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Zoology Professor Bill Glanz Passes Away

Bill Glanz, associate professor in the School of Biology and Ecology and cooperating faculty in the Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Conservation Biology, passed away peacefully, surrounded by his family, on June 14, in San Diego. He was 65. Glanz was an outstanding teacher and mentor during his 34 years on the UMaine faculty. He continued to share his passion and expertise in natural history, birds and mammals with students, colleagues and the public up until his departure from campus and Maine this past November. He is remembered as a gifted teacher and scientist, naturalist and valued friend.

Aram Calhoun, Ellie Groden and Jim Bird note that those who would like some way to express condolences to the family and/or contribute to Glanz’s remembrance are welcome to join in the following:

Cards, notes and remembrances are being collected for a packet to send to professor Glanz’s daughter, Liz. She is particularly comforted to hear fun stories about her father, impressions, photos, etc. Deadline for materials is July 11.

Contributions for the Orono Boardwalk in professor Glanz’s name are being collected. Checks should be made payable to: The University of Maine Foundation, bog campaign Glanz in the memo line. This is a description of the gift, compiled by Jim Bird:

Glanz was a strong supporter of the Orono Bog Boardwalk. He helped build the boardwalk and, from 2004-13 during the first weekend in May, he led (or co-led) a very popular morning migratory bird walk in the city forest and on the boardwalk. Glanz also took his students to the boardwalk to teach them about the natural history of a northern peat bog. In honor of professor Glanz, the Orono Bog Boardwalk hopes to collect more than $1,000 in funds to sponsor a new boardwalk section in his name. The new section will be put in next year during Phase 2 of the boardwalk reconstruction. It will be located in an area that Glanz would visit to view the annually returning spruce grouse (Falcipennis canadensis).

All contributions, letters, cards and remembrances may be left with Sue Anderson, 100 Murray Hall, or Catherine Goodine, 210 Nutting Hall.

Glanz’s obituary is online.

Maine Sea Grant Updates Guide to Managing Hurricane Hazards

Hurricane hazards come in many forms, including storm surge, heavy rainfall, flooding, high winds and rip currents. All of these can affect people who live on shorefront land. To help property owners take steps now to make their homes more resilient and less damage-prone over the long run, Maine Sea Grant has updated the Maine Property Owner’s Guide to Managing Flooding, Erosion & Other Coastal Hazards.

The online resource contains detailed information on navigating state and federal regulatory and permitting processes associated with actions such as elevating a house, moving a house back away from the water, restoring dunes, creating buffers and stabilizing coastal bluffs. Normandeau Associates Environmental Consultants worked in partnership with Sea Grant and University of Maine Cooperative Extension to make this new information available. Now, not only can coastal property owners learn more about the hazards they face and what can be done to protect their property, they also can access step-by-step recommendations and permitting guidance.

Examples of property owners who have taken some of these steps are highlighted in case studies from across southern Maine. Information about a tour of resilient properties to be offered in September will be online.

Property owners in Maine’s coastal communities are encouraged to review this updated guidance document as soon as possible. By taking action now to prevent hurricane damage, public and private property owners can greatly reduce their risk of damage and avoid significant costs and delays associated with repairs and restoration.

LaRocque Named Associate Provost for DLL

Monique LaRocque, executive director of Division of Professional and Continuing Education at the University of Southern Maine, has been named University of Maine associate provost for the Division of Lifelong Learning (DLL), effective July 1.

LaRocque replaces Lucille Zeph, who resigned as associate provost and DLL dean to allow her to focus solely on her duties as director of the Center for Community Inclusion and Disability Studies at UMaine. For the past three years, Zeph had held both positions.

“Monique has a unique set of skills and experiences that match extremely well with UMaine’s needs at this time,” says Jeffrey Hecker, executive vice president for academic affairs and provost. “Online courses, certificates and degree programs are growing pieces of the UMaine academic portfolio. Monique will lead our efforts to grow this portfolio intelligently, ensuring that our offerings match the needs of Maine and beyond, and are delivered with the highest quality.”

At UMaine, LaRocque will help develop online program offerings, particularly at the graduate level, and establish a team to support faculty developing online courses using state-of-the-art pedagogies. LaRocque also will lead the growth of UMaine’s Summer University.

