Dill Quoted in Press Herald Article About Increase in Tick-Borne Illnesses

August 12th, 2014 11:48 AM

James Dill, a pest management specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, was quoted in a Portland Press Herald article about Maine seeing an increase in tick-bite illnesses other than Lyme disease. Cases of anaplasmosis and babesiosis, which can seriously affect health if undetected, are at or nearing record levels in the state, according to the article. Dill said the good thing about illnesses from ticks is they can be treated with antibiotics. “That’s why, when we have a tick bite, we always tell the individual to contact their physician, especially if people find a tick that is attached and it has started to feed,” he said. He also stressed the importance of having a dedicated tick laboratory at UMaine, which would be funded if voters support Question 2 on the November ballot.

Dill Quoted in AP Article on Berry Growers’ Fruit Fly Battles

August 11th, 2014 3:14 PM

James Dill, a pest management specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, was quoted in an Associated Press article about Northeast berry growers learning how to combat an invasive fruit fly — the tiny spotted-wing drosophila — that wiped out 80 percent of some farms’ late-season fruit two years ago. Growers in Maine, the country’s largest producer of wild blueberries, are spraying and harvesting sooner and planting earlier varieties, the article states. “You take a loss, but the loss is on green berries rather than having to put more pesticides out there,” Dill said. The Portland Press Herald, Yahoo! News and Fox Business carried the AP report.

 

 

WGME Interviews Dill About Tick that can Cause Food Allergy

August 11th, 2014 2:47 PM

WGME (Channel 13) spoke with James Dill, a pest management specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, for a report about studies that show a correlation between lone star tick bites and severe allergies to red meat. Dill said the lone star tick is not established yet in Maine. “We’ve had a few cases of it, most of them seem to appear to be people who have traveled out of state and have come back in,” he said, adding Mainers should still take precautions such as walking in the center of a trail, tucking pants into socks, wearing tick repellent and wearing light clothing so the ticks can be seen easily.

Dill Gives Tips for Dealing with Garden Pests, Diseases on WVII ‘Backyard Gardener’ Segment

August 6th, 2014 3:00 PM

James Dill, a pest management specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, was featured in the latest installment of the “Backyard Gardener” series on WVII (Channel 7). Dill spoke about common garden pests and diseases such as beetles, woodchucks and late blight and offered advice on easy ways to prevent damage. For beetles, Dill suggests plucking them off plants and placing them in a cup of water with liquid soap detergent, or using traps. The ideal solution for dealing with larger wildlife such as woodchucks and groundhogs is to trap and release them, Dill says.

Blueberries Ready for Picking, Yarborough Tells Kennebec Journal

August 5th, 2014 2:36 PM

David Yarborough, a blueberry specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, spoke with the Kennebec Journal about blueberry picking and this year’s harvest. Yarborough said the season started last week in central Maine, with reports of a good crop. Down East barrens will likely be ready for harvesting next week, he added. “The season is running a little later than usual because of the cold spring,” he said. “I think the pickings are pretty excellent.” He recommended picking berries that are fully blue. “When you pick your own, you know it’s fresh,” he said.

WVII Interviews Mowdy, 4-H Members at Bangor State Fair

August 4th, 2014 12:04 PM

Brenda Mowdy, a 4-H community education assistant with University of Maine Cooperative Extension, and 4-H members were featured in a WVII (Channel 7) report on the group’s work at the Bangor State Fair. “In order to be a state fair, you have to have an agricultural emphasis, and we are it,” Mowdy said of the organization that teaches youth about agriculture.

Springuel Talks to BDN About Downeast Fisheries Trail

July 30th, 2014 10:48 AM

Natalie Springuel of Maine Sea Grant spoke with the Bangor Daily News about the Downeast Fisheries Trail, which showcases the state’s fisheries heritage at about 50 sites, including historical societies, fisheries museums and places such as the Cherryfield Cable Pool, a favorite spot for Atlantic salmon fly fishermen, the article states. “A trend in travel is that people want to connect to the real thing on the ground,” said Springuel, the coordinator of the trail. “They want to connect with local people. They want to know how they make a living. They want to know how to lobster, and how to pull up a trap. They want really concrete experiences to understand a place on a deeper level, and then they want to taste it at the end. So yeah, I think the fisheries trail provides a deeper understanding of a place and its people.”

 

AP Advances Aquaculture Meeting Run by Maine Sea Grant

July 29th, 2014 9:14 AM

The Associated Press advanced a July 31 public meeting in Penobscot to provide information on the science of shellfish aquaculture. State officials will also inform the public about the ecological impacts of aquaculture, according to the article. Maine Sea Grant staff are facilitating the meeting and officials with the Maine Department of Marine Resources will lead discussions. WLBZ (Channel 2) and the Maine Public Broadcasting Network carried the AP report

Jemison Gives Tips for Combating Weeds on WVII ‘Backyard Gardener’ Series

July 24th, 2014 2:32 PM

John Jemison, a soil and water quality specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, was featured in the latest installment of the “Backyard Gardener” series on WVII (Channel 7). Jemison spoke about common weeds in the garden and gave advice on how to combat them. He said an efficient way to remove weeds is to use a shovel and get all of the roots, then dispose of the plant in the trash or woods. Jemison added the best thing a gardener can do is stay ahead of the game and not let the weeds go to seed.

UMaine Cooperative Extension Lab Bond Selected as Question 2, WABI Reports

July 24th, 2014 1:39 PM

WABI (Channel 5) reported the order of bond questions for the November ballot was determined by a drawing in Augusta. A bond referring to funds for an animal and plant disease and insect control lab administered by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension was selected as Question 2. The question reads, “Do you favor an $8,000,000 bond issue to support Maine agriculture, facilitate economic growth in natural resources-based industries and monitor human health threats related to ticks, mosquitoes and bedbugs through the creation of an animal and plant disease and insect control laboratory administered by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension Service?”