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Fuller Talks to Press Herald About Growing Garlic in Maine

David Fuller, an agricultural and non-timber forest products professional with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, was interviewed by the Portland Press Herald for an article about the increase of garlic in Maine gardens. According to UMaine Extension, about 100 farmers around the state grow garlic and that number is on the rise, Fuller said. He added Mainers are now growing about 70 different varieties. Fuller also spoke about the Maine Garlic Project, a research study he started in 2010 with crops specialist Steven Johnson. The study, which concluded last year, was intended to encourage more garlic production in the state among both farmers and home gardeners. “You start talking garlic with some people, and they just don’t stop,” Fuller said of the passionate farmers he has met.

Livingston Quoted in BDN Article on Maine Forest-Products Industry

Bill Livingston, an associate professor of forest resources at the University of Maine, was quoted in a Bangor Daily News article titled, “‘We need laborers’: Maine forest-products industry urging teachers to steer students its way.” The article focused on a field trip to Jackman taken by 25 teachers as part of a four-day professional development workshop organized by the Maine TREE Foundation and Project Learning Tree. The goal of the workshop is to enhance educators’ level of knowledge and perceptions of the forest-products industry so they can teach their students about the industry and present it as a viable career option, the article states. “They’re not out there trying to promote a specific use of the forest. They’re out there to show the range of the uses of the forest and help teachers understand that better,” Livingston said of the program organizers. The Sun Journal also carried the BDN report.

Maine Policy Review Essay Focus of MPBN Report

John Piotti, executive director of the Maine Farmland Trust, was interviewed by the Maine Public Broadcasting Network about his Maine Policy Review article, “Farming’s Future Depends on Continued Innovation.”

Maine Policy Review Piece Topic of MPBN Interview

John Dorrer, a consultant with Georgetown University’s Center on Education in the Workplace, spoke with the Maine Public Broadcasting Network for a report based on his Maine Policy Review article, “Do we have the workforce skills for Maine’s innovation economy?”

BDN Covers Yarborough’s Blueberry Industry Talk

The Bangor Daily News reported on a meeting at the University of Maine Cooperative Extension’s Blueberry Hill Farm in Jonesboro. About 150 growers, processors, vendors and suppliers gathered at the wild blueberry research facility to listen to David Yarborough, a blueberry specialist for UMaine Extension, discuss this year’s crop and the latest research projects. “Although we had a late start to the season, we’ve had plenty of rainfall — ample rainfall, really — and wild blueberries like cool and wet conditions,” Yarborough said. “So growing conditions have been fairly optimal.” Yarborough said Maine’s crop usually averages about 90 million pounds, and this season he expects the yield to be in the range of 90–95 million pounds.

UMaine Economic Impact Studies Cited in WLBZ Craft Brewery Report

A WLBZ (Channel 2) report on the economic impact of Maine craft breweries on local communities cited several University of Maine studies. The report states that according to UMaine economic impact studies, Maine’s wild blueberry harvest was worth about $69 million in 2012, and the lobster catch was worth about $340 million. A study conducted by UMaine and the Maine Brewers’ Guild found the state’s craft brewing industry has an economic impact of nearly $200 million and is growing. The study looked at Maine’s 35 craft breweries in 2013. Now there are 55 breweries, with three more scheduled to open this year, according to the report.

Segal Talks with MPBN About History of Innovation in Maine

Howard Segal, a University of Maine history professor, spoke with the Maine Public Broadcasting Network for Part 2 of its “Innovation in the Maine Economy” series. Segal spoke about what innovation in Maine looked like in the 19th century, and how the state’s economy was more complex at that time than people may think. Segal also wrote an essay on the topic, titled “Economic and Technological Innovation in Maine before the Twentieth Century: Complex, Uneven, but Pervasive and Important,” which appears in the latest Maine Policy Review.

Working Waterfront, Phys.org Publish Report on Grad Student’s Sea Urchin Research

The Working Waterfront and Phys.org carried a report on sea urchin research being conducted by University of Maine marine bioresources graduate student Ung Wei Kenn. His research focuses on enhancing green sea urchin egg production to aid Maine’s depressed urchin market. Ung hopes to increase the egg or roe yield of farm-raised green sea urchins through high-quality feed, a process known as bulking. “I was always interested in the vertical integration of aquaculture and seafood processing,” says Ung. “I am also passionate about seafood that is popular in Asia. This topic is a blend of all that.”

Summer Technology Camp Held at UMaine Noted in BDN, Weekly Articles

A monthlong technology camp offered in July at the the University of Maine’s Innovative Media Research and Commercialization Center by the new business High Touch Courses was mentioned in a Bangor Daily News article. The curriculum over four weeks of courses uses video game development as a way to attract young people to subjects in Web design and development, 3-D art and graphic design, game development and hardware architecture, according to the article. “It’s about getting them interested in programming at a younger age,” said entrepreneur Elizabeth Chabe, who last fall founded High Touch Group and its sister company, High Touch Courses. The Weekly also carried a story on the camp.

Handley, Moran Interviewed for MPBN Report on Climate Change, Agriculture

David Handley, a University of Maine Cooperative Extension specialist of vegetables and small fruits at UMaine’s Highmoor Farm in Monmouth, and Renae Moran, a tree fruit specialist with UMaine Extension, were interviewed for a Maine Public Broadcasting Network report titled “Climate change presents Maine farmers with new challenges.” Handley spoke about testing new crops for the region, such as grapes, as the climate changes. Moran, who is currently testing several varieties of peaches, plums and cherries, warns climate change is unpredictable and more research is needed before any farmer is recommended to make a big investment in traditionally warmer weather fruits.


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UMaine News
The University of Maine
Orono, Maine 04469
207.581.1110
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