2014 Maine Pollination Workshops

April 11th, 2014 11:55 AM

2014 Maine Pollination Workshops

During the spring and summer of 2014, researchers from the University of Maine are hosting a series of free pollination workshops for fruit and vegetable growers. These workshops are supported by a grant from the Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) program. The workshops will provide instruction on assessing bees’ impact on fruit set and identifying wild bees. They will also include information on strategies to improve habitat for wild bees. For more information, contact Kourtney Collum at kourtney.collum@maine.edu. In case of inclement weather, visit the following website for more information:  http://mainepollinationworkshops.weebly.com/. No preregistration is required for these workshops.

 

Pollination Workshop for Apple Growers

Tuesday, May 20, 2014 from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Rain date:  Thursday, May 22, 2014 from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Highmoor Farm, UMaine Experiment Station, 52 U.S. Route 202, Monmouth, Maine 04259

This workshop is designed specifically for apple growers.

 

Pollination Workshop for Lowbush Blueberry Growers

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 from 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM
Rain date:  Tuesday, June 3, 2014 from 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM
Seven Tree Farm, Route 235, 2740 Western Road, Warren, Maine 04864

This workshop is designed specifically for lowbush blueberry growers.

 

Pollination Workshop II for Lowbush Blueberry Growers

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 from 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM
Rain date:  Wednesday, June 4, 2014 from 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM
Blueberry Hill Farm, UMaine Experiment Station, 1643 Route 1, Jonesboro, Maine 04648

This workshop is designed specifically for lowbush blueberry growers.

 

Pollination Workshop for Squash and Pumpkin Growers

Monday, July 14, 2014 from 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM
Rain date:  Thursday, July 17, 2014 from 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM
Highmoor Farm, UMaine Experiment Station, 52 U.S. Route 202, Monmouth, Maine 04259

This workshop is designed specifically for squash and pumpkin growers.

2013 Spotted Wing Drosophila Summary for Maine Berry Growers

February 25th, 2014 10:59 AM

2013 Spotted Wing Drosophila Summary for Maine Berry Growers

David Handley, Vegetable & Small Fruit Specialist
James Dill, Pest Management Specialist

The spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii) is an insect invasive to Maine that was first captured here in the fall of 2011.  Based on crop damage in other parts of the country and our own experience in 2012, we know that this insect poses a serious threat to most of the soft fruit crops we grow here, including raspberry, blackberry, blueberry and strawberry. During the summer of 2013 the University of Maine Cooperative Extension Pest Management Program set up drosophila traps in berry fields around the southern, central and coastal regions of the state to monitor the presence and activity of this insect.

drosophila trap

Drosophila Trap, photo by David Handley

The traps were 16 oz. red plastic cups with 30, 1/8” holes punched under the rim to allow the flies access.  A 1/2” wide band of black was painted just under the rim of the cup to increase its visual attractiveness.  The cups were topped with a tight fitting plastic lid and mounted on 4’ tomato stakes fitted with 4” hose clamps to act as a cup holder.  Four to six ounces of bait/killing solution (a mixture of cider vinegar and alcohol) was poured into each trap. A 60 ml plastic specimen cup containing a second bait consisting of water, sugar, flour and yeast was then placed within the trap to further increase its attractiveness.    We placed traps either within the crops or in a wooded area near the crops, knowing the insect prefers humid, shaded areas.   We emptied the traps weekly and restocked them with fresh bait.  The insects captured in the traps were brought back to our lab at Highmoor Farm in Monmouth to be identified.  Many different species are attracted to these traps and proper identification, while time consuming, is essential.  As populations increased we informed growers through our IPM newsletter, blog and webpage, hoping to keep the pest as well managed as possible throughout the summer.

