philosophy, Science, and Society 29, Nos. 3-4 (July-Dec. 2003): 37-39.
  • “Mircea Eliade and Platonism,” in Revue Roumaine de Philosophie (Bucharest: forthcoming).
  • “Major Contributions of Philosophical Phenomenology and Hermeneutics to the Study of Religion,” in How to Do Comparative Religion: Three Ways, Many Goals, forthcoming.
  • “Mahatma Gandhi,” in The Great Thinkers A-Z, ed. By Julian Baggini and Jeremy Stangroom (London: Continuum, 2004), pp. 103-105.
  • “Edmund Husserl,” in The Encyclopedia of Religion, 2nd ed. (New York: Macmillan, forthcoming).
  • “Phenomenology of Religion,” in The Encyclopedia of Religion, 2nd ed. (New York: Macmillan, forthcoming).
  • “The Platonic Eliade,” in Neoplatonism and American Thought, ed. by Jay Bregman (Albany: State University of New York Press, forthcoming).
  • “Phenomenology of Religion,” in The Routledge Companion to the Study of Religion, ed. by John Hinnells (London: Routledge, forthcoming).
  • “Gandhi After 9/11: Terrorism, Violence, and the Other,” in Comparative Philosophy in Times of Terror, ed, by Douglas Allen (Lantham, Md.: Lexington, forthcoming).
  • “Mircea Eliade,” in Encyclopaedia Britannica (new edition, forthcoming).

Reviews

  • Konstantin Kolenda, ed., Creativity and Openness: Essays in Honor of James Street Fulton, in Philosophy and Rhetoric 10 (1977): 138-41.
  • Guilford Dudley III, Religion on Trial: Mircea Eliade and His Critics, in Religion 10 (Spring 1980): 133-37.
  • Mircea Eliade, A History of Religious Ideas, Vol. 1: From the Stone Age to the Eleusinian Mysteries, in Heythrop Journal 21 (1980): 207-209.
  • Wilfred Cantwell Smith, Faith and Belief, in Religious Studies Review 7 (April 1981): 140-41.
  • Helen B. Lamb, Studies in India and Vietnam, in Journal of Asian andAfrican Studies 17 (1982): 146-48.
  • Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Knowledge and the Sacred, in Religious Studies Review 10 (April 1984):
    153.
  • Mircea Eliade, A History of Religious Ideas, Vol. 2: From Gautama Buddha to the Triumph of Christianity, and Mircea Eliade, Ordeal by Labyrinth:Conversations with Claude-Henri Rocquet, in Heythrop Journal 26 (April 1985): 206-209.
  • T.R.V. Murti, Studies in Indian Thought: The Collected Papers of Professor T.R.V. Murti, ed. by Harold Coward, in Journal of Asian Studies 44 (May 1985): 632-33.
  • Dennis Hickey, Home from Exile: An Approach to Post-Existentialist Philosophizing, in Religious Studies Review 12 (Jan. 1986): 48.
  • Antonio Negri, Marx Beyond Marx: Lessons on the Grundrisse, in Southern Humanities Review 20 (Spring 1986): 190-94.
  • Richard Eugene Wentz, The Contemplation of Otherness: The Critical Vision of Religion, in Religious Studies Review 12 (July-Oct. 1986): 264.
  • Robert Bohm, Notes on India, in Journal of Asian Studies 45 (August 1986): 873-74.
  • Joanna Macy, Dharma and Development: Religion as Resource in the Sarvodaya Self-Help Movement, in Philosophy East and West 37 (Jan. 1987): 97-100.
  • Debiprasad Chattopadhyaya, Knowledge and Intervention: Studies in Society and Consciousness, in Philosophy East and West 38 (1988): 79-82.
  • Mircea Eliade, A History of Religious Ideas, Vol. 3: From Muhammad to the Age of Reforms, in Heythrop Journal 29 (Oct. 1988): 520-21.
  • Ivan Strenski, Four Theories of Myth in Twentieth-Century History, in Journal of the American Academy of Religion 59 (Winter 1991): 874-77.
  • Gene Sharp, Civilian-Based Defense: A Post-military Weapons System, in Radical Philosophy Review of Books, No. 5 (1992): 40-45.
  • Richard Gombrich and Gananath Obeyesekere, Buddhism Transformed, in Philosophy East and West 42 (April 1992): 375-78.
  • Mac Linscott Ricketts, Mircea Eliade: The Romanian Roots, 1907-1945, 2 vols., in Journal of the American Academy of Religion 60 (Spring 1992): 174-77.
  • Tariq Ali, Revolution from Above: Where is the Soviet Union Going? in Southern Humanities Review 24 (Fall 1992): 361-63.
  • Carl Olson, The Theology and Philosophy of Eliade: A Search for the Centre, in The Journal of Religion 74 (July 1994): 438-39.
  • David Cave, Mircea Eliade’s Vision for a New Humanism, in The Journal of Religion 74 (Oct. 1994):        591-92.
  • Thomas A. Idinopulos and Edward A. Yonan, eds., Religion and Reductionism: Essays on Eliade, Segal, and the Challenge of the Social Sciences for the Study of Religion, in ARC: Journal of Faculty of Religious Studies, McGill University 27 (1999): 215-17.
  • Gavin Flood, Beyond Phenomenology: Rethinking the Study of Religion, in International Journal of Hindu Studies 3 (August 1999): 206-207.
  • Bryan S. Rennie, Reconstructing Eliade: Making Sense of Religion, in Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science 36 (1): 187-90 (March 2001).

