Spotted Wing Drosophila Update: 8/29/2014

August 29th, 2014 2:53 PM

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: AUGUST 29, 2014

Click on photo to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable & Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) captures continue to rise in most of our trapping locations this week, leading to some of the highest numbers we’ve seen this year. The highest SWD captures occurred in Wales and Bowdoinham where, for the first time this season, we have caught over 100 SWD in a week. Gray, Dresden, Turner, Limington, Monmouth and Poland Spring also had fairly high counts (more than 10). Based on what we know about this insect so far, if more than 3 flies are caught in a single week, or more than one fly is caught over two or more consecutive weeks, a regular spray schedule (about every 7 days) is recommended to protect any ripening fruit in that location. If SWD captures continue to increase or any larvae are found in fruit, a 5-day spray schedule would be recommended. We have started finding raspberry fruit infested with SWD larvae in some fields where overripe fruit was prevalent or the planting had not yet been sprayed.

Insects in Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap

Insects in Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap, Male SWD Circled, photo by Kaytlin Woodman

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 8/29/14
Springvale 0
Limington 11
Limerick 0
Wells 3
Cape Elizabeth 4
Buxton 1
Gray 57
Bowdoinham 163
Dresden 20
Warren 0
Oxford 0
Farmington 8
Livermore Falls 1
Mechanic Falls 0
Poland Spring 10
Turner 20
Monmouth 13
Wales 250
Fayette 0
Burnham 3
Thorndike 6

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 10 – August 29, 2014

August 29th, 2014 11:47 AM

Sweet CornSweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 10 – August 29, 2014

Click on photos to enlarge.

PEST PRESSURE MODERATE IN MOST LOCATIONS

Highest Threat Remains in Most Southern and Coastal Regions

SITUATION
A brief warm spell pushed late season corn development this week, but more cool weather on the way should slow growth and pest pressure over the next few days. Crop quality continues to be very good, and insect pressure continues to be fairly moderate as we begin to wrap up another corn season. Next week’s newsletter will be the last issue planned for this season.

European Corn Borer Larva on Ear

European Corn Borer Larva on Ear, photo by David Handley

European corn borer: Most trapping sites caught corn borer moths this week, but numbers vary greatly by location. These moths will continue to threaten any fresh silking corn remaining in fields that are not on a spray schedule for corn earworm. Farmington, New Gloucester, Nobleboro, Oxford, Poland Spring, Sabattus, Wales and Warren were over the threshold of 5 moths per week in silking corn. The New Gloucester, Oxford, Poland Spring and Sabattus sites were not on spray regimes for corn earworm, so silk sprays were recommended. European corn borer feeding damage in pre-tassel corn was not over the 15% threshold in the few locations with young corn remaining.

Corn earworm: Corn earworm moth counts were lower in most sites this week. Cool evening weather will probably keep activity low over the next few days. A 4-day spray interval was recommended for corn earworm on silking fields in Cape Elizabeth and one Lewiston site. A 5-day spray interval was recommended in Levant, Wales, Warren and one Dayton site. A 6-day spray interval was recommended in Charleston, Nobleboro and Palmyra.

Fall armyworm: Moth captures were erratic this week; with many sites catching no moths while others had very high counts. Feeding damage from larvae was also not as prevalent this week, although there are only a few fields left that are not yet in silk. Fields in Cape Elizabeth, Dayton, Monmouth, New Gloucester, Nobleboro, and Wales exceeded the threshold of 3 moths per week in silking corn. However, only the Monmouth and New Gloucester sites were not on a spray regime for corn earworm. Fall armyworm feeding damage did not exceed the 15% threshold in any of the sites with pre-silking corn remaining.

Rust on Corn

Rust on Corn, photo by David Handley

Corn Rust: We found several fields showing symptoms of corn rust this week. This fungus disease causes reddish-brown pustules to form on the leaves, stalks and husks. When the spores get spread over the husks, it can diminish the visual quality of the ears. A fungicide spray for rust is only recommended when infection occurs prior to tassel. Later infections are unlikely to cause enough damage to justify control measures.

When Should You Stop Spraying?
When a silking cornfield is under a recommended spray interval for corn earworm, spraying may be stopped once the silks have become thoroughly dried and brown. However, if earworm pressure is very high (e.g. 91+ moths/week) and/or fall armyworm moths are over threshold (3+ moths per week), then spraying should continue until either the moth counts drop, or you reach the required days before harvest (dh) for the product being used.