In 2013, the first spotted wing drosophila were caught in Warren and Wells on July 19. With the exception of trapping sites in Warren and Bowdoinham, captures were very low, just a few flies per trap, and scattered, most sites having no flies, until the third week of August.   At that point we began catching low numbers of flies at nearly all locations, including Wells, Limington, Limerick, Springvale, Cape Elizabeth, New Gloucester, Poland Spring, Mechanic Falls, Wales, Livermore, Bowdoinham, and Dresden. Traps in wild blueberry fields in Hancock and Washington counties were also catching flies at this point, but also in low numbers.  By the end of August, our Monmouth, Farmington and Oxford sites had also captured flies.  Trap captures generally remained low (0 to 20 flies/trap) with occasional small flare ups (20 to 100 flies/trap) until the first week of September.  At that point numbers rose fairly consistently in nearly all locations, with weekly trap counts ranging from just a few flies to nearly 1,000. Raspberry and blueberry fruit infested with the small white larvae were being reported.  The highest numbers of flies continued to be found in the most southern and coastal sites.  By the end of October many sites were catching flies well into the thousands (14,000 during one week in Limerick) while some caught only a few flies. At this point flies were readily visible around ripe fruit in many fields and larvae were found infesting most of the fruit in any plantings that had not been sprayed.   At the end of the season we found that a trap maintained for us by a grower in Caribou had caught three flies.

Similar to the 2012 season, growers using insecticides to control spotted wing drosophila found that weekly sprays appeared to provide adequate control when populations remained relatively low (0-10 flies/per week). However, as fly populations expanded, growers found that twice weekly sprays were needed to keep larvae out of the fruit.  Growers used Entrust®, Delegate®, Brigade®, Bifenthrin®, Hero®, Mustang Max®, and/or malathion insecticides, and most found that these products usually offered adequate control if applied on a frequent basis.  Growers who did not apply pesticides saw near total crop loss, following the arrival of spotted wing drosophila in their fields.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap Captures 2013

Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap Captures 2013 (Excel)

Spotted wing drosophila trap catches remained relatively high throughout the remainder of the season, with dips in late September and early November, which may correlate with dry periods. As in 2012, the highest trap catches occurred late in the season, well after most of the crops had been harvested or lost to frost.  The lack of food likely make the traps more attractive, at least partially accounting for the increased catch, but this reiterates that high numbers of flies survive long after killing frosts have occurred.   By the end of November, populations finally dropped significantly, suggesting that the flies were now entering the over-wintering stage.

Spotted wing drosophila overwinter as adults (flies).  Any time the air temperatures exceed 45ºF for more than a few hours, it is likely that some adults will start becoming active.  The winter of 2013-14 has been one of the coldest in recent memory, and it will be interesting to see how well the flies come through it.  However, it would be unwise to assume that we will not be seeing many flies this summer because of the cold winter.  In its native Asia, it survives cold winters well.  Additionally, any storm fronts moving into Maine from the south could carry with it flies from southern states where the winter has not been so harsh.   Thus, berry growers should anticipate needing to manage drosophila for the 2014 season.  Based on our 2012 and 2013 experience, we believe it will be unlikely to significantly infest crops until relatively late in the season when populations reach damaging levels (late August in 2013 at some sites). Therefore, earlier ripening crops such as June-bearing strawberries should not be significantly impacted; but later ripening crops such as fall fruiting raspberries, late ripening varieties of blueberries and fall strawberries will need to be protected as soon as fruit begin to ripen.  We plan to monitor drosophila populations in Maine again in 2014, and carry out research on improving our trapping strategies to provide an early warning system in the future.

Based on what we know so far about this pest, here are six rules for managing spotted wing drosophila.

  1. Monitor for the flies with traps, and for the larvae in fruit.
  2. Spray regularly and often once flies have been found in the field (1-2/week).
  3. Harvest fruit regularly and often; do not leave any ripe/rotten fruit in the field.
  4. Sort fruit at harvest; do not leave any soft fruit in the container to be sold.
  5. Chill all fruit immediately after harvest to 38ºF (or as close as you can) for at least 12 hours to slow development of any eggs or larvae.
  6. Prune the planting to open up the canopy and create dry, light conditions.

Please follow our blog providing regular updates of spotted wing drosophila trapping data and management strategies during the growing season, where you can sign up for notifications of updates.

David T. Handley
Vegetable & Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Ave
Monmouth, ME  04259        Orono, ME  04473
207.933.2100                          1.800.287.0279

 

IPM Web Pages:

http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information.  No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients.  Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions.  Users of these products assume all associated risks.

