Posts Tagged ‘Highmoor Farm’

Fruit Tree Class at Highmoor Farm – April 12, 2014

Monday, February 10th, 2014

THIS CLASS IS FILLED.

What:
This class on growing fruit trees in Maine will focus on pruning, and dealing with diseases and insect pests. The workshop is free of charge, but please preregister by calling Renae Moran at 207.933.2100 or email rmoran@maine.edu.

Who:
This class is for those from the general public who would like to learn more about the cultural requirements of fruit trees, in particular pruning, insect pests and diseases. The class will be taught by Renae Moran, Tree Fruit Specialist for the University of Maine.

When: Saturday, April 12, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Please dress for an outdoor class. If the day turns out to be rainy, the class will be held indoors.

Apple tree at Highmoor Farm; photo by Edwin Remsberg

Where:
Highmoor Farm, UMaine Agricultural Experiment Station
52 US Route
202, Monmouth, Maine 04259
Tel. 207.933.2100

The class will begin in the meeting room behind the barn. If weather permits, we will have a pruning demonstration in the orchard and a tour of our fruit tree research orchards.

Directions

Traveling North on I-95:  Take Exit 75 off the Maine Turnpike in Auburn (left turn off the exit ramp).  Go through Lewiston and travel east 17.9 miles on Route 202.  Highmoor Farm is on your right.

Traveling South on I-95:  Take Exit 109B off I-95 in Augusta and travel west on Route 202 for 15.7 miles.  Highmoor Farm is on your left.

For more information, contact Renae Moran at 207.933.2100 or email rmoran@maine.edu.

If you are a person with a disability and will need any accommodations to participate in this class, please call Pam St. Peter at 207.933.2100 to discuss your needs, TDD 1-800-287-8957 (in Maine).   Please contact us at least one week prior to this event to assure fullest possible attention to your needs.

Pruning Fruit Trees Class – April 5, 2014

Friday, January 17th, 2014

Pruning Fruit Trees Class

pruning a fruit tree

Saturday, April 5, 2014
10:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Highmoor Farm, UMaine Agricultural Experiment Station
52 US Route 202, Monmouth, Maine 04259
Registration Fee:  $9.00
Preregistration is required through MSAD #11 Adult Education.
Course ID:  6200.01.0.314.51.106501

Register online or contact Diann Bailey at dbailey@msad11.org or 207.582.3774 to preregister.

The Pruning Fruit Trees class will cover basic pruning techniques for apple, pear, peach and cherry trees and will include a demonstration as well as an opportunity for hands-on learning. The class will be taught by Renae Moran, Tree Fruit Specialist for the University of Maine. It will be held outdoors at the University of Maine Highmoor Farm in Monmouth. Students should meet in the parking lot behind the barn.

Please contact Renae Moran for more information about the class at 207.933.2100 or rmoran@maine.edu.

Directions

Traveling North on I-95:  Take Exit 75 off the Maine Turnpike in Auburn (left turn off the exit ramp).  Go through Lewiston and travel east 17.9 miles on Route 202.  Highmoor Farm will be on your right.

Traveling South on I-95:  Take Exit 109B off I-95 in Augusta and travel west 15.7 miles on Route 202.  Highmoor Farm will be on your left.

Fruit Tree Class at Highmoor Farm – February 15, 2014

Thursday, January 16th, 2014

Please note:  This class is filled.

What:
This half-day workshop on the basics of growing fruit trees will focus on growing apples for commercial sale.  This class will cover pruning, fertilizers, fruit thinning, insect pests, diseases and spraying.  If weather permits, we will have a pruning demonstration in the orchard. The class is free of charge, but please preregister by contacting Renae Moran at 207.933.2100 X105 or rmoran@maine.edu.

