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Research and Development - Faculty Highlights

 

 

Steven Hornsby
Steven Hornsby
Rolled up and tucked away in a corner of the British Library in London sits a hand-drawn map of the Maine coast, created in the years just before the American Revolution... “It’s breathtaking to see,’’ says Stephen Hornsby, a professor of geography and Canadian studies at the University of Maine and the director of UMaine’s Canadian-American Center. “Absolutely magnificent. It’s part of the heritage of the state, but it’s in London. It’s unknown in Maine.’’
David Kress
David Kress
It’s the first class after spring break, and Dave Kress is checking in with the undergraduates in his Advanced Fiction Writing class. The conversation drifts from fashion to pizza before shifting gears to a series of quotations from the French director Jean-Luc Godard. For Kress, the study of fiction and creative writing isn’t solely an academic exercise.
Beth Wieman
Beth Wieman
A painter works within the borders of a canvas. A writer, within the confines of syntax and grammar. But for UMaine composer Beth Wiemann, sound knows no bounds.
Richard Judd
Richard Judd
“By the start of the 20th century, America was a leader in conservation,” Judd says. “We had all these firsts — the first national park, the first national forest. We pioneered every aspect of conservation and all of this is credited to the ideas of just four or five figures. (But) there’s got to be more to it than that. What led up to that?”
Constant Albertson
Constant Albertson
As a ceramic sculptor, Constant Albertson is acutely aware of that inner space. Sometimes in her work, it holds or cradles an object — a slice of apple, a skeleton, an egg — that the viewer can access through a hinged door or an opening in her piece of art. Other times it holds an idea or a message, shrouded by a wall of clay, a secret known only to the artist.
Mark Brewer
Mark Brewer
Politics never take a holiday. But in the months leading up to a presidential election, the rhetoric is particularly poignant, with political pundits hanging on every word. This is Mark Brewer’s favorite time of year.
Sudarshan Chawathe
Sudarshan Chawathe
Researchers at the University of Maine have assembled an interactive website called 10Green.org that rates the air quality of locations in the U.S. on a 1-to-10 scale. Enter a zip code or name of a city or town and up pops the environmental health score for that location, based on 10 categories of pollutants in the air. The higher the score, the healthier the air.
Susan Groce
Susan Groce
To say Susan Groce is down to earth is an understatement. Her work--as artist, art professor and chair of the University of Maine Department of Art--is firmly grounded in the natural world.
James Fastook
James Fastook
Though his specialty is glaciology and much of his research falls squarely into the category of climate change, James Fastook is first and foremost a classical physicist whose specialty is solving numerical equations through a computer.
David Hiebeler
David Hiebeler
University of Maine mathematics professor David Hiebeler, in conjunction with computer science and mathematics major Peter Bilodeau of Greenville, Maine, has developed an iPhone and iPad app intended to help with the outreach Hiebeler does in Maine schools.
Jessica Miller
Jessica Miller
When Terri Schiavo died in March 2005, 13 days after her feeding tube was removed and 15 years after brain damage left her in a persistent vegetative state, the nation was watching. Millions of people, whether proponents of right to life or death with dignity, will never look at end-of-life issues the same way again. That's good, according to medical ethicist Jessica Miller.
Andre Khalil
Andre Khalil
A method developed by a UMaine mathematician to get a much more detailed look at cellular morphology has the potential to aid in early cancer detection. Andre Khalil has developed a computational algorithmic method for characterizing three-dimensional images of cellular nuclei.
Michael Grillo
Michael Grillo
For Michael Grillo, photography has become a way to more fully understand the choices painters made. For instance, it’s one thing to read about Vermeer’s use of a camera obscura — a filmless camera that provides perspectives beyond what the eye can see. It’s another to get behind the camera and imagine what lenses the painter used — and, more important, why.
Naomi Jacobs
Naomi Jacobs
For Naomi Jacobs, chair of the University of Maine's English Department, utopias of the literary variety have shaped her worldview since the 1980s.
Robert Lad
Robert Lad
“Our ability to deposit ceramic thin films with atomic-level precision is yielding a wide range of coatings with unique properties.” — Robert Lad, Professor of Physics
Laurie Hicks
Laurie Hicks
Laurie Hicks, a professor of art at the University of Maine, is part of a team of researchers working to make these art forms more accessible to an English-speaking audience. This past summer, Hicks worked as a documentary photographer for ChinaVine.org, a collective that aims to bring Chinese culture to life through narrative, video and photography.
