Archive for the ‘Outreach’ Category

UMaine Student Writes Op-Ed for BDN

Monday, July 21st, 2014

Christopher Burns, a University of Maine student studying English, wrote an opinion piece for the Bangor Daily News, titled “Older adults have addictions, too. Is Maine ready to address the problem?” Lenard Kaye, director of the University of Maine Center on Aging and professor in the UMaine School of Social Work, was quoted in the op-ed. Burns is an intern at the BDN.

UMaine Museum of Art Extends its Lease in Downtown Bangor

Monday, July 21st, 2014

The University of Maine Museum of Art has begun a new 17-year lease with Eastern Maine Development Corporation, maintaining the downtown Bangor location it has occupied in historic Norumbega Hall for more than a decade.

“On behalf of the people of Bangor, I just want to say how excited we are to have the University of Maine Art Museum right in the heart of Bangor for another 17 years,” says Bangor City Council Chairman Ben Sprague, who also is a member of the Museum of Art Advisory Council. ”The museum has been a cornerstone of the revitalization of downtown Bangor, and has brought the arts into the heart of our community for people of all ages and backgrounds to enjoy.”

In May, the University of Maine System Board of Trustees approved the new long-term lease, July 1, 2014–June 30, 2031, and expansion of museum space on the third floor of the building for much-needed fine art storage.

In a letter of support, the Bangor City Council expressed its interest in having the museum remain in downtown Bangor “as a cornerstone of the arts for years to come.”

“The museum is now one of our primary cultural assets and an important aspect of the quality of life for Bangor citizens and those of the surrounding communities,” the council said. “Perhaps most importantly, locating the museum in downtown Bangor has served to strengthen the bonds between the university community and the city of Bangor.”

The museum relocated in December 2002 to take on a new role as a regional fine arts center. The city of Bangor invested $400,000 toward the $955,000 renovation of the first-floor museum space in Norumbega Hall, built in the early 1900s. The additional 1,955 square feet of storage space that will soon be renovated on the third floor of the building will be used for the museum’s growing collection.

The University of Maine Museum of Art collection includes more than 3,600 original works created since 1900, with an emphasis on contemporary art on paper (1945–present). Since 2008, more than 280 works have been added to the permanent collection, most through donation to the museum.

“Over the years, the Museum of Art has contributed to the cultural life of Bangor and to the region,” says George Kinghorn, executive director and curator of the UMaine Museum of Art. “UMMA’s downtown location continues to advance the university’s land-grant mission of outreach and service to Maine citizens by providing quality visual art experiences. It has been most rewarding to play a key role in the revitalization and recent growth of downtown Bangor.”

Contact: Margaret Nagle, 207.581.3745

Spaces Still Available for Summer Marine Science Program, Free Press Reports

Friday, July 18th, 2014

The Free Press reported spots are still available for Dive In, a two-day summer immersion program offered to college-bound high school students who are interested in marine sciences. The program, which will be held Aug. 4–5, will offer hands-on, field-oriented activities at the University of Maine Darling Marine Center in Walpole and the UMaine campus in Orono. It will showcase the university’s marine science faculty and facilities and the academic and research opportunities available to students.      

UMaine Extension Hosts ‘Preserving by the Pint’ Author

Friday, July 18th, 2014

University of Maine Cooperative Extension will host author Marisa McClellan 7–9 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 21, at the UMaine Extension Cumberland County office, 75 Clearwater Drive, Suite 104, Falmouth.

McClellan, author of “Preserving by the Pint: Quick Seasonal Canning for Small Spaces,” will demonstrate urban canning and preserving techniques. “Teaching city dwellers and home cooks how to extend the life of their farmers market purchases throughout the year is my passion,” says McClellan, who learned to can local blueberries, blackberries and apples from her mother.

In addition to canning basics, the book includes recipes divided by season. Spring includes Whole Strawberries in Vanilla Syrup and summer showcases Honey-Sweetened Apricot-Lavender Butter. Fall has Chunky Pear Preserves with Sage and winter wraps up with Quince Slices in Chai Tea Syrup.

Cost is $15 per person. Registration is online. To request disability accommodations, call 207.781.6099 or 800.287.1471 (in Maine).

Volunteers Needed to Collect Beach Profile Data in Scarborough, Current Reports

Thursday, July 17th, 2014

Current reported the University of Maine Cooperative Extension is seeking six to eight volunteers to collect beach profile data for Pine Point in Scarborough in an effort to monitor monthly changes in sand erosion. No prior scientific knowledge is needed. The collected data will be submitted to the Maine Geological Survey and will be used by state geologists who will review and analyze the information to produce reports every two years regarding the effect of climate change on Maine’s beaches, according to the article. The Southern Maine Volunteer Beach Profile Monitoring Program is a project of Maine Sea Grant.

Extension Workshop Focuses on Detecting Internal Parasites

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

University of Maine Cooperative Extension will offer a workshop for farmers on how to detect internal animal parasites from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 9 at J.F. Witter Teaching and Research Center, 160 University Farm Road, Old Town.

Doctors of Veterinary Medicine Jim Weber and Anne Lichtenwalner will demonstrate how to use a microscope to identify common internal parasites of sheep, goats, llamas and alpacas. Cost is $30 per person; registration is required and space is limited to 20.

More information including how to register is online. To request a disability accommodation, call 207.781.6099 or 800.287.1471 (in Maine).

Upward Bound Math Science Students Celebrate 50 Years of National Program

Tuesday, July 15th, 2014

Participants of the Upward Bound Math Science program at the University of Maine are recognizing the 50th anniversary of the national Upward Bound program by contributing to a regional video project.