Tree Fruit Preseason Meeting on March 5, 2014

February 13th, 2014 12:31 PM

Apples

Tree Fruit Preseason Meeting

Wednesday, March 5, 2014
8:00 AM to 4:00 PM
USM Lewiston-Auburn College, Room 170
51 Westminster Street, Lewiston, Maine 04240
Registration fee:  $20.00 per person, or $25 per person on the day of the meeting.

To register, contact Glen Koehler  at glen.koehler@maine.edu or call 207.581.3882.

Everyone is welcome to attend.  This meeting will provide pest and horticultural management updates for commercial, hobbyist, large and small-scale orchardists. Three pesticide applicator recertification credits will be offered for attending from 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Registration cost includes lunch and is $20 per person for those who preregister, or $25 per person on the day of the event. Preregistration is requested to ensure an accurate lunch count and to minimize registration time on the day of the meeting.

AGENDA

OPTIONAL PRE-MEETING PRESENTATION

8:00 AM   How Climate Change Works and Observed Changes in Maine Weather
- Glen Koehler, UMaine Cooperative Extension, Pest Management Office

9:00 AM   Coffee and donuts, meet and greet — Provided by Milton Sinclair, Paris Farmers Union

REGULAR MEETING

9:30 AM   Groundcover Management
- William Lord, University of New Hampshire

10:30 AM   Break — Provided by Randy Drown, Crop Protection Services

10:45 AM   Changing Weather in Maine
- Glen Koehler

11:15 AM   Calcium Nutrition and Physiology
- Renae Moran, UMaine Cooperative Extension, Highmoor Farm Agricultural Experiment Station

11:45 AM   Understanding Nutrient Recommendations
- Bruce Hoskins, University of Maine Analytical Lab and Maine Soil Testing Service

12:15 PM   Lunch

1:00 PM   Maine State Pomological Society Update
- Andy Ricker, Ricker Hill Orchards, Turner, Maine

1:15 PM   Climate Risk Reduction and Opportunities for Maine Tree Fruit Growers
- Glen Koehler

2:15 PM   Growing them is Easy… What Makes for Grower Success?
- William Lord

2:45 PM   Break — Provided by Paul Peters, Northeast Agricultural Sales, Inc.

3:00 PM   Insect and Disease Pest Management Update
- Glen Koehler

3:30 PM   Maine Board of Pesticides Control Update
- Gary Fish, Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry

4:00 PM   Adjourn

Sponsors

  • Crop Protections Services
  • Northeast Agricultural Sales, Inc.
  • Paris Farmers Union
  • University of Maine Cooperative Extension
  • University of Maine Highmoor Farm Agricultural Experiment Station

Any person with a disability who needs accommodations for this program should contact Glen Koehler at 207.581.3882 to discuss their needs at least seven days in advance, or at 1.800.287.8957 (voice and TDD).

Directions

Travelling North on I-95:
Take Exit 80. Turn left at the light at the end of the exit, and then take your first right onto Lisbon Street (Rt. 196) headed for Lisbon Falls. Turn left at the second stop light (Maine Public Broadcasting will be on your left) onto Westminster Street. The campus is towards the top of the hill on the right, after Ryder Truck.

Travelling South on I-95:
Take Exit 80. Bear right coming off the exit to get onto Lisbon Street (Rt. 196) headed for Lisbon Falls. About 100 meters after you get onto Lisbon Street, you will cross Pleasant Street. After another 100 meters, turn left onto Westminster Street. (Maine Public Broadcasting will be on your left.) Travel about 0.3 miles and the campus is towards the top of the hill on the right, after Ryder Truck.

Fruit Tree Class at Highmoor Farm – April 12, 2014

February 10th, 2014 2:03 PM

THIS CLASS IS FILLED.

What:
This class on growing fruit trees in Maine will focus on pruning, and dealing with diseases and insect pests. The workshop is free of charge, but please preregister by calling Renae Moran at 207.933.2100 or email rmoran@maine.edu.

Who:
This class is for those from the general public who would like to learn more about the cultural requirements of fruit trees, in particular pruning, insect pests and diseases. The class will be taught by Renae Moran, Tree Fruit Specialist for the University of Maine.

When: Saturday, April 12, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Please dress for an outdoor class. If the day turns out to be rainy, the class will be held indoors.

