Fruit Growers Alert 9/30/13: Spotted Wing Drosophila Counts Remain at High Levels

September 30th, 2013 3:49 PM

Fruit Growers Alert – September 30, 2013

For full page print version, please see link at the bottom. Click on photos to enlarge.

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA COUNTS REMAIN AT HIGH LEVELS

We continue to capture spotted wing drosophila flies at all of our monitoring sites from southern, mid-state and coastal Maine. While counts have dropped in some locations over the past week, levels are still high enough to infest any unprotected berries still remaining in the field. Highest counts have been at the coastal sites and lowest counts have been in the more northern and western sites. Our experience has shown that the flies will survive through repeated frosts and continue to infest fruit well into the fall. Therefore, any farms that still have late ripening raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, grapes or day neutral strawberries should continue to protect their crops with an approved insecticide. In some locations a 7-day spray interval may be adequate to prevent infestation, but areas with high fly populations may still require a 4 to 5-day spray schedule.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Larva in Blackberry

SWD Larvae in Blackberry, photo by David Handley

Spotted Wing Drosophila Maggot in Raspberry

SWD Maggot in Raspberry, photo by David Handley

Recommended insecticide products that provide good control of drosophila on berries include Delegate®, Brigade®, Bifenture®, Danitol®, Mustang Max®, malathion and Assail®. Effectiveness of these products can range from three to seven days.  Please check product labels for rates, post-harvest intervals and safety precautions.

Four Rules for Managing Spotted Wing Drosophila:

  1. Spray ripening fruit regularly with an approved insecticide (every 5-7 days).
  2. Harvest crop frequently and regularly; remove all ripe and rotten fruit from the field.
  3. Chill all harvested fruit immediately to as close to 33º F as soon as possible; hold in refrigeration until ready to sell.
  4. Open up the planting through pruning and spacing to improve light and air penetration and reduce moisture and humidity within the plant canopy.

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME  04259        Orono, ME  04473
207.933.2100                          1.800.287.0279

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

Pesticide Applicator Training – November 14, 2013

September 30th, 2013 1:42 PM

Pesticide Applicator License Exam Training

Thursday, November 14, 2013
8:00 AM to 3:30 PM
Highmoor Farm, 52 US Route 202, Monmouth, Maine 04259
Registration fee is $10.00. Lunch cost is additional $15.00 (optional).  PREREGISTRATION IS REQUIRED.

Contact Pam St. Peter at pamela.stpeter@maine.edu or 207.933.2100 to preregister.

Cost for registration is $10.00 per person for the training session, plus an optional $15.00 if you would like to sign up for the catered lunch. Checks are to be made payable to University of Maine Cooperative Extension.

The Core pesticide training and exam will be offered in the morning, followed by lunch. There will be Orchard Fruit Commodity AND Vegetable Commodity trainings and exams offered concurrently in the afternoon.

Please go to the Pesticide Safety Education Program webpage for information on acquiring study materials, or call Meghan Dill at 207.581.3878. The Core Manual cost is $15.00, which also includes a pesticide application logbook. The Orchard Fruit Private Manual costs $8.00 and a digital version of this manual is available for free. The Vegetable Private Manual cost is $8.00.

Attending a training session or purchase of manuals is not required to take an applicator license exam. The training and manuals provide useful information at subsidized cost to enhance safety and minimize risk.

Do You Need a Pesticide Applicator License?
An Agricultural Basic pesticide applicator license is required for fruit, vegetable and grain growers who use only general use (over-the-counter) pesticides and annually sell more than $1,000 of plants or plant products intended for human consumption. To obtain an Agricultural Basic pesticide applicator license, the candidate must pass a written, closed book examination. The test is called the Core Exam and covers general pesticide information.

A Private pesticide applicator license is necessary for anyone who wishes to purchase, apply or supervise application of general use or restricted or limited use pesticides with the intent of producing a commodity. These pesticides may be used only on property owned, leased or rented by the licensee or licensee’s employer. Typical Private license holders include farmers, greenhouse operators, florists, orchardists, Christmas tree growers and foresters. To obtain a Private license, the candidate must pass the Core Exam, and a second Commodity Exam that measures knowledge of pest management practices for a given crop or crop family.

