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Summer 2014 Courses

MES 101, Intro to Maine Studies, Robert Gee, online, 6/30 to 8/8
MES 101 – This interdisciplinary approach to the study of Maine draws from sources in history, literature, political science, Native American studies, Franco American studies, and other fields. The unifying theme is the significance of locality in understanding the interaction between the landscape and the people. How does the Maine landscape shape people’s choices? How do the people use the state’s landscape and resources? How do social, demographic, cultural, and environmental factors shape this relationship throughout history? The activities examined include farming, fishing, lobstering, and lumbering. How have commercial interests intersected with environmental concerns? The cultures considered include Native American, early Anglo settlers, later Irish and Franco immigrants, and more recent immigration and refugee communities. Explore the contributions of selected individuals such as Percival Baxter, Edmund S. Muskie, Helen and Scott Nearing, and Roxanne Quimby who have all influenced thinking about the Maine landscape. Satisfies the General Education Population and the Environment and Writing Intensive Requirements.

MES 201, The Maine Coast, Jennifer Pickard, online, 5/19 to 6/27
MES 201 – This course provides an interdisciplinary approach to studying the culture and environment of the Maine coast using sources in art, history, literature, economics, Native American studies, African American studies, and other fields. The unifying theme is the significance of locality in understanding the interaction between the Maine coast and the people. How has the coastal topography shaped human activity there? How have artists and writers helped construct the Maine coast in the popular imagination? How do the people-both currently and in the past-use the state’s coastal landscape and resources? How do social, demographic, cultural, and environmental factors shape this relationship throughout history? We will examine industries such as granite, fishing, shipping, ship building, and tourism to explore how these commercial interests intersect with environmental concerns and link Maine to the global community. Finally, we will ask how we can reconcile further coastal development with the threat to the coast’s fragile environment. Satisfies the General Education Population and Environment, Social Context and Institutions, and the Writing Intensive Requirements.

MES 520/HTY 210, Topics: Maine History, Jennifer Pickard, online 6/16 to 8/8
HTY 210 – This course examines the social, economic, and political history of Maine from prehistoric times to the present. We will discuss the politics and economy of Maine’s past, and also the everyday lives of ordinary people – women, workers, immigrants, Native Americans, rural people and others. Students will be encouraged to explore Maine History through research in their local areas. Satisfies the General Education Western Cultural Tradition and Social Contexts and Institutions Requirements.

MES 520/ANT 425, Recorded Interview Techniques and Methods, Pauleena MacDougall, online, 6/2 to 7/25
ANT 425 – This course introduces students to the theory and methodology of ethnographic and oral history fieldwork as it is practiced by social scientists and humanities researchers. Students learn to prepare research plans, develop questions, and conduct and record interviews. They learn how to navigate the essential practices of permissions, understand the concepts of copyright of research materials as it pertains to interviews, and fulfill the requirements of the Institutional Review Board for the Protection of Human Subjects (IRB) – required training at the University of Maine. Students will learn about the practices of archiving research materials and how to interpret and incorporate interview research into a research paper or documentary.

MES 530/POS 549/MES 498, Maine Politics and Public Policy, Ken Palmer, Mark Brewer, Carolyn Ball, online, 6/2 to 7/18
MES 530 – This seminar examines contemporary issues confronting the State of Maine and the politics that surround such issues. Particular attention is given to Maine’s role in national affairs, its unique environment, political parties and elections, the dynamics of the legislative, executive and judicial branches, the structure and operation of local governmental institutions, including regional governance, and the formulation and administration of state and local politics, including taxing and spending policies.

MES 598- Directed Study in Maine Studies (graduate students only) contact Carol Toner at 581-3147 or Toner@maine.edu

 

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