Editorships

  • Editorial Board, Vietnam Quarterly 1975-76.
  • Editorial Board, Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars, 1976-present. (Journal name changed to Critical Asian Studies, 2001.)
  • Editorial Board, Philosophy and Social Criticism, 1976-present.
  • Editorial Board, Gandhian Studies, 1997-present. (Journal name changed to Gandhi and Peace Studies, 2001.)
  • Editorial Board, Archaevs (Romania), 2002-present.
  • Editor of Book Series, “Studies in Comparative Philosophy and Religion,” Lexington Books, 2002-present.

Honors

  • Fulbright Grant to India, 1963-64.
  • NDEA Fellowship to Vanderbilt University, 1964-67.
  • Many teaching honors, including being selected by the undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty of the Dept. of Philosophy for the “Outstanding Teaching Award” at Southern Illinois University; and being chosen by the 200 President’s Scholars (the honors students) at Southern Illinois University to teach the first student initiated seminars.
  • Five proposals have been funded as Faculty Summer Research Grants at the University of Maine, 1976, 1978, 1983, 1991, and 1997.
  • Was one of three scholars from the United States selected to participate in the “Methodological Conference” in religion held in Warsaw in 1979.
  • Structure and Creativity in Religion was selected by the American Council of Learned Societies to share first prize for the best first book in the history of religions published during the past four years, 1982.
  • Listed in the Directory of American Scholars, various Who’s Who editions, and other similar publications.
  • Selected as a member of the Maine Humanities Council, 1980-84.
  • Selected as the representative for the Mellon Fellowships in the Humanities at the University of Maine, 1982-present.
  • Selected as the Faculty Representative to the University of Maine Board of Trustees, 1982-84.
  • NEH Fellowship to attend Teaching Institution on “Marxism and the Interpretation of Culture,” University of Illinois, June-July 1983.
  • Smithsonian Institution Fellowship for research in India on “Views of the Self: East and West,” 1985-1986; fall 1992.
  • “Honorary Visiting Professor,” University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka, Jan.-Feb., 1986.
  • “Visiting Scholar,” Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, Delhi, and Centre for Social Studies, Surat, India, Feb.-April 1986.
  • Grant to Institute for Ecumenical and Cultural Research, Collegeville, Minnesota for research on Mircea Eliade on Myth, 1991-1992.
  • “Visiting Professor” at Centre for Study of Social Sciences, Calcutta; Dept of Philosophy, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi; and Indian Institute of Technology, Madras; Sept.-Dec. 1992.
  • Elected co-chair of Program Committee of Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy, 1993-1994; Chair, Program Committee, 1994-present.
  • Selected for a University Sabbatical (one of five professors), 1991-1992, 1997-1998.
  • Selected as the Distinguished Professor of the College of Arts and Humanities, University of Maine, 1995, 1996, 1997; College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 1998, 1999, 2000.
  • “Visiting Scholar” at the University of Delhi, India, Nov. 1997-Jan. 1998.
  • Grant from the American Academy of Religion to do research in Israel, March-May 1998.
  • Received the 1998 Presidential Research and Creative Achievement Award. (One professor a the University of Maine is selected for the Presidential Award each year.)
  • Selected to give the Commencement Address at the Commencement of the University of Maine, Dec. 1998.
  • Received the 2000 Distinguished Maine Professor Award (the highest honor for a professor at the University of Maine, given for teaching, research, and service).
  • Elected Vice President of the Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy, 1999-2000.
  • Elected President of the Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy, 2001-present.
  • Elected to a three-year term on the national American Philosophical Association Committee on the Status of Asian and Asian-American Philosophers and Philosophies.
  • Visiting Scholar, the New Europe College, Bucharest, May-June 2002; Oct. 2003.
  • Invited as one of three keynote speakers at international conference on Approaches in Comparative Religion, University of Helsinki, Nov. 2002.
  • Director of international conference on Comparative Philosophy in Times of Terror, Asilomar Conference Grounds, California, May 2003.
  • Visiting Scholar at the Madhya Pradesh Institute of Social Science Research in Ujjain and the Indian Institute of Technology Madras.
  • Invited to give the major Valedictory Address on “Peace Education and Gandhi” at  the International Conference on Peace Education for Contemporary Concerns at the University
    of Rajasthan, Jaipur, Jan. 2004
  • Invited to give the Extramural Lecture on “What Gandhi Would Say About 9/11/ the War on Terrorism, and the Iraq War,” attended by 400-500, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Jan. 2004.