The video will feature students in Upward Bound programs across New England singing a song dedicated to the program and written by Craig Werth, who works for Upward Bound at the University of New Hampshire and at the New England Educational Opportunity Association (NEOA) Leadership Institute.

The Upward Bound Math Science Program is affiliated with the UMaine College of Education and Human Development and offers a six-week college preparatory program to first-generation college students from eight Maine high schools. The program specifically targets students who are interested in pursuing STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) majors and careers.

This summer, 35 students are attending from Central High School in Corinth, Foxcroft Academy in Dover-Foxcroft, Mattanawcook Academy in Lincoln, Nokomis Regional High School in Newport, Oxford Hills Comprehensive High School in South Paris, Portland High School, Stearns High School in Millinocket, and Schenck High School in East Millinocket. Five participants are attending college in the fall, while the rest are high school juniors and seniors. A total of 66 students participate in programming — college visits, academic advising, field trips, laboratory experiences and leadership opportunities — throughout the school year.

From 1–4 p.m. every Monday, Tuesday and Thursday until July 17, students work on individual research projects and explorations. This year’s projects cover topics ranging from studying the causes and possible treatments for “chemo fog” in chemotherapy patients to research involving lungworm morphology in Maine moose. In addition to the individual projects, students also are working on a group sustainability design project that involves creating a new portable touch tank, as well as collecting pictures and interviews of green space and important landmarks along the Penobscot River as part of the Bay to Baxter Initiative.

The program also includes Watch Groups, a weekly series of guest speakers who meet with the students to expand and challenge their thinking and knowledge.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of Upward Bound, which began in 1964 as part of the Economic Opportunity Act. Talent Search emerged one year later, under the Higher Education Act, and in 1968, Student Support Services was approved by Higher Education Amendments. The three programs were coined TRIO, and more programs have since been created to meet the needs of various student populations.

In an effort to increase students’ performance in mathematics and science courses, the Upward Bound Math Science program began in 1990. UMaine held its first summer session in 1991. The program joined Classic Upward Bound, which came to the UMaine campus in 1966.

More information about the Upward Bound Math Science program is online.

Individual student research project topics are as follows:

Animal pathology/veterinary

  • Lungworm morphology in Maine moose

Archaeology

  • Colonial archaeology

Chemical engineering

  • Bioplastic development

  • Pulp and paper applications: nano- and micro-fibrillated cellulose, and cellulose nanofibers

Genetics

  • Desiccation resistant yeast gene

  • Ethanol and circadian rhythms in zebrafish

  • Genetic lineage of amoeba and dog populations

Mathematics/computer science

  • Evolutionary algorithms for optimization of dynamic systems (such as wind farms)

  • Finding the shortest path across campus

  • Music tone and chord discrimination

  • Population study on gerrymandering and political elections

  • Restricting and opening parameters for robot operation

  • Spatial engineering system for in-flight aircraft recognition

Microbiology/pharmacy

  • Antibacterial effectiveness against E. coli

  • Antimicrobial properties of fighting fish bubble nests

  • Antiseptic actions of on S. epidermidis

  • Handwashing methods and bacterial growth

Physiology/medical

  • Vision acuity in humans

Psychology

  • Causes and treatments for chemo fog

  • Effects of music on mood

  • Effects of music on mood and sustainability

  • Ethanol and circadian rhythms in mice

  • Impacts of eating habits and exercise on self-esteem

  • Learning styles and memory

  • Play behavior in preschool children

Wildlife ecology and environmental science

  • Rainbow smelt age and size compared with otolith (ear bone) growth rings

  • Rainfall levels and wood frog development in local vernal pools

  • Sucker fish size and egg laying capability

  • Water quality in local lakes and streams over time

For more information on the projects or program contact Kelly Ilseman at 617.784.2320 or kelly.ilseman@gmail.com.

Wabanaki Youth Science Program Featured in Bangor Daily News

Monday, July 14th, 2014

The University of Maine’s Wabanaki Youth Science Program was the focus of the Bangor Daily News article, “Summer camp aims to create future environmental leaders in Maine’s tribes.” The program includes a weeklong earth science camp hosted at Schoodic Point for native students from each of Maine’s tribes, as well as the Haudenosaunee tribes in New York. Students in the program learn about science and their cultural heritage simultaneously, according to the article. They receive lessons on forestry, climate change and local plant species, along with basket-weaving and tribal history.

Press Herald Advances Food Preservation Workshops

Monday, July 14th, 2014

The Portland Press Herald reported on July food preservation workshops hosted by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension. The workshops teach techniques for hot water bath and pressure canning, as well as fermentation and drying of herbs, fruits and vegetables. Workshops are scheduled in Lisbon Falls, South Paris and Falmouth. The cost is $15 per person for materials, and registration can be completed online.

UMaine Extension Preps Public to Safely Cook for Crowds

Monday, July 14th, 2014

University of Maine Cooperative Extension is offering a Cooking for Crowds workshop 12–4 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 7, at the UMaine Extension Penobscot County office, 307 Maine Ave., Bangor.

Learn up-to-date methods for safely preparing, handling and serving food for large groups, including at soup kitchens, church functions, food pantries and community fundraisers. The workshop meets Good Shepherd Food Bank food safety training requirements. It covers the following food safety guidelines: planning and purchasing; storing food supplies; preparing food; transporting, storing and serving cooked foods; and handling leftovers.

Cost is $15 per person; scholarships are available. Register online or bring a check to class. For more information, or to request a disability accommodation, call Viña Lindley at 207.342.5971 or 800.287.1426 (in Maine).