How Do You Get a License?
Once the required exam(s) are passed, the candidate is certified for three years and is eligible for a license. Licenses are obtained by submitting an application and $15.00 to the Maine Board of Pesticides Control.

AGENDA

8:00 AM Core Pesticide Safety Training, Part I
9:30 AM Break
9:45 AM Core Training, Part II

11:15 AM Core Exam
A passing grade on the Core Exam makes a person eligible for an Agricultural Basic pesticide applicator license.
12:30 PM Lunch – catered or bring your own
1:15 PM Orchard Fruit Commodity Training and Vegetable Commodity Training
Held concurrently
2:15 PM Break
2:30 PM Orchard Fruit Commodity Exam and Vegetable Commodity Exam
Held concurrently
A passing grade on the Core Exam AND Commodity Exam makes a person eligible for a Private pesticide applicator license.


Directions to Highmoor Farm, 52 US Route 202, Monmouth, Maine 04259 (207.933.2100)

Traveling North on I-95:  Drive north on the Maine Turnpike (I-95) and take Exit 86 in Sabattus. Turn left onto Route 9/Middle Road. Travel about 2 miles on Route 9 East, then turn left onto Route 132. After 4.5 miles, turn left onto Leeds Junction Road. Travel about 2.8 miles, then turn right onto U.S. Route 202 and travel about 1.3 miles up the road until you see Highmoor Farm on the right.

Traveling South on I-95:  Take Exit 109B in Augusta. Continue west on U.S. Route 202 and travel about 15 miles. Highmoor Farm will be on the left.

If you are a person with a disability and will need any accommodations to participate in this program, please call Pam St. Peter at the Highmoor Farm at 207.933.2100 or TDD 1.800.287.8957 to discuss your needs at least 7 days prior to this event.

UMaine Advice Credited for Successful Pumpkin Crop

September 23rd, 2013 2:19 PM

WVII (Channel 7) spoke with a Corinth farmer who followed advice from the University of Maine for a report on this year’s pumpkin harvest. Despite poor harvesting reports around the state due to wet weather, Beverly Tate said her fields are doing well after following a tip from UMaine to cut pumpkins from vines with mildew in order to keep the crop healthy.

Highmoor Farm Fall Harvest Sale – October 10, 2013

September 16th, 2013 12:23 PM

2013 Highmoor Fall Harvest Sale at UMaine

Staff from UMaine’s Highmoor Farm in Monmouth will be on the Orono campus again this fall to sell high quality apples and pumpkins.  We hope to see you there!

Highmoor Fall Harvest Sale
Thursday, October 10, 2013 –
weather permitting
10:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Located by the Cyrus Pavilion Theatre, between Winslow Hall and Fogler Library

Apples

The following apple varieties will be on sale:
Cortland                            Empire
Gala                                    Golden Delicious
Macoun                             McIntosh
Snow Sweet

Apple prices:  $1.00/lb

$2.00/lb for HoneyCrisp and organically grown HoneyCrisp

Variety of pumpkins

There will be several varieties of pumpkins on sale.

Pumpkin prices:

$3:00/small
$5.00/medium
$8.00/large

 

For more information, please contact Greg Koller, Highmoor Farm Superintendent, at 933.2100 or gkoller@maine.edu.

Moran Quoted in Portland Phoenix Feature on Apple Varieties

September 13th, 2013 12:20 PM

Renae Moran, a tree fruit specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, was quoted in a Portland Phoenix food feature on apple varieties found in Maine. Moran said the gold rush variety is rare in New England because it doesn’t ripen until late October when it’s often too cold. She also said customer demand for organic apples hasn’t matched the hype and that it demands a lot of extra work and money for lower yields.

Moran Quoted in Press Herald Blog on Maine’s Apple Crop

September 13th, 2013 11:07 AM

Renae Moran, a tree fruit specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, spoke about the state’s apple crop for the latest post of the Portland Press Herald blog “The Root: Dispatches from Maine’s food sources.” Moran said this year’s crop is larger than last year’s because the weather during bloom was favorable for pollination. She added that orchards in northern Maine have a lighter crop than southern Maine orchards from poorer pollination weather.

Moran Talks Apple Crop in BDN Article

September 12th, 2013 2:46 PM

Renae Moran, a tree fruit specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, spoke about the state’s apple crop for the Bangor Daily News article “Four generations of growers working at Etna orchard as Maine Apple Sunday approaches.” Moran said orchards south of Bangor benefited from the rains because the wet weather didn’t occur during bloom season.

Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 11 – September 6, 2013

September 6th, 2013 3:06 PM

Sweet Corn

Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 11 – September 6, 2013

For full page print version, please see link at the bottom. Click on photos to enlarge.

Last Regular Issue for 2013

LATE SILKING CORN STILL NEEDS PROTECTION

Higher Earworm Counts in Southern and Coastal Locations

This will be the final issue of the Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter for the 2013 season. I would like to thank all of the growers who participated in the program this year, and our team of IPM scouts including Kara Rowley, Hayden Koller, Tammy Cushman, Griffin Dill and Sean McAuley, with help from John Hutton. Thanks to Pam St. Peter for getting us to print and keeping up the web page.  Input from our readers is welcome. Please call or e-mail us with your questions, comments and suggestions.

SITUATION
The storm last week appears to have brought some corn earworm moths into the state, as well as several inches of rain. Post Labor Day corn has matured quickly, but the market seems to be holding well, even with a plentiful supply. Insect pressure is relatively low for this late in the summer, especially in more northern and inland sites; although any weather coming up from the tropics over the next few weeks could change that status very quickly.

European corn borer:  Moth catches were fairly low and sporadic this week. A weak second generation appears to be showing up in a few locations, but most sites are well under threshold. Fields in Dayton, North Berwick, Wayne and Wells exceeded the threshold of 5 moths per week in silking corn, but only the Wayne field is not presently under a spray interval for corn earworm.

Corn earworm:  Moth counts were higher in some southern and coastal locations this week, suggesting that the recent storm may have brought in some moths. A 4-day spray interval for fresh silking corn was recommended at one site in Cape Elizabeth. A 5-day spray interval was recommended in Monmouth and the other Cape Elizabeth site. A 6-day spray interval was recommended for silking fields in Biddeford, a Dayton site, New Gloucester, North Berwick, Poland Spring, Sabattus, Warren and one Wells site. Remember that any storm fronts moving up from the south can bring lots of corn earworm with them and change the situation rapidly for any silking corn remaining.

Corn Earworm Larvae

Corn Earworm Larvae, photo by David Handley

Fall Armyworm Injury on Corn Leaves

Fall Armyworm Injury on Corn Leaves, photo by David Handley

Fall armyworm:  Moth counts were higher in some sites this week, but most remain under threshold for silking corn. Fall armyworm exceeded the threshold of three moths for silking corn in Cape Elizabeth, Dayton, Monmouth, New Gloucester, Nobleboro, Oxford, Warren and Wells.

Remember to plow down your corn stalks.
Plowing down corn stalks destroys overwintering sites for European corn borer. Winter rye can be planted after plow down to prevent soil erosion and conserve nutrients.

Male and Female Spotted Wing Drosophila Flies

Male (left) and Female (right) Spotted Wing Drosophila, photo by Griffin Dill. Actual size: 2-3 mm.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert:  Fruit fly counts are increasing significantly this week and we’re getting more reports of larvae in ripening fruit, including fall raspberries, blueberries, blackberries and grapes. All ripening fruit should be protected with regular and repeated treatments of an approved insecticide. In most fields a 4 to 5 day spray interval is needed to prevent infestation.  Visit our website for details:  http://umaine.edu/highmoor/spotted-wing-drosophila/.

The New England Vegetable & Fruit Conference will be held in Manchester, New Hampshire on December 17, 18, and 19, 2013. Program and registration information will be coming soon.  Visit the website: http://www.newenglandvfc.org/.

Sincerely,

David T. Handley
Vegetable & Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME  04259        Orono, ME  04473
207.933.2100                          1.800.287.0279