Papers Presented

The following are major scholarly papers presented since 1974:

  • “Religious Symbolism, Ontological Moves, and Levels of Generality,” presented at conference on “The Encounter Between Archaic and Contemporary Reality,” Santa Barbara, 1974.
  • “Phenomenological Method and the Dialectic of the Sacred,” presented at  conference on “Coincidentia Oppositorum: The Scholarly and Literary Works of Mircea Eliade,” Notre Dame, 1978.
  • “Phenomenological Method and the Dialectic of the Sacred,” presented at annual meeting of the Maine Philosophical Institute, 1978.
  • “Phenomenological Method and Religion,” presented at King’s College, University of London, 1979.
  • “Mircea Eliade and Phenomenology,” presented at the University of Lancaster, 1979.
  • “Essential Religious Structures and Problems of Generalization,” presented at the “Methodological Conference of the International Association for the History of Religions,” Warsaw, 1979.
  • “Perspectives on the Transcendence of the Ego: The Bhagavad-Gita, the Buddhist Pali Canon, and the Writings of Karl Marx,” presented at the International Research Conference for Asian and Comparative Philosophy, “Interpreting Across Boundaries,” Hawaii, 1984.
  • “Philosophical Analysis of the Transcendence of the Ego: Hindu, Buddhist, and Marxian Perspectives,” presented at conference on “Marxism and Religion: Their Changing Dynamic, “University of Northern Iowa, 1984.
  • “The Buddha, Marx, and the Gita,” “Is There a Crisis in the Comparative Study of Religion?” and “Nonviolence and Civil Disobedience: Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr.,” presented as the “Philosophy, Religion, and Psychology Lecture Series, 1986,” sponsored by Dept. of Philosophy, University of Peradeniya, and Sri Lanka Philosophical Society.
  • “Major Aspects of the Philosophy of Karl Marx,” presented at Madurai Kamaraj University and Indian Institute of Technology-Madras, 1986.
  • “Lessons of the War in Vietnam and Central America,” presented at the Centre for Social Studies, South Gujarat University, Surat, India, 1986.
  • “Hindu, Buddhist, and Marxian Critiques of the Modern Western Self,” presented at the Indian Institute of Technology-Madras, the Centre for Social Studies, Surat, and the Graduate Centre Seminars, Middlesex Polytechnic, London, 1986.
  • “Is Eliade Antihistorical?” presented at the New England Meetings of the American Academy of Religion, Wellesley College, 1987.
  • “Interpreting Mircea Eliade” and “Critiques of the Western Self,” presented at the University of Vermont, 1987.
  • “Marxism and Buddhism: Philosophical Foundations, Some Similarities and Differences,” presented at the Association of Asian Studies, 1988.
  • “Can Humanities Studies Make One Ethical? A Qualified ‘Yes’,” presented at the South Atlantic Modern Language Association, Washington, D.C., 1988.
  • “On Becoming a Person: Marx, Buddha, and the Humanities,” presented at the University of Southern Maine, 1989.
  • “The Historical and Cultural Constitution of Concepts of the Self,” presented at the Sixth East-West Philosophers’ Conference, Hawaii, 1989.
  • “Indian, Marxist, and Feminist Critiques of the Self,” presented at Eastern Division of the American Philosophical Association, New York, 1991.
  • “Religious-Political Conflict: Philosophical Issues” and “Mircea Eliade’s Theory of Religious Myth,” presented at St. John’s University, Minnesota, 1991-92.
  • Ten scholarly papers, primarily on “Views of Self: East and West” and “Religious-Political Conflict in India,” presented in India, Sept.-Dec. 1992.
  • “Eliade’s Theory of Religion,” presented at University of Miami, 1993, 1994, 1995.
  • “Constructions of Self as a Key to Understanding Cultural Diversity” and “Religious-Political Conflict in India: Is Philosophy Completely Irrelevant?” presented at Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy Conference on “Ways of Understanding Cultural Diversity,” Hancock, Massachusetts, 1993.
  • “Class and Gender: ‘Unhappy Marriage’ or Dialectical Relation,” presented at statewide Conference on Class and Gender, University of Maine, 1994.
  • “U.S. Scholars and the Vietnam/Indochina War,” presented at the First National Radical Philosophy Conference, Drake University, 1994.
  • “East and West: Culture and Self,” presented at the opening of an art exhibit at the Farnsworth Museum, Rockland Maine, 1995.
  • “Marx: Enlightened or Romantic?” and “Sounding the Retreat: Postwar Philosophy,” presented at Arts and Humanities Month, University of Maine, 1994, 1995.
  • “Social Constructions of Self: Asian, Marxist, and Feminist Critiques of Dominant Western Views of Self,” presented as the College of Arts and Humanities Distinguished Lecture, University of Maine, 1995.