AGENDA

10:00 AM Welcome and Introductions
10:10 AM What to Expect When Growing Apple and Other Tree Fruits
10:30 AM Fruit Thinning
11:00 AM Break
11:15 AM Nutrition and Fertilizing
11:45 AM Harvest Management with Stop Drops
12:00 PM Lunch
1:00 PM Insect Pests and Diseases
2:00 PM Spraying
2:30 PM Pruning

Who:
This class is for people who would like to learn more about the cultural requirements of fruit trees, in particular pruning, insect pests and diseases.  The class will be taught by Renae Moran, Tree Fruit Specialist for the University of Maine.

When: Saturday, February 15, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM
There will be a one-hour break at noon, so bring a lunch.  Snacks and drinks will be provided.

Highmoor Farm Sign

Where:
Highmoor Farm, UMaine Agricultural Experiment Station
52 US Route
202, Monmouth, Maine 04259
Tel. 207.933.2100

The class will begin in the meeting room behind the barn.

Directions

Traveling North on I-95:  Take Exit 75 off the Maine Turnpike in Auburn (left turn off the exit ramp).  Go through Lewiston and travel east 17.9 miles on Route 202.  Highmoor Farm will be on your right.

Traveling South on I-95:  Take Exit 109B off I-95 in Augusta and travel west 15.7 miles on Route 202.  Highmoor Farm will be on your left.

For more information, contact Renae Moran at 207.933.2100 or email rmoran@maine.edu.

If you are a person with a disability and will need any accommodations to participate in this class, please call Pam St. Peter at 207.933.2100 to discuss your needs, TDD 1-800-287-8957 (in Maine).   Please contact us at least one week prior to this event to assure fullest possible attention to your needs.

 

Maine Vegetable and Fruit School 2014

Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

University of Maine Cooperative Extension Highmoor FarmThe day-long school is offered on two dates at two locations: March 10 in Portland or March 11 in Bangor.  Preregistration is required.  Registration cost is $35 and includes lunch. Please register by February 21, 2014.

Print a registration form (PDF)

Maine Vegetable and Fruit School is hosted by

  • University of Maine Cooperative Extension
  • Maine Vegetable & Small Fruit Growers Association

Monday, March 10, 2014
SEASONS CONFERENCE CENTER

155 Riverside Street, Portland, Maine 04103
Tel. 207.775.6336

Tuesday, March 11, 2014
BANGOR MOTOR INN CONFERENCE CENTER

701 Hogan Road, Bangor, Maine 04401
Tel. 207.947.0355 or 1.800.244.0355

 

AGENDA – March 10 and March 11, 2014

8:30 AM REGISTRATION
9:00 AM Legislative Update: Pesticide Application, Certification and More…
      — Maine Board of Pesticides Control
9:30 AM Think Before You Spread – Fertilizer Applications for Long Term Impacts
      — Dr. Eric Sideman and Mark Hutchinson
10:00 AM Soil Fertility Planning at Laughingstock Farm
      — Lisa Turner
10:30 AM BREAK
10:45 AM Compost for High Tunnel Tomatoes
      — Kate Marshall
11:30 AM Soil Conditioning with Wood Chips
      — Dr. Suzanne Morse
12:00 PM LUNCH
1:00 PM Food Safety Modernization Act: Potential Impacts on Your Farm
     — Heather Bryant
1:30 PM Farm Food Safety Discussion: Do I Really Have To?
      — Dr. Jason Bolton, Linda Titus and Heather Bryant
2:00 PM BREAK
2:15 PM What’s New and What’s Best for Potatoes?
      — Dr. John Jemison
2:45 PM A Pumpkin Disease Spray Program – Putting the Pieces Together
      — Dr. Mark Hutton
3:15 PM Innovative Strawberry Growing Practices
      — Dr. David Handley
3:45 PM WRAP-UP & EVALUATION

Speakers

Jason Bolton – Food Safety Specialist, University of Maine Cooperative Extension
Heather Bryant – Field Specialist, University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension
Dr. David Handley – Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist, UMaine Cooperative Extension
Mark Hutchinson – Extension Professor, University of Maine Cooperative Extension
Dr. Mark Hutton – Vegetable Specialist, University of Maine Cooperative Extension
Dr. John Jemison – Water Quality and Soil Specialist, UMaine Cooperative Extension
Kate Marshall – Graduate Student, University of Maine
Dr. Suzanne Morse – Professor of Applied Botany, College of the Atlantic, Bar Harbor, Maine
Dr. Eric Sideman – Organic Crop Specialist, Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association
Linda Titus – Coordinator, GAP/GHP Advisory Program, AgMatters
Ralph Turner – Laughingstock Farm, Durham, Maine

Thank you to Northeast Agricultural Sales, Inc. for sponsoring our morning break.