Apple tree at Highmoor Farm; photo by Edwin Remsberg

Where:
Highmoor Farm, UMaine Agricultural Experiment Station
52 US Route
202, Monmouth, Maine 04259
Tel. 207.933.2100

The class will begin in the meeting room behind the barn. If weather permits, we will have a pruning demonstration in the orchard and a tour of our fruit tree research orchards.

Directions

Traveling North on I-95:  Take Exit 75 off the Maine Turnpike in Auburn (left turn off the exit ramp).  Go through Lewiston and travel east 17.9 miles on Route 202.  Highmoor Farm is on your right.

Traveling South on I-95:  Take Exit 109B off I-95 in Augusta and travel west on Route 202 for 15.7 miles.  Highmoor Farm is on your left.

For more information, contact Renae Moran at 207.933.2100 or email rmoran@maine.edu.

If you are a person with a disability and will need any accommodations to participate in this class, please call Pam St. Peter at 207.933.2100 to discuss your needs, TDD 1-800-287-8957 (in Maine).   Please contact us at least one week prior to this event to assure fullest possible attention to your needs.

Pruning Fruit Trees Class – April 5, 2014

January 17th, 2014 11:53 AM

Pruning Fruit Trees Class

pruning a fruit tree

Saturday, April 5, 2014
10:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Highmoor Farm, UMaine Agricultural Experiment Station
52 US Route 202, Monmouth, Maine 04259
Registration Fee:  $9.00
Preregistration is required through MSAD #11 Adult Education.
Course ID:  6200.01.0.314.51.106501

Register online or contact Diann Bailey at dbailey@msad11.org or 207.582.3774 to preregister.

The Pruning Fruit Trees class will cover basic pruning techniques for apple, pear, peach and cherry trees and will include a demonstration as well as an opportunity for hands-on learning. The class will be taught by Renae Moran, Tree Fruit Specialist for the University of Maine. It will be held outdoors at the University of Maine Highmoor Farm in Monmouth. Students should meet in the parking lot behind the barn.

Please contact Renae Moran for more information about the class at 207.933.2100 or rmoran@maine.edu.

Directions

Traveling North on I-95:  Take Exit 75 off the Maine Turnpike in Auburn (left turn off the exit ramp).  Go through Lewiston and travel east 17.9 miles on Route 202.  Highmoor Farm will be on your right.

Traveling South on I-95:  Take Exit 109B off I-95 in Augusta and travel west 15.7 miles on Route 202.  Highmoor Farm will be on your left.

Fruit Tree Class at Highmoor Farm – February 15, 2014

January 16th, 2014 2:24 PM

Please note:  This class is filled.

What:
This half-day workshop on the basics of growing fruit trees will focus on growing apples for commercial sale.  This class will cover pruning, fertilizers, fruit thinning, insect pests, diseases and spraying.  If weather permits, we will have a pruning demonstration in the orchard. The class is free of charge, but please preregister by contacting Renae Moran at 207.933.2100 X105 or rmoran@maine.edu.

AGENDA

10:00 AM Welcome and Introductions
10:10 AM What to Expect When Growing Apple and Other Tree Fruits
10:30 AM Fruit Thinning
11:00 AM Break
11:15 AM Nutrition and Fertilizing
11:45 AM Harvest Management with Stop Drops
12:00 PM Lunch
1:00 PM Insect Pests and Diseases
2:00 PM Spraying
2:30 PM Pruning

Who:
This class is for people who would like to learn more about the cultural requirements of fruit trees, in particular pruning, insect pests and diseases.  The class will be taught by Renae Moran, Tree Fruit Specialist for the University of Maine.

When: Saturday, February 15, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM
There will be a one-hour break at noon, so bring a lunch.  Snacks and drinks will be provided.

Highmoor Farm Sign

Where:
Highmoor Farm, UMaine Agricultural Experiment Station
52 US Route
202, Monmouth, Maine 04259
Tel. 207.933.2100

The class will begin in the meeting room behind the barn.

Directions

Traveling North on I-95:  Take Exit 75 off the Maine Turnpike in Auburn (left turn off the exit ramp).  Go through Lewiston and travel east 17.9 miles on Route 202.  Highmoor Farm will be on your right.