Susan McKay
Susan McKay
Almost 50 Maine middle and high schools will have a chance to redesign their physical science curricula with the help a $12.3 million grant from the National Science Foundation to the University of Maine’s Maine Center for Research in STEM Education.
Ben Friedlander
Ben Friedlander
UMaine English Professor, Ben Friedlander, provides a new view on Emily Dickinson's Civil War-era poetry. “Her work is so resistant to definitive interpretations that there can be a controversy over what she intends or even what’s plausible to imagine as the subject of the poetry,” says Ben Friedlander, a University of Maine associate professor of English and one of the driving forces behind UMaine’s National Poetry Foundation and New Writing Series.
Michael Socolow
Michael Socolow
Socolow has spent nearly two decades reading and writing about broadcast and, to some degree, print media. A former CNN assignment editor covering the news of Southern California, including the O.J. Simpson trial, he also worked for three Olympics broadcasting entities — Radio-Television Olympica, Atlanta Olympic Broadcasting and the Sydney Olympic Broadcasting Organization.
Kirsten Jacobson
Kirsten Jacobson
For Kirsten Jacobson, a professor of philosophy at the University of Maine, neuroses aren’t about food. Or crowds. Or symptoms. They’re the result of a fundamentally problematic way of being in the world.
Stephen Miller
Stephen Miller
In his research, historian Stephen Miller investigates the role of the military in the pursuit, sustenance and development of the British Empire from 1850 to 1902. That includes the manipulation of the British media by the military to shape attitudes about race, class and empire.
Warren Riess
Warren Riess
Marine archaeologist Warren Riess at the World Trade Center site in New York City, where the remains of a light coaster ship from the late 18th or early 19th centuries were unearthed this past summer.
Phillip Silver
Phillip Silver
Music amidst the madness. UMaine musician records CD of chamber works silenced by the Third Reich. “Chamber Music of Leone Sinigaglia” features a violin sonata, cello sonata, cavatina for violin and piano and romanze for cello and piano by the Italian composer.
Brian Robinson
Brian Robinson
New research led by University of Maine anthropologist Brian Robinson and three UMaine graduate students, working in cooperation with colleagues at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Mass., and the University of Montreal, has reconstructed the Bull Brook site plan and completed a full analysis of artifact distributions.
Constanza Ocampo-Raeder
Constanza Ocampo-Raeder
Anthropologist Constanza Ocampo-Raeder has traveled to the Peruvian Amazon since 1996 and spent two years living among the Ese eja people. Her research sheds light on the way cultural traditions influence the management of natural resources.
Laura Lindenfeld
Laura Lindenfeld
It’s what audiences don’t see in food films— or don’t really think about — that intrigues Laura Lindenfeld, a University of Maine mass communication professor whose research centers on food media, film in particular.
Marie Hayes
Marie Hayes
Neuroscientist Marie Hayes has studied sleep neurophysiology and behavior, including movement and arousal, in the youngest of humans for more than 27 years. Hayes focuses on the consequences of prenatal exposure to alcohol, opiates and other drugs on the developing brain.
Steve Evans, Carla Billitteri, Benjamin Friedlander and Jennifer Moxley
Steve Evans, Carla Billitteri, Benjamin Friedlander and Jennifer Moxley
NPF’s original stewards have all passed away in the past six years, but their legacy lives on in the critical and creative work of Evans, Carla Billitteri, Benjamin Friedlander and Jennifer Moxley, who represent the foundation’s next generation. The four have continued its tradition of championing the experimental and the avant-garde, and they’re poised to make their own mark.
Shannon McCoy
Shannon McCoy
The Dalai Lama holds that compassion — concern for the well-being of others — leads to happiness. Now a new study has found that compassion may also have health benefits in the form of stress reduction for women.
Amy Fried
Amy Fried
From surveying the agricultural economy or troop morale to plan and hone public policy to monitoring public approval or testing media messages, polls have evolved into essential and increasingly accepted tools for governing in both the executive and legislative branches, write Amy Fried of the University of Maine and Douglas Harris of Loyola University Maryland in the journal The Historian.
Kristin Sobolik
Kristin Sobolik
University of Maine anthropologist Kristin Sobolik argues that you are what you eat — and what your ancestors ate, and what their ancestors ate, and so on, for millennia. For that reason, today’s human diet is in a sad state of affairs and, quite frankly, our bodies weren’t designed for this.
Amy Blackstone
Amy Blackstone
As University of Maine sociologist Amy Blackstone and her colleagues have found, one workplace experience can happen at any age: sexual harassment.
 


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