  • “Social Constructions of Self: Indian, Marxist, and Feminist Contributions,” presented at Eastern Division of the American Philosophical Association, New York, 1995.
  • “Buddhist and Marxist Critiques of the Dominant Western Construction of Self” and “Group Hatred,” presented at the Second National Radical Philosophy Conference, Purdue University, 1996.
  • “The Ambiguous Reception of Mircea Eliade in the USA: The Historical, the Political, and the Scholarly” and “Debiprasad Chattopadhyaya’s Marxist Challenge: What is Living and What is Dead in Indian Philosophy and Religion,” presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion, New Orleans, 1996.
  • “The Philosophies of India,” presented at Bergen Community College, 1997.
  • “Gandhi’s Approach to ‘the Self’: Creative Possibilities for Philosophical Reflection or Hopelessly Nonphilosophical?” presented at the Maine Philosophical Institute, 1997.
  • “Self and Other in India: The Philosophy of Mohandas Gandhi,” presented at the Fourth Annual Meeting of the International Association for Asian Philosophy and Religion, Los Angeles, 1997.
  • “Self and Other in the Philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi” (and similar topics), presented at Banaras Hindu University, the University of Rajasthan, the Indian Institute of Technology- Madras, the Institute of Gandhian Studies at Warda, the University of Delhi, and the National Institute of Social Work and Social Sciences at Bhubaneswar, Nov. 1997-Jan. 1998.
  • Lectures on the self-other relation in Hindu and Jewish philosophy at Bar-Ilan University and Hebrew University in Israel, April-May 1998.
  • Lectures on “The Philosophy and Religion of Mohandas Gandhi,” Florida International University (1999), and “Nonviolence, Truth, and Morality: Mahatma Gandhi’s Religious, Philosophical, and Political Alternatives to Dominant Western Values,” University of Miami (2000).
  • Lecture on “The Impact of Philosophical Phenomenology on the Study of Religion,” and chaired sessions on “Human Rights” and the “Philosophy of Religion” at the 18th Quinquennial World Congress of the International Association for the History of Religions (IAHR), Durban, South Africa, August 2000.
  • Lectures on “Terror and Terrorism” including “Struggling with Terror and Terrorism: What the Religion and Philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi Can Tell Us About the Tragedy of September 11,” Florida International University, and “Swimming in the Sea of Terror and Terrorism: Origins, Nature, and Solutions to the Tragedy of September 11,” University of Miami (2002).
  • Lectures on “Mircea Eliade and Platonism,” “The Scientific Posterity of Mircea Eliade,” “Eliade: 15 Years Later,” and “Terror and Terrorism” in Romania at New Europe College, University of Bucharest, Institute of Philosophy of the Romanian Academy, Spiru Haret University, and Constantin Brancaveanu University (May-June 2002).
  • Lecture on “Mircea Eliade’s Phenomenology of Religion and Platonism,” Conference on Platonism, Neoplatonism, and Literature, University of Maine (June 2002).
  • Keynote lecture on “Major Contributions of Philosophical Phenomenology and Hermeneutics to the Study of Religion, “ Conference on Approaches in Comparative Religion Reconsidered, Helsinki, Nov. 2002.
  • Lecture on “What Mahatma Gandhi Would Say About 9/11 and the War on Terrorism, ” presented at the Eastern Division of the American Philosophical Association, Philadelphia, 2002.
  • Lecture on “The Self, Phenomenology, and Globalization,” at international conference on Comparative Philosophy in Times of Terror, Asilomar, May 2003.
  • Two lectures on the Philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi for the Twenty-First Century: Violence and Nonviolence, and Unity and Diversity, World Congress of Philosophy, Istanbul, August 2003.
  • Six lectures (two on philosophical phenomenology and hermeneutics, two on Mahatma Gandhi, one on Mircea Eliade, and one on Indian philosophy) in Romania at New Europe College, Institute of Philosophy of the Romanian Academy, Spiru Haret University, Brasov Transilvania University and Constantin Brancaveanu University (Oct. 2003).
  • Twelve lectures, mainly on a variety of Gandhi topics (Peace Education, Truth and Nonviolence, Self Relations, Gandhi and Terrorism, the Iraq War, Gandhi after 9/11), at the International Conference on Peace Education for Contemporary Concerns at the University of Rajasthan, the Madhya Pradesh Institute of Social Science Research and Vikram University in Ujjain, Dept. of Philosophy at Banaras Hindu University, Gandhi Institute of Studies in Varanasi, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, and Centre for the Studies of Developing Societies in Delhi (Jan.-Feb. 2004).

