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Pest ID - Pest Habitat

Where did you find it?

Inside House / Garage / Shed, etc:
Jump to section with pests of carpets and clothing fabrics (carpet beetles, clothes moths) Jump to section with insects that are often spotted on a mattress, sofa or other furniture with upholstery Jump to section with critters you might find in your pet's water dish, your sink, bathtub, toilet, etc.
Jump to section with insects and other arthropods that can enter homes via hitching a ride on firewood Jump to section with insects, mites and ticks that may be found on humans Jump to section with pests found in wet or damp places, such as a basement
Jump to section with some likely insects that might be seen just flying around inside the home. Jump to section with insects and ticks that you might find on your dog, cat, or other pet Jump to section with pests found in wet or rotten wood, such as carpenter ants
Jump to section with pests found typically in the kitchen or any food-storage areas Jump to section with insects associated with potted plants (not necessarily harmful to the plants)
Vegetable Garden:
Jump to section with broccoli, cabbage and other brassica pests
Jump to section with lettuce, endive, escarole and spinach pests
Jump to section with common pests of beans Jump to section with common potato and eggplant pests
Jump to section with common pests of squash, cucumbers, pumpkins, melons (cucurbits) Jump to section with common sweet corn pests
Jump to section with common pests of peppers Jump to section with common tomato pests
Note: UMaine Extension has a publication entitled Pest Management for the Home Vegetable Garden in Maine, which may also be useful to you.

Fruits / Berries – On or Near:
Jump to section with common pests of apples Link to UMaine Extension's Cranberry site and its listing of the major insect pests of cranberries in Maine Jump to section with common pests of strawberries
Jump to section with common pests of blueberries Link to a University of Minnesota Fact Sheet detailing the major insect pests of raspberries See also the New England Small Fruit Pest Management Guide (2008-2009) [pdf]
Yard / Landscape Area:
Jump to section with common pests of turf and grass Jump to section with common pests (and possibly some incidentals) of trees and shrubs Jump to section listing insect pests likely to be seen on roses
Jump to section with critters you might see in your pool, birdbath, or other open water container Jump to section listing other landscape flowers, besides roses, and their associated insect pests


 Carpet / Clothing (Fabric):

Carpet Beetles and Carpet Beetle larvae Clothes Moths and 'case-making' larvae a Flea - probably a Cat Flea a Larder Beetle (these are often confused with Carpet Beetles) Larder Beetle larvae


Firewood:

See also the Maine Forest Service’s Insects From Firewood publication, and please remember: Don’t transport firewood!

Carpenter Ants (including queen stage) Earwigs a Gypsy Moth female and egg mass Gypsy Moths and Gypsy Moth caterpillars Horntail (also called a Wood Wasp because they are wasp-like in appearance) a representative Longhorned Beetle (members of this large family all have very long antennae) a representative metallic wood-boring beetle Millipedes (insect relatives) Powderpost Beetle - Powderpost beetle is a term used to describe any of several species of small (1/8th-3/4th inches long), wood-boring insects whose feeding reduces wood to a fine, flour-like powder, as seen in this picture (this particular specimen has wood powder all over it and all around it as well) A Sowbug picture of a Wood Cockroach (photographed on Mount Desert Island, Maine) Spiders, such as this Jumping Spider


Wet or Rotten Wood:

Carpenter Ants (including queen stage) Earwigs Millipedes (insect relatives) A Sowbug picture of a Wood Cockroach (photographed on Mount Desert Island, Maine)


Wet or Damp Areas: (indoors and/or outdoors)

Black Flies (most people are all too familiar with these pesty flies) Crane Flies a cricket (such as this Camel Cricket) a deer fly a female dobsonfly  a male dobsonfly a Drain Fly (also called a Moth Fly) a Fungus Gnat (adult) Closer view of the Fungus Gnat pictured at left Fungus Gnat larvae inside the cap of a mushroom a Horse Fly a Horsehair worm beside a US penny for scale purposes a mosquito resting on a house ceiling Silverfish Springtails (order Collembola) (also called snow fleas because they are more readily visible when seen on the surface of snow) picture of a Wood Cockroach (photographed on Mount Desert Island, Maine)


