Archive for the ‘Blue Sky in the News’ Category

Press Herald Reports on Gosse’s Study on Chemical in Antibacterial Products

Friday, August 1st, 2014

The Portland Press Herald interviewed Julie Gosse, an assistant professor of molecular and biomedical sciences at the University of Maine, about her research on how a synthetic antimicrobial common in soaps and deodorants inhibits cells that sometimes fight cancer. Gosse told the Press Herald the chemical triclosan is added to many over-the-counter products advertised as antibacterial, such as soaps, toothpaste, body washes and facial cleansers. The chemical also is used in fabrics and plastics to help prevent mold growth, and has become so common that it’s now in the water supply. “This is not a chemical people need to have every day,” Gosse said. The National Institutes of Health awarded Gosse more than $420,000 for the three-year project. “We’re not going to be able to resolve the public health question, but we will be one piece of the puzzle,” she added.

Jung Speaks with BDN About International Student Recruitment

Monday, July 28th, 2014

Jimmy Jung, vice president for enrollment management at the University of Maine, was interviewed for a Bangor Daily News article about Study Group, a company that recruits international students, and its work with two campuses in the University of Maine System. According to the article, the company signed a contract with the system with a goal of recruiting 50 students to UMaine. Jung said even though the goal hasn’t been met yet, the university has been pleased with its partnership with Study Group. “When we first signed the contract, we’d really missed that recruitment cycle already,” said Jung, adding that close to 40 is “not a bad number.” He said he expects it will take UMaine five to 10 years to establish all the contacts necessary to get a robust international student program going, the article states.

WABI Covers Bridge Year Program Students’ UMaine Visit

Thursday, July 24th, 2014

WABI (Channel 5) reported on a recent trip of Houlton High School students to the University of Maine. The students are participants in the Bridge Year Program, an educational collaborative involving UMaine that aims to increase the number of Maine students who earn a college degree by giving them access to college classes during their junior and senior years in high school. Bridge Year Program students can earn enough credits during their last two high school years to start their college careers as sophomores, according to the report. During the trip, the students learned about UMaine engineering programs.

WLBZ Interviews President Hunter About System Budget

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014

WLBZ (Channel 2) spoke with University of Maine President Susan Hunter for a report on University of Maine System trustees approving a five-year plan aimed at closing the system’s budget deficit. “Our goal is to really make education accessible, affordable — certainly very high quality — and have it relevant and have people in Maine really want to get educated, because they see it as the best way forward,” Hunter said.

Khalil, Mason Awarded Research Funds from Maine Cancer Foundation, AP Reports

Monday, July 21st, 2014

The Associated Press reported Andre Khalil, an associate professor of mathematics at the University of Maine, and Michael Mason, an associate professor of chemical and biological engineering at UMaine, were among seven researchers to receive funds from the Maine Cancer Foundation to study the origins and potential cures for cancer. The foundation awarded a total of $839,000. Khalil received nearly $180,000 to study breast cancer, and Mason was awarded nearly $220,000 to research leukemia. WABI (Channel 5), WLBZ (Channel 2) and The Republic carried the AP report. The Maine Cancer Foundation also published research profiles on Mason and Khalil.

Bridge Year Program Focus of BDN Article

Monday, July 21st, 2014

The Bangor Daily News published an article on the Bridge Year Program, an educational collaborative involving the University of Maine that aims to increase the number of Maine students who earn a college degree by giving them access to college classes during their junior and senior years in high school. The program began in 2012 and was piloted at Hermon High School. Bangor High School was added to the program last year and six more schools will be added next year.

Phys.org Carries Report on NASA, UMaine Project on Phytoplankton, Carbon Cycling

Friday, July 18th, 2014

Phys.org published a University of Maine report about UMaine oceanographer Ivona Cetinic participating in a NASA project that brings together marine and atmospheric scientists to tackle optical issues associated with satellite observations of phytoplankton. The goal is to better understand marine ecology and phytoplankton’s major role in the global cycling of atmospheric carbon between the ocean and the atmosphere. “Teams involved in this project are working together to develop next-generation tools that will change forever how we study oceans,” says Cetinic, a research associate at UMaine’s Darling Marine Center.

President Hunter Interview Posted on BDN Blog

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

University of Maine President Susan Hunter was interviewed for a post on the Bangor Daily News blog “Fill the Steins.” In the article, titled “Getting to know UMaine’s new president, Dr. Susan Hunter,” she speaks about her almost 30-year career at the university, the Blue Sky Plan, her vision for the future, and some of her favorite spots on campus and in Orono.

Wabanaki Youth Science Program Featured in Bangor Daily News

Monday, July 14th, 2014

The University of Maine’s Wabanaki Youth Science Program was the focus of the Bangor Daily News article, “Summer camp aims to create future environmental leaders in Maine’s tribes.” The program includes a weeklong earth science camp hosted at Schoodic Point for native students from each of Maine’s tribes, as well as the Haudenosaunee tribes in New York. Students in the program learn about science and their cultural heritage simultaneously, according to the article. They receive lessons on forestry, climate change and local plant species, along with basket-weaving and tribal history.

Segal Talks with MPBN About History of Innovation in Maine

Monday, July 14th, 2014

Howard Segal, a University of Maine history professor, spoke with the Maine Public Broadcasting Network for Part 2 of its “Innovation in the Maine Economy” series. Segal spoke about what innovation in Maine looked like in the 19th century, and how the state’s economy was more complex at that time than people may think. Segal also wrote an essay on the topic, titled “Economic and Technological Innovation in Maine before the Twentieth Century: Complex, Uneven, but Pervasive and Important,” which appears in the latest Maine Policy Review.