Sincerely,

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Sweet Corn IPM Weekly Scouting Summary

Location CEW
Moths
ECB
Moths
FAW
Moths
%Feeding
Damage
Recommendations / Comments
Bowdoinham 1 0 1 13% No spray recommended
Cape Elizabeth I 21 0 0 1 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Cape Elizabeth II 70 2 30 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Charleston 3 1 0 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Corinth 2 0 0 0% 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Dayton 4 2 3 2% 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Farmington 0 9 0 One spray recommended for ECB on silking corn
Levant 7 1 0 0% 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Lewiston I 1 1 0 8% No spray recommended
Lewiston II 13 0 0 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Monmouth 0 2 12 One spray recommended for FAW on silking corn
New Gloucester 1 5 21 12% One spray recommended for ECB+FAW on silking corn
Nobleboro 3 11 4 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Oxford 0 6 0 One spray recommended for ECB on silking corn
Palmyra 3 3 0 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Poland Spring 1 8 0 One spray recommended for ECB on silking corn
Sabattus 0 28 0 One spray recommended for ECB on silking corn
Wales 6 5 4 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Warren 7 13 2 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Wayne 0 0 1 6% No spray recommended
Wells I 0 0 0 1% No spray recommended
Wells II 1 1 2 0% No spray recommended

CEW: Corn earworm (Only fresh silking corn should be sprayed for this insect.)
ECB: European corn borer
FAW: Fall armyworm

Corn Earworm Spray Thresholds for Pheromone Traps

Moths caught per week Moths caught per night Spray interval
0.0 to 1.4 0.0 to 0.2 No spray
1.5 to 3.5 0.3 to 0.5 Spray every 6 days
3.6 to 7.0 0.6 to 1.0 Spray every 5 days
7.1 to 91 1.1 to 13.0 Spray every 4 days
More than 91 More than 13 Spray every 3 days

Thresholds apply only to corn with exposed fresh silk. Lengthen spray intervals by one day if maximum daily temperature is less than 80°F.

European Corn Borer Thresholds
Whorl stage: 30% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Pre-tassel-silk: 15% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Silk: 5 or more moths caught in pheromone traps in one week.

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Growing Fruit Trees in Maine Class – October 23, 2104

August 29th, 2014 9:40 AM

Growing Fruit Trees in Maine Class

ApplesThursday, October 23, 2014
6:00 PM to 8:30 PM
Gardiner Area High School, Room 123
40 West Hill Road, Gardiner, Maine 04345
Registration Fee: $10.00 for adults. Children may attend free of charge.
Preregistration is required through MSAD #11 Adult Education.
Course ID: 6200.09.0.21.215.51.113457

Register online or contact Diann Bailey at dbailey@msad11.org or 207.582.3774 to preregister.

Come and sample a variety of apples in this class that covers the cultural requirements of fruit trees with a focus on apples, plums and peaches. Learn about grafting, types of dwarf trees, cross pollination needs, and the basics of pruning. The class will be taught by Renae Moran, Tree Fruit Specialist for the University of Maine. It will be held at Gardiner Area High School. The registration fee is $10.00 for adults and children may attend free of charge.

Please contact Renae Moran for more information about the class at 207.933.2100, ext. 105 or rmoran@maine.edu.

 

Moran Talks with MPBN About Maine Apple Crop

August 25th, 2014 1:42 PM

Renae Moran, a tree fruit specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, spoke to the Maine Public Broadcasting Network about this year’s apple crop in Maine. According to the report, experts are predicting an excellent crop this year, with good size and color. Moran said most people who pick their own apples will not see much hail damage, and added most apple farms in Maine get a significant portion of their incomes from pick-your-own and retail farm stand sales. Moran said pick-your-own has started in southern Maine with summer varieties. Activity usually picks up after Labor Day, when the main crop harvest begins the second week in September in southern Maine and continues into October in more northern areas, she said.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Update: 8/22/2014

August 22nd, 2014 2:36 PM

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: AUGUST 22, 2014

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable & Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) captures increased significantly in most of our trapping locations this week, although two locations (Warren and Mechanic Falls) caught no flies. Highest SWD captures occurred in Gray, Wales, Bowdoinham, Turner, Dresden and Farmington. Captures of any more than one fly in two consecutive weeks would be cause to recommend a spray to protect any ripening fruit in that location. If you have caught more than one SWD fly in a trap over a week and there is ripe or soon to be ripe fruit present, a regular spray schedule (about every 7 days) is recommended. If SWD captures continue to increase or any larvae are found in fruit, then a 5-day spray schedule would be recommended.

