Morse Mentioned in Forecaster Article on Green Crabs

August 27th, 2014 8:52 AM
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Dana Morse, a Maine Sea Grant researcher who works at the University of Maine’s Darling Marine Center, was quoted in The Forecaster’s article, “Even in retreat, green crabs confound Maine shellfish industry.” Morse said there is a small, but motivated group in the state looking for ways to market the crabs. He added one idea — that hasn’t yet panned out — is to use the crabs as bait for the conch fishing industry in Massachusetts.

Catch the Buzz About Beekeeping

August 25th, 2014 1:24 PM
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University of Maine Cooperative Extension and the Maine State Beekeepers Association (MSBA) will offer Beginner Bee School, 6–8:30 p.m. Wednesdays, Oct. 1-29, at Anderson Learning Center, 21 Bradeen St., Springvale.

Instructor Larry Peiffer, master beekeeper and former MSBA vice president, will discuss honeybee colonies, hive construction, pests and diseases and honey production. During the five-week course, participants will also observe area hives and gain hands-on experience during a field lab. Cost is $90 per person/$130 for two people who share the text and materials. A one-year membership in the York County Beekeepers Association is included with the fee. Sept. 19 is the deadline to register.

More information, including registration, is available online or by contacting the UMaine Extension York County office at 800.287.1535 (in state), 207.324.2814 or rebecca.gowdy@maine.edu. To request a disability accommodation, call Frank Wertheim, 800.287.1535 (in state) or 207.324.2814

Maine Grain and Oilseed Newsletter August 2014 Issue Available

August 19th, 2014 10:16 AM
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field of ripe grain

Dear Grower,

The August 2014 issue of the Maine Grain and Oilseed Newsletter contains articles on seed bed preparation, tillage radish cover crops, and a reprint of last year’s article on harvest efficiency and combine adjustment.

Sincerely,
Andrew Plant, Extension Agriculture Educator

57 Houlton Road, Presque Isle, ME 04769
207.764.3361 or 1.800.287.1462
extension.umaine.edu/aroostook

Made in Maine: Thoughts on Food, Animals, and Agriculture

August 18th, 2014 10:59 AM
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Donald E Hoenig, VMD, writes about foot and mouth disease in his most recent post for Made in Maine: Thoughts on Food, Animals and Agriculture, a blog for Maine farmers. Dr. Hoenig retired as the Maine State Veterinarian in 2012 and, after completing a year-long Congressional Fellowship in Sen. Susan Collins’ office in Washington DC last year, in January 2014 he started working as a part-time Extension Veterinarian for University of Maine Cooperative Extension. Submit questions and comments to dochoenigvmd78@gmail.com. Answers to selected questions will appear in future blog posts.

WGME Interviews Dill About Tick that can Cause Food Allergy

August 11th, 2014 2:55 PM
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WGME (Channel 13) spoke with James Dill, a pest management specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, for a report about studies that show a correlation between lone star tick bites and severe allergies to red meat. Dill said the lone star tick is not established yet in Maine. “We’ve had a few cases of it, most of them seem to appear to be people who have traveled out of state and have come back in,” he said, adding Mainers should still take precautions such as walking in the center of a trail, tucking pants into socks, wearing tick repellent and wearing light clothing so the ticks can be seen easily.

FREE WEBINAR: Improving PRRS Control in the Breeding Herd, Growing Pigs, and Entire System

August 8th, 2014 8:46 AM
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August 12, 2014
1:00 PM CST

Industry experts share insights into Field-Applicable PRRS Research & Results
Sponsored by Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc
.

Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) remains one of the leading disease challenges to swine producers today. Recent field research studies shed new light on ways for producers to more effectively manage PRRS virus in the breeding herd, growing pig and throughout the entire production system.

The Improving PRRS Control Webinar, sponsored by Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc., features leading swine veterinary researchers and practitioners reviewing recent PRRS research and sharing own experiences with the disease and how to more effectively manage it.

Who Should Attend the Webinar?

  • Pork producers interested in more effectively controlling PRRS on their farms
  • Pork producers wanting to eliminate PRRS from their system.
  • Swine veterinarians looking at additional control strategies for their clients.
  • Allied pork industry representatives wanting to know the latest on PRRS control.

For more information or to register, visit the PORKNetwork website.

Made in Maine: This Little Piggy

July 17th, 2014 1:27 PM
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two young pigs; photo by Edwin RemsbergDonald E Hoenig, VMD, writes about the issue of swine welfare in his most recent post for Made in Maine: Thoughts on Food, Animals and Agriculture, a blog for Maine farmers. Gestation crates have been banned in Maine since Jan. 1, 2011, but this housing method is widely used elsewhere. After sows are bred, they are often placed in gestation crates for the duration of their pregnancy. These crates allow the sows to stand up and lie down freely, but do not enable them to turn around. Do you think sows should be able to stand up, lie down, and turn around freely? Do you buy your food based on a company’s adoption of certain humane or ethical principles? Are you willing to pay extra for this food? Read more in Made in Maine: Thoughts on Food, Animals and Agriculture, then submit your questions and comments to dochoenigvmd78@gmail.com. Answers to selected questions will appear in future blog posts.

Dr. Hoenig retired as the Maine State Veterinarian in 2012 and, after completing a year-long Congressional Fellowship in Sen. Susan Collins’ office in Washington DC last year, in January 2014 he started working as a part-time Extension Veterinarian for University of Maine Cooperative Extension.

Extension Workshop Focuses on Detecting Internal Parasites

July 17th, 2014 8:38 AM
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University of Maine Cooperative Extension will offer a workshop for farmers on how to detect internal animal parasites from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 9 at J.F. Witter Teaching and Research Center, 160 University Farm Road, Old Town.

Doctors of Veterinary Medicine Jim Weber and Anne Lichtenwalner will demonstrate how to use a microscope to identify common internal parasites of sheep, goats, llamas and alpacas. Cost is $30 per person; registration is required and space is limited to 20.

More information including how to register is online. To request a disability accommodation, call 207.781.6099 or 800.287.1471 (in Maine).

Lichtenwalner Quoted in MPBN Report on Vehicle-Moose Collisions

July 15th, 2014 8:09 AM
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Anne Lichtenwalner, director of the University of Maine’s Animal Health Laboratory, was interviewed by the Maine Public Broadcasting Network for a report on moose collisions in Maine. Lichtenwalner said moose are likely out foraging for food such as tender young plants to try to make up for a tough winter. She said according to research, moose are more active during twilight hours and there is no silver bullet to stop moose-car crashes. “The best thing is just realizing you live in a place where these animals are going to be close to the road, and being extremely careful as a driver” she says. “You know, we do co-exist with these animals and I think we just have to be very watchful.”

Kersbergen Cited in Story about Organic Dairy Farms

June 30th, 2014 4:20 PM
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The Portland Press Herald’s article on a $1.7 million training program launched by Wolfe’s Neck Farm and Stonyfield to invigorate the local and regional organic dairy industry and jumpstart the next generation of organic dairy farmers included statistics from University of Maine Cooperative Extension Professor Rick Kersbergen.

There are currently 285 dairy farms in Maine, compared to 597 in 1995, Kersbergen says. Within the same time frame, Kersbergen says the number of organic dairies has increased from one to 60.