Traveling South on I-95:  Take Exit 109B off I-95 in Augusta and travel west 15.7 miles on Route 202.  Highmoor Farm will be on your left.

For more information, contact Renae Moran at 207.933.2100 or email rmoran@maine.edu.

If you are a person with a disability and will need any accommodations to participate in this class, please call Pam St. Peter at 207.933.2100 to discuss your needs, TDD 1-800-287-8957 (in Maine).   Please contact us at least one week prior to this event to assure fullest possible attention to your needs.

 

Maine Vegetable and Fruit School 2014

January 15th, 2014 8:56 AM

University of Maine Cooperative Extension Highmoor FarmThe day-long school is offered on two dates at two locations: March 10 in Portland or March 11 in Bangor.  Preregistration is required.  Registration cost is $35 and includes lunch. Please register by February 21, 2014.

Print a registration form (PDF)

Maine Vegetable and Fruit School is hosted by

  • University of Maine Cooperative Extension
  • Maine Vegetable & Small Fruit Growers Association

Monday, March 10, 2014
SEASONS CONFERENCE CENTER

155 Riverside Street, Portland, Maine 04103
Tel. 207.775.6336

Tuesday, March 11, 2014
BANGOR MOTOR INN CONFERENCE CENTER

701 Hogan Road, Bangor, Maine 04401
Tel. 207.947.0355 or 1.800.244.0355

 

AGENDA – March 10 and March 11, 2014

8:30 AM REGISTRATION
9:00 AM Legislative Update: Pesticide Application, Certification and More…
      — Maine Board of Pesticides Control
9:30 AM Think Before You Spread – Fertilizer Applications for Long Term Impacts
      — Dr. Eric Sideman and Mark Hutchinson
10:00 AM Soil Fertility Planning at Laughingstock Farm
      — Lisa Turner
10:30 AM BREAK
10:45 AM Compost for High Tunnel Tomatoes
      — Kate Marshall
11:30 AM Soil Conditioning with Wood Chips
      — Dr. Suzanne Morse
12:00 PM LUNCH
1:00 PM Food Safety Modernization Act: Potential Impacts on Your Farm
     — Heather Bryant
1:30 PM Farm Food Safety Discussion: Do I Really Have To?
      — Dr. Jason Bolton, Linda Titus and Heather Bryant
2:00 PM BREAK
2:15 PM What’s New and What’s Best for Potatoes?
      — Dr. John Jemison
2:45 PM A Pumpkin Disease Spray Program – Putting the Pieces Together
      — Dr. Mark Hutton
3:15 PM Innovative Strawberry Growing Practices
      — Dr. David Handley
3:45 PM WRAP-UP & EVALUATION

Speakers

Jason Bolton – Food Safety Specialist, University of Maine Cooperative Extension
Heather Bryant – Field Specialist, University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension
Dr. David Handley – Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist, UMaine Cooperative Extension
Mark Hutchinson – Extension Professor, University of Maine Cooperative Extension
Dr. Mark Hutton – Vegetable Specialist, University of Maine Cooperative Extension
Dr. John Jemison – Water Quality and Soil Specialist, UMaine Cooperative Extension
Kate Marshall – Graduate Student, University of Maine
Dr. Suzanne Morse – Professor of Applied Botany, College of the Atlantic, Bar Harbor, Maine
Dr. Eric Sideman – Organic Crop Specialist, Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association
Linda Titus – Coordinator, GAP/GHP Advisory Program, AgMatters
Ralph Turner – Laughingstock Farm, Durham, Maine

Thank you to Northeast Agricultural Sales, Inc. for sponsoring our morning break.


Participants may receive 2.0 Pesticide Applicator recertification credits for attending.  Certified Crop Advisors may earn 5.0 recertification credits for participation.


For more information about this or other workshops, please contact:

Mark Hutchinson, Extension Educator
University of Maine Cooperative Extension
Knox – Lincoln Counties
377 Manktown Road
Waldoboro, ME 04572-5815
Tel. 207.832.0343 or 1.800.244.2104 (in Maine).
mhutch@maine.edu  


Any person with a disability who needs accommodations to participate in this program should contact Mark Hutchinson at 1.800.244.2104, or 1.800.287.8957 (TDD) to discuss any needed arrangements at least seven days in advance.