Other New England states have also been reporting increases in spotted wing drosophila infestations, so we expect the trend to continue over the next few weeks.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Larva in Blackberry

SWD Larvae in Blackberry, photo by David Handley

Town Spotted wing drosophila weekly trap catch 8/21/14
Springvale 1
Limington 2
Limerick 1
Wells 1
Cape Elizabeth 1
Buxton 1
Gray 45
Bowdoinham 24
Dresden 13
Warren 0
Oxford 2
Farmington 11
Livermore Falls 2
Mechanic Falls 0
Turner 15
Monmouth 2
Wales 32
Fayette 3
Burnham 2
Thorndike 2

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                              491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                            1.800.287.0279

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 9 – August 22, 2014

August 22nd, 2014 11:41 AM

Sweet CornSweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 9 – August 22, 2014

Click on photos to enlarge.

CORN EARWORM NUMBERS INCREASING

Highest Threat in Southern Coastal Region

SITUATION
Cooler days and nights have slowed later corn development, but supply and quality still seems to be good. There has been a significant increase in pest activity, but for the moment it is fairly localized in the southern coastal region.

European corn borer: We continue to catch moths in most locations. Although, with the exception of our Sabattus site, the counts are fairly low. It appears that a second generation of corn borer is underway, which could threaten silking corn in fields that are not on a spray schedule for corn earworm. Biddeford, North Berwick, Sabattus, and Warren were over the threshold of 5 moths per week in silking corn. Only the North Berwick site was not also on a spray regime for corn earworm, so a spray was recommended there. European corn borer feeding damage in pre-tassel corn was over the 15% threshold in North Berwick, Biddeford, Cape Elizabeth, Poland Spring and Wayne this week.

Corn earworm: Corn earworm moth counts jumped higher in some sites this week, most notably in the southern coastal region. A 4-day spray interval was recommended for corn earworm on silking fields in Biddeford, Cape Elizabeth, Garland, Wales and one Wells site. A 5-day spray interval was recommended in Monmouth and one Dayton site. A 6-day spray interval was recommended in Farmington, Levant, one Lewiston site, Sabattus, Warren and Wayne.

Corn Earworm Feeding on Corn

Corn Earworm Feeding on Corn, photo by David Handley

Fall Armyworm Injury on Corn Leaves

Fall Armyworm Injury on Corn Leaves, photo by David Handley

Fall armyworm: Most trapping sites had few, if any moths this week, although feeding damage from larvae has increased in some fields. Fields in Biddeford, Cape Elizabeth, Farmington, Monmouth, Nobleboro, and one Wells site exceeded the threshold of 3 moths per week in silking corn. However, only the Nobleboro site was not on a spray regime for corn earworm. Fall armyworm feeding damage on plants exceeded the 15% damage threshold alone, or in combination with European corn borer feeding, in Biddeford, Dayton and Warren this week.

Aphids on corn

Aphids on Corn, photo by Kaytlin Woodman

Corn leaf aphids may infest corn plants in fields that have not recently been sprayed for other pests. Colonies of these small, bluish-green insects can nearly cover the tassels, stalks and husks. The waste aphids excrete on the plants, called “honeydew” stimulates the development of sooty mold fungus. This dark, slimy fungus can coat the surface of the husks, greatly reducing the visual appearance of the ears. Sprays applied for corn earworm will usually also control aphids. A spray for aphids would only be recommended if sooty mold is becoming a problem.

Pesticide disposal: This October, the Maine Board of Pesticides Control (BPC) and the Maine Department of Environmental Protection will offer free disposal of banned or unusable pesticides. Collection will occur at sites located in Presque Isle, Bangor, Augusta and Portland. To qualify, people must register by September 26, 2014. Registration is mandatory; drop-ins will not be permitted. To register or get details and important information about the temporary storage and transportation of obsolete pesticides, go to the BPC web site at http://www.thinkfirstspraylast.org and click on Obsolete Pesticide Collection, or call 207-287-2731.

