Archive for the ‘Natural Sciences, Forestry, and Agriculture’ Category

Zoology Professor Bill Glanz Passes Away

Friday, June 27th, 2014

Bill Glanz, associate professor in the School of Biology and Ecology and cooperating faculty in the Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Conservation Biology, passed away peacefully, surrounded by his family, on June 14, in San Diego. He was 65. Glanz was an outstanding teacher and mentor during his 34 years on the UMaine faculty. He continued to share his passion and expertise in natural history, birds and mammals with students, colleagues and the public up until his departure from campus and Maine this past November. He is remembered as a gifted teacher and scientist, naturalist and valued friend.

Aram Calhoun, Ellie Groden and Jim Bird note that those who would like some way to express condolences to the family and/or contribute to Glanz’s remembrance are welcome to join in the following:

Cards, notes and remembrances are being collected for a packet to send to professor Glanz’s daughter, Liz. She is particularly comforted to hear fun stories about her father, impressions, photos, etc. Deadline for materials is July 11.

Contributions for the Orono Boardwalk in professor Glanz’s name are being collected. Checks should be made payable to: The University of Maine Foundation, bog campaign Glanz in the memo line. This is a description of the gift, compiled by Jim Bird:

Glanz was a strong supporter of the Orono Bog Boardwalk. He helped build the boardwalk and, from 2004-13 during the first weekend in May, he led (or co-led) a very popular morning migratory bird walk in the city forest and on the boardwalk. Glanz also took his students to the boardwalk to teach them about the natural history of a northern peat bog. In honor of professor Glanz, the Orono Bog Boardwalk hopes to collect more than $1,000 in funds to sponsor a new boardwalk section in his name. The new section will be put in next year during Phase 2 of the boardwalk reconstruction. It will be located in an area that Glanz would visit to view the annually returning spruce grouse (Falcipennis canadensis).

All contributions, letters, cards and remembrances may be left with Sue Anderson, 100 Murray Hall, or Catherine Goodine, 210 Nutting Hall.

Glanz’s obituary is online.

BDN Publishes Report on SSI Research on Fish Advisory for Pregnant Women

Friday, June 27th, 2014

The Bangor Daily News reported on two studies conducted by researchers at the University of Maine’s Sustainability Solutions Initiative (SSI) on women’s knowledge of the dangers and health benefits of eating fish while pregnant. The researchers found pregnant women are learning how to safely eat fish after early warnings about the dangers turned many off from eating it entirely. The first study determined that a Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention advisory led women to decrease their consumption of fish, while a follow-up study found a new advisory led to a healthier, more balanced approach to fish consumption. Mario Teisl, an economics professor at UMaine, will discuss study results at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s 2014 National Forum on Contaminants in Fish in September.

Breece Quoted in Press Herald Article on LePage Statement

Friday, June 27th, 2014

James Breece, an economics professor at the University of Maine who is a member of the Bureau of Economic Analysis advisory group, was interviewed for a Portland Press Herald article about a statement issued by Gov. Paul LePage that equated Social Security with welfare, and his following clarification of the statement. LePage criticized the newspaper for making an “erroneous interpretation” of a media release from his office that dealt with a report from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, according to the article. Breece said it’s not unheard of for people to pick apart components of the bureau’s personal income reports for political or other purposes, and a narrow focus offers perspective on how commerce, industry and governments are doing, as reflected in the pay that employees are receiving.

Including other figures compiled by the bureau provides a fuller picture of what “drives the economy,” the article states.

Coghlan’s Work at Trout Camp Mentioned in Morning Sentinel Article

Friday, June 27th, 2014

Steve Coghlan, an associate professor of freshwater fisheries at the University of Maine, was mentioned in a Morning Sentinel article about the Maine Trout Unlimited Trout Camp in Solon. The weeklong camp is sponsored by Trout Unlimited, a national organization that works to conserve coldwater fisheries. Throughout the camp participants fish, learn to tie flies and cast, and study the ecosystem and biology of the Kennebec River. Coghlan is a camp instructor who teaches the students about seine fishing, a method of capturing fish using a large net that usually works best on lakes and ponds or slow-moving water. Coghlan said the camp is mostly about getting students to think about sustainability and the human impact on ecology. “Many popular fisheries, not necessarily this one, but many, are collapsing because they are harvested unsustainably,” Coghlan told campers. “That’s something that you guys coming into this world are going to have to deal with. It’s up to you to think sustainably, to think are we living sustainably and can we sustain ourselves.”