LaRocque joined USM in 2004 as director of summer and winter session, and international programming. She served as associate dean of academic outreach from 2006–10, then as executive director of the Division of Professional and Continuing Education. Prior to joining USM, LaRocque served as assistant dean of academic affairs and director of winter term at DePauw University from 2001–04. She also has held positions at Butler University and Westbrook College.

LaRocque holds a Ph.D. and a master’s degree in comparative literature from Indiana University, and a second master’s in French from Middlebury College School in Paris, France.

Maine Student Places First at National History Day Competition

Noah Binette of Berwick, Maine, won first place in the individual exhibit category at the National History Day Competition in June. Binette was one of 47 students representing Maine at the contest held at the University of Maryland in College Park.

The rising sophomore at Noble High School, won the senior individual exhibit division for his presentation on Malaga Island. In April, Binette also won at Maine’s National History Day competition held at the University of Maine.

A new partnership between UMaine and the Margaret Chase Smith Library, with support from the Maine Humanities Council and the Maine Historical Society, brought the event for students in grades 6–12 to the UMaine campus for the first time since the national program began in 1980.

“Our first year of coordinating National History Day in Maine has been successful for many reasons, and Binette’s win demonstrates the strides we have made in organizing this program,” said John Taylor, Maine National History Day State Coordinator and museum assistant at the Margaret Chase Smith Library. “We look forward to building upon this success as we prepare for the 2015 season.”

UMaine Extension Publishes Bulletin on Raising Rabbits for Meat

University of Maine Cooperative Extension has released a bulletin to inform people interested in becoming backyard producers of meat rabbits.

Gary Anderson, a UMaine Extension animal and bio-sciences specialist, authored Backyard Production of Meat Rabbits in Maine. Topics in the 15-page bulletin include the Maine environment, breeds and selection, reproduction, health management, predator control, market outlets and promotions, dressing out a rabbit fryer and recipes.

The popularity of raising domestic meat rabbits is growing in Maine, Anderson says, adding that benefits include nutritious food at a relatively low cost, potential for extra income and an educational experience for the family.

More information, bulletin copies for $1.50 each and free downloads are available from the UMaine Extension Publication Catalog or by contacting the UMaine Extension Publications Office at 207.581.3792 or extension.orders@maine.edu.

Learn Yardscaping Basics at Cooperative Extension Workshop

University of Maine Cooperative Extension Master Gardener Volunteers will offer a hands-on yardscaping workshop, including how to incorporate native Maine plants in the yard, 2–4 p.m. Sunday, July 20, at Wells Reserve, 342 Laudholm Farm Road, Wells.

UMaine Extension Master Gardener Volunteers Allan Amioka and Ginger Laurits will cover basics of yardscaping — an ornamental gardening strategy that minimizes or eliminates the use of pesticides and fertilizers, thereby reducing harmful downstream effects. Learn about choosing the right place with the right plants that have low-pest profiles and are well adapted to the area. There also will be a tour of the Native Plant Garden at Wells Reserve, as well as a segment on identifying invasive species.

The $7 workshop fee ($5 for Laudholm Trust members) is payable at the event. Participants will meet at the All Seasons Garden behind the lab/science building, and should dress for the outdoors and be prepared for hands-on learning.

To preregister, call UMaine Extension in York County at 207.324.2814 or email rebecca.gowdy@maine.edu. For more information or to request a disability accommodation, call Frank Wertheim at 207.324.2814 or 800.287.1535 (in state).

The program is part of the Four Season Gardening series brought to the Wells Reserve at Laudholm by UMaine Extension’s York County Master Gardener Volunteers. The next workshop — Hoop Bending and Extending the Gardening Season in Maine — is scheduled for Wednesday, Aug. 13.

Learn to Cook for Crowds

University of Maine Cooperative Extension is offering a Cooking for Crowds workshop 1–5 p.m. Monday, July 7, at the UMaine Extension Somerset County office, 7 County Drive, Skowhegan.

Learn up-to-date methods for safely preparing, handling and serving food for large groups, including at soup kitchens, church functions, food pantries and community fundraisers. The class meets the Good Shepherd Food Bank food safety training requirements. The workshop covers the following food safety guidelines: planning and purchasing; storing food supplies; preparing food; transporting, storing and serving cooked foods; and handling leftovers. Cost is $15 per person; scholarships are available.

For more information, to register or to request a disability accommodation, call Crystal Hamilton at 207.622.7546 or 800.287.1481 (in Maine). Details about future workshops are online.