Sincerely,

David T. Handley
Vegetable & Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Sweet Corn IPM Weekly Scouting Summary

Location CEW
Moths
ECB
Moths
FAW
Moths
%Feeding
Damage
Recommendations / Comments
Biddeford 35 5 3 36% 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Cape Elizabeth I 72 4 0 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Cape Elizabeth II 67 4 9 29% 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Charleston 0 1 0 No spray recommended
Dayton I 0 0 0 No spray recommended
Dayton II 4 3 0 29% 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Farmington 2 1 4 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Garland 9 0 0 1% 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Levant 2 0 0 2% 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Lewiston I 2 3 0 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Lewiston II 0 4 0 7% No spray recommended
Monmouth 5 3 10 0% 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Nobleboro 0 2 4 One spray recommended for FAW on silking corn
No. Berwick 0 6 1 25% One spray recommended for ECB on silking corn
Oxford 0 2 0 3% No spray recommended
Palmyra 0 0 0 No spray recommended
Poland Spring 0 0 0 6% No spray recommended
Sabattus 3 29 0 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Wales 11 1 1 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Warren 2 10 2 37% 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Wayne 3 1 0 27% 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Wells I 1 0 1 0% No spray recommended
Wells II 15 3 4 11% 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn

CEW: Corn earworm (Only fresh silking corn should be sprayed for this insect.)
ECB: European corn borer
FAW: Fall armyworm

Corn Earworm Spray Thresholds for Pheromone Traps

Moths caught per week Moths caught per night Spray interval
0.0 to 1.4 0.0 to 0.2 No spray
1.5 to 3.5 0.3 to 0.5 Spray every 6 days
3.6 to 7.0 0.6 to 1.0 Spray every 5 days
7.1 to 91 1.1 to 13.0 Spray every 4 days
More than 91 More than 13 Spray every 3 days

Thresholds apply only to corn with exposed fresh silk. Lengthen spray intervals by one day if maximum daily temperature is less than 80°F.

European Corn Borer Thresholds
Whorl stage: 30% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Pre-tassel-silk: 15% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Silk: 5 or more moths caught in pheromone traps in one week.

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Update: 8/15/2014

August 18th, 2014 2:52 PM

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: 8/15/2014

Click on photo to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable & Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Spotted Wing Drosophila Larvae in Raspberry

Spotted Wing Drosophila Larvae in Raspberry, photo by David Handley

Although spotted wing drosophila captures remain relatively low through most of the state, we are finding the flies in more locations this week. We caught single flies in traps in Wells, Mechanic Falls, Springvale, Fayette and Wales. Two to six flies were caught in our traps in Limington, Gray, Cape Elizabeth, Turner, Bowdoinham, Dresden, Livermore Falls, Farmington, Monmouth, Thorndike, and Burnham. Although we have not yet caught more than six flies in a week at any site, any more than one fly in two consecutive weeks would be cause to recommend a spray to protect any ripening fruit in that location.

Recent weather fronts have been moving into Maine from the south. This may cause a sudden increase in spotted wing drosophila numbers, because we strongly suspect that the flies can travel up on storm fronts.

David T. Handley
Vegetable & Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                            1.800.287.0279

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 8 – August 15, 2014

August 18th, 2014 11:51 AM

Sweet CornSweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 8 – August 15, 2014

Click on photos to enlarge.

PEST NUMBERS INCREASE IN MOST FIELDS

Fall Armyworm, European Corn Borer Moth Counts Rising

SITUATION
The recent storm has caused lodging in some fields, but corn plants can often come back up if the roots have not been badly damaged. However, spraying and harvesting lodged corn can be difficult. The stream of weather coming up from the south will likely cause pest numbers to increase in the near future, although for this week we have only seen relatively moderate increases in fall armyworm and European corn borer moth captures. The latter may indicate that a second generation is now getting underway.