Mattress / Sofa (or most any Furniture with Upholstery)

Bed Bugs a Cat Flea Head Lice  A type of assassin bug called a Masked Hunter


Just Flying Around Inside or at a Light Source:

Bald-faced Hornets (guarding their nest) a blow fly resting on a stone a Carpenter Ant Queen - winged stage Carpet Beetles and Carpet Beetle larvae a kind of Click beetle Clothes Moths and 'case-making' larvae Crane Flies a female dobsonfly a male dobsonfly a Drain Fly (also called a Moth Fly) FishflyFruit Flies Fungus Gnat larvae inside the cap of a mushroom a Fungus Gnat (adult) Closer view of the Fungus Gnat pictured at left a house fly adult Indian Meal Moth Picture of a katydid (also sometimes called a Long-horned Meadow Grasshopper) a Predaceous Diving Beetle a Ladybug / ladybird beetle on a windowsill a Stonefly adult (a species that emerges in Maine in March) an adult stonefly a Western Conifer Seed Bug a Yellowjacket worker


Kitchen / Food Storage Areas:

Pavement Ants (very small in size) a blow fly resting on a stone an American Cockroach Cockroaches (both the German and Brown-banded) picture of a Wood Cockroach (photographed on Mount Desert Island, Maine) a Drain Fly (also called a Moth Fly) Flour Beetles (a pair of Broad-Horned Flour Beetles, dorsal view) Grain Beetles Fruit Flies Indian Meal Moth a Larder Beetle (these are often confused with Carpet Beetles) Larder Beetle larvae Mealworms (adults and larvae); Mealworms are not really worms at all but are the larval form of darkling beetles Silverfish


On a Person / People:

See also “Fabric Pests” [pdf] (University of Maryland)

Bed Bugs a bed bug a Cat Flea Head Lice a Black Widow spider (not native to Maine) photo of a deer tick next to a dog tick (both are unfed or non-engorged, and both are beside a US penny for relative size comparisons) a deer tick (non-engorged) next to a US penny for scale purposes Ticks (Deer and Dog) Engorged (labeled)


On Pets or Associated with Pets:

Carpet Beetles and Carpet Beetle larvae a Cat Flea Indian Meal Moth a Larder Beetle (these are often confused with Carpet Beetles) Larder Beetle larvae Mealworms (adults and larvae); Mealworms are not really worms at all but are the larval form of darkling beetles photo of a deer tick next to a dog tick (both are unfed or non-engorged, and both are beside a US penny for relative size comparisons) a deer tick (non-engorged) next to a US penny for scale purposes Ticks (Deer and Dog) Engorged (labeled)  

  • Ticks Ticks are sometimes found indoors after hitching a ride on you or a family pet.


Potted Plants:

NOTE: If either of these two pests is abundant, it is likely due to over-watering.

a Fungus Gnat (adult) Closer view of the Fungus Gnat pictured at left Fungus Gnat larvae inside the cap of a mushroom Springtails (order Collembola) (also called snow fleas because they are more readily visible when seen on the surface of snow) Two-Spotted Spider Mites Whiteflies


Sink, Tub, Pet Dish, Toilet, etc:

an American Cockroach Cockroaches (both the German and Brown-banded) a cricket (such as this Camel Cricket) a Drain Fly (also called a Moth Fly) a Horsehair worm beside a US penny for scale purposes  Millipedes (insect relatives) A Sowbug a Larder Beetle (these are often confused with Carpet Beetles) Larder Beetle larvae


VEGETABLES

 

Beans:

See also the New England Bean Pest Management Survey Summary [pdf]

Aphids Green Peach Aphids Potato Aphids a Cabbage Looper -- also a bean pest Corn Earworm - both larvae and adult moth stages are shown photo of several Corn Rootworm larvae in soil some different kinds of cutworms, all pictured together European Corn Borer larvae (also feed on beans) Potato Leafhoppers a Potato Leafhopper a Leafhopper nymph (shown here on a rose leaf) Mexican Bean Beetle - eggs, larvae and adults are shown. a Tarnished Plant Bug (pest on some key fruit crops as well, such as strawberries and apples) Two-spotted Spider Mites pair of wireworms in soil