Participants may receive 2.0 Pesticide Applicator recertification credits for attending.  Certified Crop Advisors may earn 5.0 recertification credits for participation.


For more information about this or other workshops, please contact:

Mark Hutchinson, Extension Educator
University of Maine Cooperative Extension
Knox – Lincoln Counties
377 Manktown Road
Waldoboro, ME 04572-5815
Tel. 207.832.0343 or 1.800.244.2104 (in Maine).
mhutch@maine.edu  


Any person with a disability who needs accommodations to participate in this program should contact Mark Hutchinson at 1.800.244.2104, or 1.800.287.8957 (TDD) to discuss any needed arrangements at least seven days in advance.

 

 

Pesticide Applicator Training – November 14, 2013

Monday, September 30th, 2013

Pesticide Applicator License Exam Training

Thursday, November 14, 2013
8:00 AM to 3:30 PM
Highmoor Farm, 52 US Route 202, Monmouth, Maine 04259
Registration fee is $10.00. Lunch cost is additional $15.00 (optional).  PREREGISTRATION IS REQUIRED.

Contact Pam St. Peter at pamela.stpeter@maine.edu or 207.933.2100 to preregister.

Cost for registration is $10.00 per person for the training session, plus an optional $15.00 if you would like to sign up for the catered lunch. Checks are to be made payable to University of Maine Cooperative Extension.

The Core pesticide training and exam will be offered in the morning, followed by lunch. There will be Orchard Fruit Commodity AND Vegetable Commodity trainings and exams offered concurrently in the afternoon.

Please go to the Pesticide Safety Education Program webpage for information on acquiring study materials, or call Meghan Dill at 207.581.3878. The Core Manual cost is $15.00, which also includes a pesticide application logbook. The Orchard Fruit Private Manual costs $8.00 and a digital version of this manual is available for free. The Vegetable Private Manual cost is $8.00.

Attending a training session or purchase of manuals is not required to take an applicator license exam. The training and manuals provide useful information at subsidized cost to enhance safety and minimize risk.

Do You Need a Pesticide Applicator License?
An Agricultural Basic pesticide applicator license is required for fruit, vegetable and grain growers who use only general use (over-the-counter) pesticides and annually sell more than $1,000 of plants or plant products intended for human consumption. To obtain an Agricultural Basic pesticide applicator license, the candidate must pass a written, closed book examination. The test is called the Core Exam and covers general pesticide information.

A Private pesticide applicator license is necessary for anyone who wishes to purchase, apply or supervise application of general use or restricted or limited use pesticides with the intent of producing a commodity. These pesticides may be used only on property owned, leased or rented by the licensee or licensee’s employer. Typical Private license holders include farmers, greenhouse operators, florists, orchardists, Christmas tree growers and foresters. To obtain a Private license, the candidate must pass the Core Exam, and a second Commodity Exam that measures knowledge of pest management practices for a given crop or crop family.

How Do You Get a License?
Once the required exam(s) are passed, the candidate is certified for three years and is eligible for a license. Licenses are obtained by submitting an application and $15.00 to the Maine Board of Pesticides Control.

AGENDA

8:00 AM Core Pesticide Safety Training, Part I
9:30 AM Break
9:45 AM Core Training, Part II

11:15 AM Core Exam
A passing grade on the Core Exam makes a person eligible for an Agricultural Basic pesticide applicator license.
12:30 PM Lunch – catered or bring your own
1:15 PM Orchard Fruit Commodity Training and Vegetable Commodity Training
Held concurrently
2:15 PM Break
2:30 PM Orchard Fruit Commodity Exam and Vegetable Commodity Exam
Held concurrently
A passing grade on the Core Exam AND Commodity Exam makes a person eligible for a Private pesticide applicator license.