European corn borer: Moth counts were generally higher in most locations this week, although a few sites still had no moths in the traps. This increase in trap captures suggests that a second generation of corn borer may be underway and could threaten silking corn in fields that are not on a spray schedule for corn earworm. Sabattus, Farmington, Livermore Falls, Nobleboro, Oxford and Palmyra were over the threshold of 5 moths per week in silking corn. The Farmington and Palmyra sites were also on spray regimes for corn earworm, so no additional sprays should be needed there. European corn borer feeding damage in pre-tassel corn was over the 15% threshold in Biddeford, Cape Elizabeth, Dayton, Poland Spring and Warren this week.

European Corn Borer Larvae on Pre-tassel Stage Corn

European Corn Borer Larvae on Pre-tassel Stage Corn, photo by David Handley

Corn Earworm Larvae

Corn Earworm Larvae, photo by David Handley

Corn earworm: Corn earworm moth counts are rising in some locations, as we expect late in the season when more weather comes up from the south carrying moths with it. A 6-day spray interval was recommended for corn earworm on silking fields in Biddeford, one Dayton site, Farmington, Palmyra, Warren, and one Wells site. A 5-day spray interval was recommended for one Cape Elizabeth site, Charleston, one Dayton site, New Gloucester, and North Berwick. A 4-day spray interval was recommended at one Lewiston site.

Fall armyworm: Moth counts continue to be erratic around the state, but were significantly higher in some sites this week (nearly 100 moths in a Cape Elizabeth trap). Fields in Biddeford, Cape Elizabeth, Monmouth, Nobleboro, Wales, Warren and one Wells site exceeded the threshold of 3 moths per week in silking corn. However, only the Monmouth, Nobleboro and Wales sites were not on a spray regime for corn earworm. Fall armyworm feeding damage on plants was only noted in Cape Elizabeth this week, where it exceeded the 15% damage threshold.

Squash vine borer moths were caught in pheromone traps in Biddeford and Cape Elizabeth this week, but did not exceed the threshold of five moths per week. You can download a free copy of the University of New Hampshire’s new fact sheet, Managing Squash Vine Borer Problems in New Hampshire from their website.

Two Squash Vine Borer Moths

Two Squash Vine Borer Moths, photo by Jeffrey Hahn, Univ. of Minnesota Extension

Sap beetle on strawberry

Picnic Beetle (left) on Strawberry, photo by James Dill

Picnic beetles can become a problem during the late summer on silking corn. These beetles are about 1/4 inch long, black with orange spots. They can often be found on stalks and ears that are infested with European corn borer or fall armyworm, feeding on sap at an entry or exit hole. They are also known to feed on the silks. While this does little damage, customers may object to finding the insects in their bags. Sprays to control corn earworm should provide control of these beetles if they are found in your field.

Sincerely,

David T. Handley
Vegetable & Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Sweet Corn IPM Weekly Scouting Summary

Location CEW
Moths
ECB
Moths
FAW
Moths
%Feeding
Damage
Recommendations / Comments
Biddeford 2 0 5 22% 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Cape Elizabeth I 1 0 2 13% No spray recommended
Cape Elizabeth II 6 2 97 50% 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Charleston 5 4 0 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Dayton I 3 0 0 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Dayton II 6 0 1 38% 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Farmington 2 10 1 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Levant 1 3 0 3% No spray recommended
Lewiston I 9 3 0 0% 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Lewiston II 0 0 0 3% No spray recommended
Livermore Falls 1 5 1 0% One spray recommended for ECB on silking corn
Monmouth 0 4 18 One spray recommended for FAW on silking corn
New Gloucester 6 1 0 8% 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Nobleboro 1 35 8 One spray recommended for ECB+FAW on silking corn
No. Berwick 7 0 0 7% 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Oxford 1 7 2 2% One spray recommended for ECB on silking corn
Palmyra 2 6 0 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Sabattus 0 81 0 One spray recommended for ECB on silking corn
Wales 1 0 6 6% One spray recommended for FAW on silking corn
Warren 2 3 27 35% 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Wells I 0 0 0 4% No spray recommended
Wells II 2 1 3 4% 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn

CEW: Corn earworm (Only fresh silking corn should be sprayed for this insect.)
ECB: European corn borer
FAW: Fall armyworm

Corn Earworm Spray Thresholds for Pheromone Traps

Moths caught per week Moths caught per night Spray interval
0.0 to 1.4 0.0 to 0.2 No spray
1.5 to 3.5 0.3 to 0.5 Spray every 6 days
3.6 to 7.0 0.6 to 1.0 Spray every 5 days
7.1 to 91 1.1 to 13.0 Spray every 4 days
More than 91 More than 13 Spray every 3 days

Thresholds apply only to corn with exposed fresh silk. Lengthen spray intervals by one day if maximum daily temperature is less than 80°F.

