Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Strawberry IPM Newsletter No. 6 – July 18, 2014

Friday, July 18th, 2014

strawberries

Please visit the Highmoor Farm website for the University of Maine Strawberry Integrated Pest Management Newsletter No. 6, July 16, 2014, “Renovation and Weed Management Issue.”

Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 4 – July 18, 2014

Friday, July 18th, 2014

sweet corn

Please visit the Highmoor Farm website for the Universithy of Maine Sweet Corn Integrated Pest Management Newsletter No. 4, July 18, 2014, “Corn Earworm Counts Climbing.”

BDN Covers Yarborough’s Blueberry Industry Talk

Thursday, July 17th, 2014

The Bangor Daily News reported on a meeting at the University of Maine Cooperative Extension’s Blueberry Hill Farm in Jonesboro. About 150 growers, processors, vendors and suppliers gathered at the wild blueberry research facility to listen to David Yarborough, a blueberry specialist for UMaine Extension, discuss this year’s crop and the latest research projects. “Although we had a late start to the season, we’ve had plenty of rainfall — ample rainfall, really — and wild blueberries like cool and wet conditions,” Yarborough said. “So growing conditions have been fairly optimal.” Yarborough said Maine’s crop usually averages about 90 million pounds, and this season he expects the yield to be in the range of 90–95 million pounds.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Update: 7/17/2014

Thursday, July 17th, 2014
Male Spotted Wing Drosophila

Male Spotted Wing Drosophila, photo by Griffin Dill

Spotted wing drosophila captures are becoming more widespread this week, although numbers are still quite low.

Please visit the Highmoor Farm website for the July 17, 2014 Spotted Wing Drosophila Update, where you can subscribe to updates.

Made in Maine: This Little Piggy

Thursday, July 17th, 2014

two young pigs; photo by Edwin RemsbergDonald E Hoenig, VMD, writes about the issue of swine welfare in his most recent post for Made in Maine: Thoughts on Food, Animals and Agriculture, a blog for Maine farmers. Gestation crates have been banned in Maine since Jan. 1, 2011, but this housing method is widely used elsewhere. After sows are bred, they are often placed in gestation crates for the duration of their pregnancy. These crates allow the sows to stand up and lie down freely, but do not enable them to turn around. Do you think sows should be able to stand up, lie down, and turn around freely? Do you buy your food based on a company’s adoption of certain humane or ethical principles? Are you willing to pay extra for this food? Read more in Made in Maine: Thoughts on Food, Animals and Agriculture, then submit your questions and comments to dochoenigvmd78@gmail.com. Answers to selected questions will appear in future blog posts.

Dr. Hoenig retired as the Maine State Veterinarian in 2012 and, after completing a year-long Congressional Fellowship in Sen. Susan Collins’ office in Washington DC last year, in January 2014 he started working as a part-time Extension Veterinarian for University of Maine Cooperative Extension.

MPBN Interviews Redmond for Report on Seaweed Beer

Thursday, July 17th, 2014

Sarah Redmond, a Maine Sea Grant aquaculture specialist at the University of Maine’s Center for Cooperative Aquaculture Research, was interviewed for a Maine Public Broadcasting Network report about beer made with seaweed at the Marshall Wharf Brewing Co. in Belfast, Maine. David Carlson, the company’s owner, has been consulting with scientists including Redmond about using seaweed in the beverage. Redmond said if researchers can figure out how to farm seaweed on sea farms, then there will be a more sustainable source that could lead to innovation and new products, such as fertilizer, food ingredients, nutritional supplements or beer. NPR also carried the report.

Extension Workshop Focuses on Detecting Internal Parasites

Thursday, July 17th, 2014

University of Maine Cooperative Extension will offer a workshop for farmers on how to detect internal animal parasites from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 9 at J.F. Witter Teaching and Research Center, 160 University Farm Road, Old Town.

Doctors of Veterinary Medicine Jim Weber and Anne Lichtenwalner will demonstrate how to use a microscope to identify common internal parasites of sheep, goats, llamas and alpacas. Cost is $30 per person; registration is required and space is limited to 20.

More information including how to register is online. To request a disability accommodation, call 207.781.6099 or 800.287.1471 (in Maine).

UMaine Cooperative Extension Composting Course Cited in Press Herald Article

Tuesday, July 15th, 2014

A University of Maine Cooperative Extension composting course was mentioned in a Portland Press Herald feature on composter Geoff Hill, 67, of Belgrade. Hill said he first became interested in composting on April 22, 1970 — the first Earth Day — as a way to improve the planet’s health. In the early 1990s, he took a UMaine Extension course to earn the title of Master Composter. He also joined the Maine Compost Team, a group that won the gubernatorial Teamwork Award during his time of service, between 1992 and 1997.

UMaine Extension Cited in AP Report on Late Blight Symptoms in Buxton

Tuesday, July 15th, 2014

The Associated Press reported officials with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension and the Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association say late blight symptoms have been found in a potato field in Buxton. According to officials, late blight is a nontreatable disease that affects potatoes and tomatoes and spreads rapidly in warm and wet conditions. UMaine Extension and MOFGA ask growers and gardeners to take precautions to prevent infections and spread of the disease, according to the article. Maine Public Broadcasting Network, The Republic, Portland Press Herald, WLBZ (Channel 2) and WABI (Channel 5) carried the AP report.

Handley, Moran Interviewed for MPBN Report on Climate Change, Agriculture

Monday, July 14th, 2014

David Handley, a University of Maine Cooperative Extension specialist of vegetables and small fruits at UMaine’s Highmoor Farm in Monmouth, and Renae Moran, a tree fruit specialist with UMaine Extension, were interviewed for a Maine Public Broadcasting Network report titled “Climate change presents Maine farmers with new challenges.” Handley spoke about testing new crops for the region, such as grapes, as the climate changes. Moran, who is currently testing several varieties of peaches, plums and cherries, warns climate change is unpredictable and more research is needed before any farmer is recommended to make a big investment in traditionally warmer weather fruits.