UMaine Student Produces Science Storytelling Event

University of Maine marine biology graduate student Skylar Bayer is co-producing a live science storytelling event at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, July 17, at the Frontier in Brunswick.

Five scientists, including UMaine alums Jennifer McHenry and Ryan Elizabeth Cope, will share true experiences of being caught “On the Hook” for The Story Collider, which produces live shows and podcasts where people tell stories about how science has affected their lives “on a personal and emotional level.”

Bayer was featured in a February podcast for The Story Collider titled “Phoning Home from Alvin.” In the 15-minute podcast, the Massachusetts native shares a touching and humorous experience about facing her fears and taking part in a deep-ocean dive in a submersible named Alvin.

Bayer has dreamed of being a marine scientist since she was 8; she is pursuing her Ph.D. in marine reproductive ecology at the Darling Marine Center in Walpole. Bayer also manages, edits and writes the blog, Strictlyfishwrap. She might be better known as “the lonely lady scientist” from a 2013 feature titled “The Enemy Within” on “The Colbert Report.” Bayer is co-producing the storytelling event with Ari Daniel, who has reported for NPR’s “Morning Edition,” “All Things Considered” and “Weekend Edition.” Daniel earned a Ph.D. in biological oceanography at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Scheduled storytellers also include Jeffrey M. Schell, associate professor of oceanography with Sea Education Association; Meredith White, postdoctoral researcher at Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences; and Nick Bennett, an environmental advocate. Tickets may be purchased online at eventbrite.com.  The theater is at 14 Maine St., Mill 3 at Fort Andross, in Brunswick.

UMaine Hosts 70 High School Students for Stormwater Research Institute

About 70 high school students and teachers from Portland, Bangor, Auburn and local Native American communities will gather at the University of Maine for a five-day UMaine Stormwater Management Research Team (SMART) Institute.

UMaine scientists and students, city water planners, and representatives from the Maine Department of Environmental Protection, and businesses including Woodard & Curran and IDEXX will also take part in the institute that runs from Monday, June 23 through Friday, June 27.

The SMART Institute aims to engage a diverse group of students and teachers in training for the implementation of science, technology engineering and mathematics (STEM) and Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) core values in their schools while addressing an important environmental issue.

The institute is supported by a more than $735,000 grant awarded by the National Science Foundation’s Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) to empower female and minority high school students, their teachers and communities to create innovative solutions to the environmental problems related to stormwater management.

Throughout the conference, students will take part in hands-on projects led by STEM professionals in areas such as engineering design, science, computer modeling and information technology to monitor and map water quality. Participants will tour UMaine labs and stormwater areas on campus, hear from guest speakers, and learn how to use wireless sensors to test water, as well as collect, enter and analyze data.

The institute will cap off with a field trip to the Arctic Brook watershed area in Bangor where students will install the wireless sensors they built and collect data as citizen scientists. An awards ceremony will be held on campus before students depart.

BioMediaLab the Focus of Upcoming Promotional Video

The University of Maine BioMediaLab will be spotlighted in a promotional video filmed by one of the lab’s software providers.

The BioMediaLab, an advanced technology-centric science new media lab in Murray Hall, recently started using Wowza, a versatile media streaming server that efficiently allows students access to online course video, prompting Wowza Media Systems to film a promotional video that spotlights the lab’s work.

“Brian Ellis, Wowza’s customer success manager, contacted me about our purchase. He mentioned he received a B.S. in mechanical engineering in 2003 from UMaine and was interested in what the lab was doing with their software,” says BioMediaLab Director Ron Kozlowski. “(The marketing film) is a mutual thing; we’re both promoting each other.”

A cutting-edge technology environment, the BioMediaLab’s main focus is Synapse, a content learning management system. UMaine science faculty use the system to create a collaborative learning environment. Media such as videos, audio, slide shows, PDFs and other course material can be added to its courses. Wowza and Synapse allow easier streaming of video to numerous devices, no matter the file format.

Staffed by three full-time professionals, the lab services thousands of first- and second-year UMaine students across 24 courses.

“The purpose of the lab is to enhance research through technology,” says Kozlowski, a Synapse engineer and the BioMediaLab director for 10 years.


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UMaine News
The University of Maine
Orono, Maine 04469
207.581.1110
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