European Corn Borer Thresholds
Whorl stage: 30% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Pre-tassel-silk: 15% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Silk: 5 or more moths caught in pheromone traps in one week.

IPM Web Pages:

http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Dill Quoted in AP Article on Berry Growers’ Fruit Fly Battles

August 11th, 2014 3:25 PM

James Dill, a pest management specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, was quoted in an Associated Press article about Northeast berry growers learning how to combat an invasive fruit fly — the tiny spotted-wing drosophila — that wiped out 80 percent of some farms’ late-season fruit two years ago. Growers in Maine, the country’s largest producer of wild blueberries, are spraying and harvesting sooner and planting earlier varieties, the article states. “You take a loss, but the loss is on green berries rather than having to put more pesticides out there,” Dill said. The Portland Press Herald, Yahoo! News and Fox Business carried the AP report.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Update: 8/8/2014

August 8th, 2014 2:49 PM

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: 8/8/2014

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable & Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Male and Female Spotted Wing Drosophila Flies

Male (left) and Female (right) Spotted Wing Drosophila, photo by Griffin Dill. Actual size: 2-3 mm.

Spotted wing drosophila captures remain low throughout most of the state this week. No flies were found at most of our trap sites. We caught single flies in traps in Levant, Limington, Buxton and Gray. We caught six flies in our Turner locations, the most we have caught in a single week this season, and enough that we would recommend a spray to protect any ripening fruit in that location. We have not yet had any reports of fruit infested with larvae. Other New England states continue to report captures of spotted wing drosophila in traps, but counts have been low.

If the population growth of spotted wing drosophila follows a similar trend as the past two years, we expect populations to start to build rapidly in the next two to three weeks. Check traps every couple of days for the spotted wings of the male flies. Start protective sprays on any berries that have begun to ripen once more than one spotted wing drosophila is caught in a trap in a week, or any larvae are noticed in the fruit. Look for fruit flies hovering around fruit and symptoms of premature fruit decay.

Products that provide good control of drosophila on berries include Delegate®, Brigade®, Bifenture®, Danitol®, Mustang Max®, malathion and Assail®. Check product labels for rates, post-harvest intervals and safety precautions. Keeping the fields clean of over-ripe and rotten fruit can also help reduce the incidence of this insect.

We have a new supply of the spotted wing drosophila fact sheet series from Pennsylvania State University covering, biology, identification and management. Contact us if you would like copies.

drosophila trap

Drosophila Trap, photo by David Handley

A simple monitoring trap for spotted wing drosophila:
The trap body is made from a 16 ounce red plastic cup (we use Solo Brand P16RLR). You’ll need one that has a tight fitting lid (we use Solo Brand 626TS). Using a 1/8” hole punch (available through art suppliers) punch about 15 holes in a row around the cup just under the lip about 1/2” apart. Leave about 2” of the diameter of the rim with no holes so that liquid can be poured in and out. Punch a second row of holes just under the first row, to give you a total of 30, 1/8” holes. Use a black permanent marker to paint a 1/2” wide black strip around the cup under the rim, right over the holes you punched. To support the trap, cut a wooden tomato stake down to about 30”. Attach a 4” or larger hose clamp near the top of the stake to act as a cup holder for the trap (we just punched a hole in the metal band of the hose clamp and attached it to the stake with a flat headed wood screw). Place the trap holder in a shady, moist place in or near the fruit planting, with the cup height about 18” off the ground. Fill the trap with 4 to 6 ounces of apple cider vinegar, water + sugar + yeast, or whatever bait you prefer. It is best to add a few drops of unscented soap to break the surface tension of the liquid. Place the lid on the cup to keep rain and critters from getting in, and place the trap in the holder. Adjust the hose clamp so that the trap fits in snugly but the trap holes are not covered up. Empty and re-bait the trap every week. Do not pour out the old bait on the ground near the trap, as this will draw flies away from it.

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                              491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.