The following are some of the other papers presented at conferences and to university, high school, and community gatherings:

  • The Nature of Religious Experience
  • The Nature of Religious Symbolism
  • Creativity and Religion
  • Introduction to Oriental Philosophy
  • Talks on Hinduism and Buddhism
  • The Political and the Spiritual
  • Ego vs. Enlightenment in Oriental Phil.
  • India: Where Does It Go from Here?
  • The Foundations of Marxism
  • Major Contributions of Karl Marx
  • Marx and Judaism
  • Major Contributions of V.I. Lenin
  • Marx, Lenin, and the Soviet Union
  • Marxism and Buddhism
  • What is Feminism?
  • Modern Feminist Theory
  • Feminism: West and Third World
  • Feminism and Marxism
  • The Power of Meditation
  • Philosophical Basis of Vegetarianism
  • The New Religious Cults
  • The Ethics of Affluence
  • The Concept of Justice
  • The Meaning of Democracy
  • Lessons of the Holocaust
  • Nonviolent Civil Disobedience
  • Academe and “the Real World”
  • The Nature of the University
  • World Hunger: Myths and Realities
  • The Significance of Jean-Paul Sartre

Many talks on Vietnam/Indochina War: roots of war, Vietnamese culture and history, Vietnamization, lessons of Vietnam, antiwar movement, scholars of Asia and the war. The Nuclear Arms Race The Draft Understanding Iran

  • El Salvador and U.S. Policy
  • Vietnam Lessons and Central America
  • Many talks on South Africa, apartheid, university investments
  • Many talks on the Middle East/Persian Gulf conflict (Iraq, Islam, etc.)
  • Many talks on racism on anti-Semitism
  • Diversity: the Jewish Experience
  • Jewish views of justice
  • Jewish views of self
  • Many talks on peace and peace with justice
  • Peace Activism
  • Religious-Political Conflict in India/Sri Lanka/South Asia
  • Many talks on the Philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi
  • Many talks on the Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Nonviolence: King and Gandhi
  • Myth and Religion
  • Kosovo, Serbia, NATO, and the U.S.
  • Conflict Resolution: Why the Personal, Without the Global, Will Not Lead to Peace and Justice
  • Truth and Reconciliation: The South African Experience
  • Free Speech, Advertising, and Holocaust Deniers
  • Teaching and Learning in the 21st Century
  • Swimming in the Seas of Terror and Terrorism
  • The Politics of 9/11
  • The U.S. Iraq War

Other Activities (since 1974)

Faculty advisor, financial advisor, and active participant in Maine Peace Action Committee, 1974-present. Write an article for every issue of the Maine Peace Action Committee Newsletter. Coordinate the weekly Peace and Justice Film Series.