 

 

UMaine Cooperative Extension High Tunnel Workshop – January 9, 2014

December 18th, 2013 7:07 AM

High Tunnel Workshop 2014

High Tunnel Tomatoes

High Tunnel Tomatoes, photo by Danielle Murray

Thursday, January 9, 2014
9:30 AM to 3:30 PM
Arnold/Howard Rooms, Augusta Civic Center, Augusta, Maine
Registration Fee:  $20.00, includes book

Preregistration is strongly encouraged. Please preregister by January 3, 2014.

Register online or contact Pam St. Peter at pamela.stpeter@maine.edu or 207.933.2100 to preregister.

Cost for registration is $20.00 per person. Checks are to be made payable to UMaine Cooperative Extension.

This workshop is designed to help people who are interested in using high tunnels for vegetable and fruit production as part of a commercial enterprise. Interest in growing crops in high tunnels is expanding as demand for locally grown produce expands and people seek to extend their growing season. Types of tunnels, construction, irrigation, fertility, and crop requirements will be discussed with Dr. Mark Hutton, Vegetable Specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension and a panel of experts and growers who have worked with high tunnels in Maine.

The workshop will be held at the Augusta Civic Center during the Maine Agricultural Trades Show, which runs January 7-9, so participants will have an opportunity to come early and spend some time looking at the supplies, equipment and services on exhibit that are available to help them with high tunnels and other agricultural enterprises. Admission to the Trades Show is free.

A registration fee of $20.00 will be charged for participation in the High Tunnel Workshop and space is limited, so preregistration is strongly advised. Participants will be provided with the publication “High Tunnel Tomato Production” from the University of Missouri for an excellent reference companion to the workshop. Cash and checks will be accepted at the registration table; checks should be made out to “UMaine Cooperative Extension.”

AGENDA

9:30 AM Why High Tunnels? Understanding the Potential and Limitations
Caragh Fitzgerald, Extension Educator, UMaine Extension
10:00 AM Design Options
Caragh Fitzgerald
10:30 AM Site Selection and Preparation
Mark Hutchinson, Extension Educator, UMaine Extension
11:00 AM Construction Tips
Richard Kersbergen, Extension Educator, UMaine Extension
11:30 PM My High Tunnels
Dave Colson, Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association
12:00 PM LUNCH BREAK (on your own)
1:00 PM Irrigation Design and Use
Mark Hutton, Vegetable Specialist, UMaine Extension
1:30 PM Soil Fertility Management
Mark Hutchinson
2:00 PM Tomatoes in High Tunnels
Mark Hutton
2:30 PM Other Vegetables
Mark Hutton
3:00 PM Fruit in High Tunnels
David Handley, Vegetable & Small Fruit Specialist, UMaine Extension
3:30 PM Adjourn


Any person with a disability who needs accommodations to participate in this program should contact Pam St. Peter at 207.933.2100 to discuss any needed arrangements at least seven days in advance.

 

 

New England Vegetable and Fruit Conference – December 17-19, 2013

November 18th, 2013 10:33 AM

New England Vegetable and Fruit Conference and Trade Show
Tuesday through Thursday, December 17-19, 2013
Radisson Hotel in Manchester, New Hampshire

The New England Vegetable and Fruit (NEVF) Conference will include more than 25 educational sessions over 3 days, covering major vegetable, berry and tree fruit crops as well as various special topics. A Farmer to Farmer meeting after each morning and afternoon session will bring speakers and farmers together for informal, in-depth discussion on certain issues. There is also an extensive Trade Show with over 100 exhibitors.

The conference is put together with close collaboration between growers and Cooperative Extension from across the region. This is a great opportunity to meet with fellow growers, advisors, researchers, and industry representatives.

For more information and to register, please visit the NEVF Conference website, www.newenglandvfc.org.

Hutton Talks about Pumpkin Crop in Press Herald Blog

October 29th, 2013 8:43 AM

Mark Hutton, a vegetable specialist and associate professor of vegetable crops with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, spoke about Maine’s pumpkin crop in the latest entry of the Portland Press Herald blog “The Root: Dispatches from Maine’s food sources.” Hutton said overall it was a pretty good year for pumpkin production in Maine despite excessive rainfall.