Broccoli, Cabbage and other Brassicas:

a Cabbage Looper -- also a bean pest Cabbage Maggot Diamondback Moth (Larva and Pupa shown) Imported Cabbageworm Imported Cabbageworm (eggs)


Cucurbits (zucchini/squash, melons, pumpkins, cucumbers)

See also our Powdery Mildew of Cucurbits (Disease) Fact Sheet.

Aphids a Cabbage Looper -- also a bean pest Two-spotted Spider Mites a Squash Vine Borer and some wilted leaves that are symptomatic a Striped Cucumber Beetle a Southern Corn Rootworm beetle photo of several Corn Rootworm larvae in soil


Lettuce, Endive, Escarole and Spinach:

a Cabbage Looper -- also a bean pest Imported Cabbageworm Imported Cabbageworm eggs an adult leafhopper (just as an example of a basic leafhopper) a Leafhopper nymph (shown here on a rose leaf)


Peppers:

See also North Carolina State University’s “Pests of Pepper” page

a Cabbage Looper -- also a bean pest Corn Earworm - both larvae and adult moth stages are shown some different kinds of cutworms, all pictured together European Corn Borer larvae Hornworms (both a tobacco and a tomato hornworm together) Flea Beetles Green Peach Aphids a Leafhopper nymph (shown here on a rose leaf) an adult leafhopper (just as an example of a basic leafhopper) a Potato Leafhopper a Tortoise beetle


Potatoes and Eggplant:

See also UMaine Extension’s “Potato IPM” page, as well as Cornell’s Late Blight page.

a Cabbage Looper -- also a bean pest Colorado Potato Beetles (and larvae) European Corn Borer larvae a Potato Leafhopper a Tortoise beetle pair of wireworms in soil


Tomatoes:

See also Late Blight (Cornell)

Blister Beetles Colorado Potato Beetles (and larvae) a Cabbage Looper -- also a bean pest Corn Earworm - both larvae and adult moth stages are shown some different kinds of cutworms, all pictured together Hornworms (both a tobacco and a tomato hornworm together) Thrips  a Tortoise beetle


Sweet Corn:

(Many of the ‘worm’ pests look very similar to one another.)

An Armyworm caterpillar a Fall Armyworm caterpillar a Common Stalk Borer larva Corn Earworm - both larvae and adult moth stages are shown photo of several Corn Rootworm larvae in soil a Northern Corn Rootworm Beetle a Southern Corn Rootworm beetle some different kinds of cutworms, all pictured together European Corn Borer larvae a cluster of Japanese Beetles feeding on some leaves Sap Beetles (also called Picnic Beetles) pair of wireworms in soil


FRUITS and BERRIES

 

Apples:

See also Growing Fruit Trees in Maine – Insect Pests and/or UMaine Extension’s Apple IPM pages, for pest report newsletters, publications, and more!  You may also wish to visit the apple section of our plant disease images (scroll to the apple section once you are there), and another helpful site is Cornell’s New York State IPM Fact Sheets for Tree Fruit.

an Apple Maggot fly as well as a larva (maggot) Codling Moth (larva and adult stage shown) Picture of a pair of European Apple Sawfly larvae and the damage they inflict a cluster of Japanese Beetles feeding on some leaves a Leafhopper nymph (shown here on a rose leaf) an adult leafhopper (just as an example of a basic leafhopper) picture of a leafroller larva (there are many species of leafrollers) Plum Curculio (larvae and adults) a Roundheaded Apple Tree Borer adult a Longhorned Beetle larva (such as the Roundheaded Tree Borer shown to the left of this image) San Jose Scale insects a Tarnished Plant Bug (pest on some key fruit crops as well, such as strawberries and apples)


Blueberries:

See also UMaine Extension’s Wild Blueberry Insect Fact Sheets and the 2010 Insect Control Guide for Wild Blueberries or, for high-bush blueberries, visit Insect Management in Blueberries at the University of Florida.

a Blueberry Flea Beetle 4 photos showing the blueberry maggot (fly and larvae) Blueberry Spanworm Japanese Beetles (on highbush blueberries) a Rose Chafer adult (a type of scarab beetle) A pair of Spotted-wing Drosophila fruit flies -Male pictured on left; Female on right


Raspberries:

See also Cornell University’s Raspberry Diagnostic Tool. Plus, Cane and Crown Borers (Govt. of Ontario, Canada)

Raspberry Cane Borer a Raspberry Fruitworm larva on a raspberry Sap Beetles (also called Picnic Beetles) a cluster of Japanese Beetles feeding on some leaves picture of a leafroller larva (there are many species of leafrollers) a Rose Chafer adult (a type of scarab beetle) A pair of Spotted-wing Drosophila fruit flies -Male pictured on left; Female on right a Tarnished Plant Bug (pest on some key fruit crops as well, such as strawberries and apples)


Strawberries:

See also the photos [pdf] that are part of the Northeast Vegetable and Strawberry Pest Identification Guide, and be sure to visit UMaine Extension’s Strawberry IPM pages as well where you’ll find a wealth of information including a strawberry newsletter, strawberry fact sheets, etc.

a Leafhopper nymph (shown here on a rose leaf) an adult leafhopper (just as an example of a basic leafhopper) a Potato Leafhopper picture of a leafroller larva (there are many species of leafrollers) Sap Beetles (also called Picnic Beetles) Strawberry Clipper Weevil Strawberrry Root Weevil (several images together, including some showing the grub stage as well) a Tarnished Plant Bug (pest on some key fruit crops as well, such as strawberries and apples) Two-spotted Spider Mites White Grubs (4 separate pictures and specimens)


YARD / LANDSCAPE:

 Lawn / Grassy Area:

Carpenter Ants (including queen stage) Armyworms Black Flies Crane Flies some different kinds of cutworms, all pictured together EuropeanChaferAdult-labeled a Horsehair worm beside a US penny for scale purposes a cluster of Japanese Beetles feeding on some leaves Picture of a katydid (also sometimes called a Long-horned Meadow Grasshopper) a Rose Chafer adult (a type of scarab beetle) photo of a deer tick next to a dog tick (both are unfed or non-engorged, and both are beside a US penny for relative size comparisons) Picture showing two representative species of Tussock moth caterpillars found in Maine a caterpillar of the White Hickory Tussock moth crawling along the ground (having fallen out of its host tree) Two Banded Woollybear Caterpillars a Yellow Bear Caterpillar, also called a Yellow Woollybear a Banded Argiope (also called a Banded Garden Spider) (harmless to people) a kind of spider called a Crab Spider a species of Fishing Spider


Pool, Pond, Open Water Container, Puddle, etc.:

a female dobsonfly a male dobsonfly Fishfly a Horsehair worm beside a US penny for scale purposes pair of adult mayflies (two different species) a total of three mosquito larvae shown in two different images a Predaceous Diving Beetle a Stonefly adult (a species that emerges in Maine in March) an adult stonefly a Water Scorpion pair of Water Striders photographed on Mount Desert Island, Maine


Trees / Shrubs:

See also the Maine State Forest Service’s list of Insect & Disease Fact Sheets. For apple tree insects, see our ‘Apples‘ section above.