  • Arts and Sciences Interdisciplinary Studies Committee, 1976-present.
  • Coordinator of Religious Studies Interdisciplinary Program, 1976-84.
  • Coordinator of Marxist-Socialist Studies Interdisciplinary Program and Minor, 1976-present.
  • Coordinator of Peace Studies Interdisciplinary Program, 1987-1988.
  • Outside examiner/evaluator at Univ. of Ottawa (1975), Univ. of Vermont (1978), Univ. of Missouri (1980), and Bates College (1989).
  • High School Outreach Program presenting talks to Maine high schools.
  • Humanist for “Food/Hunger: Greater Self-sufficiency in Maine and in the World” project, funded by the Maine Humanities Council, 1977-78.
  • Member of Social Issue Education Project funded by the Maine Humanities Council to produce movie, “Cut and Run,” a finalist in the American Film Festival. Humanist for project, 1977-81, and co- authored 20-page discussion guide.
  • Humanist for “the Long Search” series on world religions funded by the Maine Humanities Council, 1979-80.
  • Chairperson of the Council of Colleges Committee to Investigate University of Maine Holdings in Corporations Operating in South Africa, 1981-1982.
  • Member of University of Maine Advisory Committee on Women in the Curriculum, 1981-91. Women in the Curriculum Weekly Luncheon Series Committee, 1988-91.
  • Chairperson of University of Maine College of Arts and Sciences Task Force on College Distribution Requirements, 1982-85.
  • Coordinator of Socialist and Marxist Studies Weekly Luncheon Series, 1987-present.
  • Chairperson, Panel on Religion and Political Conflict in South Asia, the Association of Asian Studies, 1988.
    Chairperson, Education Committee, Peace and Justice Center of Eastern Maine, 1988-present.
  • Coordinate monthly film series and discussion, organize conferences, and write articles for
  • News and Views, the monthly publication of the Peace and Justice Center.
  • Contributor to The Maine Progressive, a monthly newspaper.
  • Member of Planning Committee for University of Maine Systemwide Conference on Improving the Quality of Undergraduate Education, 1989.
  • Member of the Faculty Assembly, University of Maine, 1990-91.
  • Member of English Dept. and History Dept. Chair Search Committees.
  • Member of the Arts and Humanities College Planning Committee, 1990-91.
  • Member of Evaluation Comm. of Dean of College of Arts & Humanities, 1994-95; Evaluation Committee of Dean of College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 2000-2001.
  • Coordinator of Dept. of Philosophy Colloquium Series, 1993-95; 2000-2001.
  • Member of Univ. of Maine Cultural Affairs/Distinguished Lecture Series Comm., 1993-97.
  • Member of Howard B. Schonberger Univ. of Maine Peace and Justice Lecture Comm. Coordinator, 1994-present.
  • Member of Elizabeth Morris Peacemaker Award Comm., 1995-present.
  • Member of Associate Dean Search Comm. of College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 1999.
  • Chair of the Minsky Lecture Committee, 1999-2000. Jewish Studies Committee, 2000-present.
  • Member of Peace Studies Curriculum Comm., 1999-present.
  • Consultant to the Jaipur Peace Foundation, Jaipur, India, 2000-present.
  • Faculty Awards Committee, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 2000-2001.
  • Member of University of Maine Strategic Plan Assessment and Implementation Comm. (5-year Strategic Plan), 2001-2002.
  • Member of Advisory Board, Gandhian Perspectives, journal of the Gandhian Institute of Studies, Varnasi, India, 2004-.

Organizations

American Philosophical Ass’n, Society for Asian and Comparative Phil., Radical Phil. Ass’n, North American Society for Social Phil., Concerned Philosophers for Peace, American Academy of Religion, North American Ass’n for the Study of Religion, Ass’n of Asian Studies, Comm. of Concerned Asian Scholars, Union of Radical Political Economics, American Ass’n of University Profs., American Civil Liberties Union, Common Cause, Maine Peace Action Comm., Peace and Justice Center of Eastern Maine, Peace in Central America, Amnesty International, National Education Ass’n, Clergy and Laity Concerned, Witness for Peace, Global Exchange.

 


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Philosophy
5776 The Maples
Orono, ME 04469-5776
Phone: 207-581-3866 | Fax: 207-581-2928
E-mail: Margaret.Forbes@umit.maine.edu
The University of Maine
Orono, Maine 04469
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