UMaine Researchers Raft Down Penobscot River to Study Changes, BDN Reports

Thursday, June 26th, 2014

The Bangor Daily News covered a Penobscot River rafting trip by University of Maine researchers and students who are noting changes in the waterway by using sonar technology to study the riverbed. “Primarily, we’re interested in the structure of the bottom of the Penobscot River and the changes to that bottom as a result of everything that’s gone on, including human interventions, floods, dam removals and all the other things that have been a part of the history of the river in the last 200 years,” said Sean Smith, an assistant professor at UMaine’s School of Earth and Climate Sciences. He added rivers can’t be managed effectively unless people know how they work and respond to different influences. Gayle Zydlewski, an associate professor at UMaine’s School of Marine Science who studies sturgeon, was also part of the expedition. “Sturgeon would get as far as the Milford Dam, and when the dams went in, they were blocked,” Zydlewski said, adding she wants to know if the fish will use the area and if their population will change now that the dam has been removed.

MPBN Interviews Waring About Local Foods Study

Thursday, June 26th, 2014

The Maine Public Broadcasting Network spoke with Timothy Waring, an assistant professor of social-ecological systems modeling at the University of Maine, about a consumer survey on local foods. The survey was conducted by Waring and other researchers at the Maine Food Strategy. The survey found Mainers are going out of their way to buy more local produce and seafood. More than a third of people surveyed said they purchased up to a quarter of their food from local sources. Ninety percent said that freshness, flavor and nutrition were their main reasons for seeking out locally raised food. “They’re also eager to do it to support local farmers, so people are doing it out of some sense of commitment to the people who are raising the food,” Waring said.

UMaine Climate Change Research Cited in BDN Editorial

Thursday, June 26th, 2014

A Bangor Daily News editorial titled “Keeping up with Maine’s changing climate” cited several University of Maine initiatives that aim to mitigate the effects of extreme weather. The editorial mentioned the Maine Futures Community Mapper, an online tool developed by Maine’s Sustainability Solutions Initiative (SSI) that allows people to see the best locations for development, conservation, agriculture or forestry in Maine, and then shows what future landscapes would look like under different scenarios. Research being conducted by SSI with coastal communities to update stormwater plans and identify problem culverts, as well as a bill sponsored by Rep. Mick Devin, a researcher and shellfish hatchery manager at UMaine’s Darling Marine Center, that will establish a commission to study ocean acidification and how it affects the harvest of shellfish were also mentioned. UMaine’s Climate Change Institute was cited as “one organization with the expertise to guide community leaders in their climate adaptation and sustainability plans.” The CCI will host a workshop at the Wells Conference Center on Oct. 23 to help Maine communities with climate change planning, the editorial states.

Maine Edge Publishes Report on Boss’ Ocean Research

Thursday, June 26th, 2014

The Maine Edge published an article about research to be conducted by University of Maine professor of oceanography Emmanuel Boss and UMaine master’s graduate Thomas Leeuw. This summer, the pair will board the sailboat Tara to collect data and conduct research on ocean color, composition and pigments of surface particles in the Mediterranean Sea. In addition to collaborating with international scientists, they’ll talk with schoolchildren about the ocean.

Media Report on Gabe’s Updated Waterfront Concerts Study

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014

The Bangor Daily News and WLBZ (Channel 2) reported on an updated study conducted by University of Maine economist Todd Gabe on the economic impact of Bangor’s Waterfront Concerts series. Gabe first released the study in early 2013, which estimated the first three years of the concert series brought more than $30 million into the local economy. Gabe recently released an update to include data from the 2013 season, which surpassed each previous year in terms of attendance, number of performances, impact on local businesses and people’s willingness to travel long distances to see a show, according to the article. The 19 shows in 2013 had a total economic impact of nearly $17.5 million — more than half the total of the first three years combined, according to the study. Gabe’s journal article on the study is scheduled to be published in the Review of Regional Studies. Mainebiz also cited the BDN report. 

Gabe’s Economic Impact Study for Downeast LNG Cited in Press Herald Article

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014

An economic impact study by University of Maine economist Todd Gabe was cited in a Portland Press Herald article about Downeast LNG altering plans for a proposed liquefied natural gas import terminal in Washington County. Downeast LNG commissioned Gabe to conduct the study. Gabe found the new project would create 2,350 jobs and $375 million in labor income during its three-year construction period. He also estimated the terminal would support 337 jobs in the state and have an annual economic impact of $68 million.