Sweet Corn IPM Weekly Scouting Summary

Location CEW
Moths
ECB
Moths
FAW
Moths
Recommendations / Comments
Auburn 0 0 0 No spray recommended
Biddeford 3 2 1 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Cape Elizabeth I 4 3 0 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Cape Elizabeth II 12 0 5 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Dayton I 1 3 3 One spray recommended for FAW on all silking corn
Dayton II 3 11 1 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Farmington 0 1 1 No spray recommended
Lewiston 0 3 0 No spray recommended
Monmouth 4 3 3 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
New Gloucester 2 0 3 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Nobleboro 0 0 6 One spray recommended for FAW on all silking corn
No. Berwick 3 8 0 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Oxford 0 0 3 One spray recommended for FAW on all silking corn
Poland Spring 2 0 0 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Sabattus 2 1 1 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Wales 0 0 2 No spray recommended
Warren 3 2 9 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Wayne 0 6 0 One spray recommended for ECB on all silking corn
Wells I 0 0 0 No spray recommended
Wells II 2 5 5 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn

 

CEW: Corn earworm (Only fresh silking corn should be sprayed for this insect.)
ECB: European corn borer
FAW: Fall armyworm

Corn Earworm Spray Thresholds for Pheromone Traps

Moths caught per week Moths caught per night Spray interval
0.0 to 1.4 0.0 to 0.2 No spray
1.5 to 3.5 0.3 to 0.5 Spray every 6 days
3.6 to 7.0 0.6 to 1.0 Spray every 5 days
7.1 to 91 1.1 to 13.0 Spray every 4 days
More than 91 More than 13 Spray every 3 days

Thresholds apply only to corn with exposed fresh silk. Lengthen spray intervals by one day if maximum daily temperature is less than 80°F.

European Corn Borer Thresholds
Whorl stage:  30% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Pre-tassel-silk:  15% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Silk:  5 or more moths caught in pheromone traps in one week.

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

Published and distributed in furtherance of the Acts of Congress of May 8 and June 30, 1914, by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, the Land Grant University of the State of Maine and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating.  Cooperative Extension and other agencies of the U.S.D.A. provide equal opportunities in programs and employment.

Moran Talks to WVII about Apple Crop

September 5th, 2013 12:18 PM

Renae Moran, a tree fruit specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, spoke with WVII (Channel 7) about this year’s apple crop. Moran said southern Maine is having an above average year due to the good weather conditions during pollination when trees were in bloom. She said a week later trees in northern Maine came into bloom when there was a long period of rainy, cold weather.

Fruit Growers Alert 8/30/13: Spotted Wing Drosophila Continues to Spread

September 3rd, 2013 11:50 AM

Fruit Growers Alert – August 30, 2013

For full page print version, please see link at the bottom. Click on photos to enlarge.

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA CONTINUES TO SPREAD

All sites that we are monitoring in southern and coastal Maine now have spotted wing drosophila flies and fly counts have increased at some sites this week.  We also have more reports from growers of larvae in fruit, indicating that that even low trap captures signal a significant threat.  Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) flies were captured in traps in Wells, Cape Elizabeth, Limington, Springvale, New Gloucester, Gray, Mechanic Falls, Monmouth, Wales, Livermore Falls, Farmington, Oxford, Bowdoinham, Dresden, Warren, Stillwater and Levant.  Trap captures continue to be very variable, ranging from just one fly to nearly 200, with most still catching fewer than 100 per week.  The coastal sites tend to have more flies than any other locations, but counts have been up and down from week to week at many sites. We expect fly populations to rise further in the coming days and weeks.  If you haven’t yet done so, we recommend that growers set up their own traps to monitor for SWD, and learn to distinguish it from other species that will get into the trap.  We recommend that all ripening fruit be protected with an approved insecticide. Regular and repeated treatments are needed to keep fruit from becoming infested. In some locations a 7-day spray interval has not been adequate to prevent infestation, so we have tightened the spray schedule to every 4 to 5 days. Chilling fruit to as close to 32ºF immediately after harvest can significantly reduce the activity and emergence of any larvae.  Keeping the fields clean of over-ripe and rotten fruit can also help reduce the incidence of this insect.

Fall Raspberries

photo by David Handley

Spotted Wing Drosophila Emerging from Fall Raspberries

photo by James Dill

Raspberries before and after infestation, 48 hours at room temperature after picked.

Recommended insecticide products that provide good control of drosophila on berries include Delegate®, Brigade®, Bifenture®, Danitol®, Mustang Max®, malathion and Assail®.  Effectiveness of these products can range from three to seven days.  Please check product labels for rates, post-harvest intervals and safety precautions.

David T. Handley
Vegetable & Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME  04259        Orono, ME  04473
207.933.2100                          1.800.287.0279

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.