a Brown-tail Moth Caterpillar a Brown-tail Nest Carpenter Ants (including queen stage)  CecropiaMoth a Cicada found in Maine an EasternTentCaterpillar and an example of the communal nests they make in trees a Fall Webworm caterpillar Forest Tent Caterpillars (these do not build nests in trees like the Eastern Tent Caterpillars do) an example of a Geometer (Looper) Moth and a US dime for size/scale purposes a Gypsy Moth female resting atop her egg mass GypsyMoth a Horned Spanworm (an example of an inchworm/spanworm) a Horntail (also called a Wood Wasp) resting on a tree trunk a cluster of Japanese Beetles feeding on some leaves a Luna Moth a Roundheaded Apple Tree Borer adult a representative metallic wood-boring beetle a Rose Chafer adult (a type of scarab beetle) three Viburnum Leaf Beetle larvae feeding on the inner bark of a branch of a highbush cranberry tree after all the leaves had already been consumed. a Western Conifer Seed Bug a caterpillar of the White Hickory Tussock moth crawling along the ground (having fallen out of its host tree) picture of a White Hickory Tussock caterpillar


Roses:A Blue Girl (hybrid) rose (photo by Charles Armstrong)

See also Insect Pests of Roses by the University of Minnesota Extension, and also UMaine Extension’s Black Spot of Rose (disease) Fact Sheet.

Aphids a cluster of Japanese Beetles feeding on some leaves an adult leafhopper (just as an example of a basic leafhopper) a Leafhopper nymph (shown here on a rose leaf) a Rose Chafer adult (a type of scarab beetle) a Broad-nosed Weevil on a rose leaf


OTHER FLOWERS [listed alphabetically]:

 

Note: Crab Spiders are common on many kinds of flowers. example of a Crab spider

Example of an aster (photo by Charles Armstrong)

Asters: [Key Diseases: Powdery mildew and rust]

Bleeding Hearts (Dicentra): [Key Disease: Crown rot (if soil is too wet)]

Canna Lillies (Canna): [Key Diseases: Bud rot (Xanthomonas), Canna rust, and certainviruses, some of which are Canna-specific.]

Chinese Bellflowers / Balloon Flowers (Platycodon): [Key Diseases:Root rots]

Chrysanthemums: [Key Diseases: Aster yellows, botrytis, leaf spots, viruses, and wilts]

Cockscombs (Celosia):

Coneflowers / Black-eyed Susans (Rudbeckia): [Key Diseases: Leaf spots, aster yellows]

Dahlias: [Key Diseases: Aster yellows, bacterial stem rot, botrytis and wilt diseases]

Echinacea:

Gladiolus: [Key Diseases: Corm rot, wilt diseases, viruses, bacterial leaf blight]

Globe Amaranths (Gomphrena):

Larkspurs (Delphinium): [Key Diseases: Stem rot and powdery mildew]

Liatris: [ Key Diseases: Leaf spots, powdery mildew, rust, and root knot nematodes]

Lilies (‘True Lilies’): [ Key Diseases: Botrytis and Lily Mosaic Virus]

Marigolds: [Key Diseases: Aster yellows and botrytis]

Peonies (or Paeonies): [Key Diseases: [Diseases are generally quite rare, esp. in small plantings] Botrytis (paeoniae and cinerea), iron chorosis, leaf spots, root rots & wilts]

Phlox: [ Key Diseases: Leaf spots, wilt diseases and powdery mildew (Univ. of Minnesota)]

Pot Marigolds (Calendula):

Sage (Salvia): [Key Diseases (Cornell)]

Strawflowers / Everlastings (Helichrysum): [Key Diseases: Aster yellows and Verticillium wilt]

Snapdragons: [Key Diseases: Rust & Verticillium wilt, aster yellows]

Statice (Limonium): [Key Diseases: Aster yellows, botrytis, crown rots, flower blight, leaf spots]

Sunflowers (Helianthus): [ Key Diseases: Leaf spots, powdery mildew, and rust]

Tulips: [Key Diseases: (Two good sites) Univ. of Michigan and Univ. of Connecticut]Example of a tulip (a variety called Queen of Night) (photo by Charles Armstrong)

Tulips are quite hardy, but some insects (and slugs) do show up from time to time and can become problematic.

Yarrows (Achillea): (other names include allheal or bloodwort) [Key Diseases: Powdery mildew, downy mildew, rust, and rhizoctonia stem rot]

Zinnias: [ Key Diseases: Alternaria leaf spot, aster yellows, bacterial leaf spot, and powdery mildew]

 


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