Archive for the ‘Blue Sky in the News’ Category

WLBZ Interviews President Hunter About System Budget

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014

WLBZ (Channel 2) spoke with University of Maine President Susan Hunter for a report on University of Maine System trustees approving a five-year plan aimed at closing the system’s budget deficit. “Our goal is to really make education accessible, affordable — certainly very high quality — and have it relevant and have people in Maine really want to get educated, because they see it as the best way forward,” Hunter said.

Khalil, Mason Awarded Research Funds from Maine Cancer Foundation, AP Reports

Monday, July 21st, 2014

The Associated Press reported Andre Khalil, an associate professor of mathematics at the University of Maine, and Michael Mason, an associate professor of chemical and biological engineering at UMaine, were among seven researchers to receive funds from the Maine Cancer Foundation to study the origins and potential cures for cancer. The foundation awarded a total of $839,000. Khalil received nearly $180,000 to study breast cancer, and Mason was awarded nearly $220,000 to research leukemia. WABI (Channel 5), WLBZ (Channel 2) and The Republic carried the AP report. The Maine Cancer Foundation also published research profiles on Mason and Khalil.

Bridge Year Program Focus of BDN Article

Monday, July 21st, 2014

The Bangor Daily News published an article on the Bridge Year Program, an educational collaborative involving the University of Maine that aims to increase the number of Maine students who earn a college degree by giving them access to college classes during their junior and senior years in high school. The program began in 2012 and was piloted at Hermon High School. Bangor High School was added to the program last year and six more schools will be added next year.

Phys.org Carries Report on NASA, UMaine Project on Phytoplankton, Carbon Cycling

Friday, July 18th, 2014

Phys.org published a University of Maine report about UMaine oceanographer Ivona Cetinic participating in a NASA project that brings together marine and atmospheric scientists to tackle optical issues associated with satellite observations of phytoplankton. The goal is to better understand marine ecology and phytoplankton’s major role in the global cycling of atmospheric carbon between the ocean and the atmosphere. “Teams involved in this project are working together to develop next-generation tools that will change forever how we study oceans,” says Cetinic, a research associate at UMaine’s Darling Marine Center.

President Hunter Interview Posted on BDN Blog

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

University of Maine President Susan Hunter was interviewed for a post on the Bangor Daily News blog “Fill the Steins.” In the article, titled “Getting to know UMaine’s new president, Dr. Susan Hunter,” she speaks about her almost 30-year career at the university, the Blue Sky Plan, her vision for the future, and some of her favorite spots on campus and in Orono.

Wabanaki Youth Science Program Featured in Bangor Daily News

Monday, July 14th, 2014

The University of Maine’s Wabanaki Youth Science Program was the focus of the Bangor Daily News article, “Summer camp aims to create future environmental leaders in Maine’s tribes.” The program includes a weeklong earth science camp hosted at Schoodic Point for native students from each of Maine’s tribes, as well as the Haudenosaunee tribes in New York. Students in the program learn about science and their cultural heritage simultaneously, according to the article. They receive lessons on forestry, climate change and local plant species, along with basket-weaving and tribal history.

Segal Talks with MPBN About History of Innovation in Maine

Monday, July 14th, 2014

Howard Segal, a University of Maine history professor, spoke with the Maine Public Broadcasting Network for Part 2 of its “Innovation in the Maine Economy” series. Segal spoke about what innovation in Maine looked like in the 19th century, and how the state’s economy was more complex at that time than people may think. Segal also wrote an essay on the topic, titled “Economic and Technological Innovation in Maine before the Twentieth Century: Complex, Uneven, but Pervasive and Important,” which appears in the latest Maine Policy Review.

Working Waterfront, Phys.org Publish Report on Grad Student’s Sea Urchin Research

Friday, July 11th, 2014

The Working Waterfront and Phys.org carried a report on sea urchin research being conducted by University of Maine marine bioresources graduate student Ung Wei Kenn. His research focuses on enhancing green sea urchin egg production to aid Maine’s depressed urchin market. Ung hopes to increase the egg or roe yield of farm-raised green sea urchins through high-quality feed, a process known as bulking. “I was always interested in the vertical integration of aquaculture and seafood processing,” says Ung. “I am also passionate about seafood that is popular in Asia. This topic is a blend of all that.”

Terrell House Community Garden Focus of Weekly Article

Friday, July 11th, 2014

The Weekly published the article “UMaine community garden grows sustainability,” about the community garden at the University of Maine’s Terrell House Permaculture Living and Learning Center. The project began as a small garden shared by the Terrell House and its neighbors. Starting this year, house residents have initiated the first phase of a larger community garden with plots available for individuals and groups interested in practicing sustainable agriculture, the article states. “We want the garden to become a hub for sustainability on campus,” said Dee Clark, Terrell House resident and finance and records coordinator. The article cited the garden as one part of a growing sustainability movement on campus. UMaine Greens, a student-run greenhouse project, and the Black Bear Food Guild, a student-run community-supported agriculture (CSA) program, also were mentioned.

Summer Technology Camp Held at UMaine Noted in BDN, Weekly Articles

Friday, July 11th, 2014

A monthlong technology camp offered in July at the the University of Maine’s Innovative Media Research and Commercialization Center by the new business High Touch Courses was mentioned in a Bangor Daily News article. The curriculum over four weeks of courses uses video game development as a way to attract young people to subjects in Web design and development, 3-D art and graphic design, game development and hardware architecture, according to the article. “It’s about getting them interested in programming at a younger age,” said entrepreneur Elizabeth Chabe, who last fall founded High Touch Group and its sister company, High Touch Courses. The Weekly also carried a story on the camp.