Directions to Highmoor Farm, 52 US Route 202, Monmouth, Maine 04259 (207.933.2100)

Traveling North on I-95:  Drive north on the Maine Turnpike (I-95) and take Exit 86 in Sabattus. Turn left onto Route 9/Middle Road. Travel about 2 miles on Route 9 East, then turn left onto Route 132. After 4.5 miles, turn left onto Leeds Junction Road. Travel about 2.8 miles, then turn right onto U.S. Route 202 and travel about 1.3 miles up the road until you see Highmoor Farm on the right.

Traveling South on I-95:  Take Exit 109B in Augusta. Continue west on U.S. Route 202 and travel about 15 miles. Highmoor Farm will be on the left.

If you are a person with a disability and will need any accommodations to participate in this program, please call Pam St. Peter at the Highmoor Farm at 207.933.2100 or TDD 1.800.287.8957 to discuss your needs at least 7 days prior to this event.

Highmoor Farm Fall Harvest Sale – October 10, 2013

Monday, September 16th, 2013

2013 Highmoor Fall Harvest Sale at UMaine

Staff from UMaine’s Highmoor Farm in Monmouth will be on the Orono campus again this fall to sell high quality apples and pumpkins.  We hope to see you there!

Highmoor Fall Harvest Sale
Thursday, October 10, 2013 –
weather permitting
10:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Located by the Cyrus Pavilion Theatre, between Winslow Hall and Fogler Library

Apples

The following apple varieties will be on sale:
Cortland                            Empire
Gala                                    Golden Delicious
Macoun                             McIntosh
Snow Sweet

Apple prices:  $1.00/lb

$2.00/lb for HoneyCrisp and organically grown HoneyCrisp

Variety of pumpkins

There will be several varieties of pumpkins on sale.

Pumpkin prices:

$3:00/small
$5.00/medium
$8.00/large

 

For more information, please contact Greg Koller, Highmoor Farm Superintendent, at 933.2100 or gkoller@maine.edu.

Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 11 – September 6, 2013

Friday, September 6th, 2013

Sweet Corn

Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 11 – September 6, 2013

For full page print version, please see link at the bottom. Click on photos to enlarge.

Last Regular Issue for 2013

LATE SILKING CORN STILL NEEDS PROTECTION

Higher Earworm Counts in Southern and Coastal Locations

This will be the final issue of the Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter for the 2013 season. I would like to thank all of the growers who participated in the program this year, and our team of IPM scouts including Kara Rowley, Hayden Koller, Tammy Cushman, Griffin Dill and Sean McAuley, with help from John Hutton. Thanks to Pam St. Peter for getting us to print and keeping up the web page.  Input from our readers is welcome. Please call or e-mail us with your questions, comments and suggestions.

SITUATION
The storm last week appears to have brought some corn earworm moths into the state, as well as several inches of rain. Post Labor Day corn has matured quickly, but the market seems to be holding well, even with a plentiful supply. Insect pressure is relatively low for this late in the summer, especially in more northern and inland sites; although any weather coming up from the tropics over the next few weeks could change that status very quickly.

European corn borer:  Moth catches were fairly low and sporadic this week. A weak second generation appears to be showing up in a few locations, but most sites are well under threshold. Fields in Dayton, North Berwick, Wayne and Wells exceeded the threshold of 5 moths per week in silking corn, but only the Wayne field is not presently under a spray interval for corn earworm.

Corn earworm:  Moth counts were higher in some southern and coastal locations this week, suggesting that the recent storm may have brought in some moths. A 4-day spray interval for fresh silking corn was recommended at one site in Cape Elizabeth. A 5-day spray interval was recommended in Monmouth and the other Cape Elizabeth site. A 6-day spray interval was recommended for silking fields in Biddeford, a Dayton site, New Gloucester, North Berwick, Poland Spring, Sabattus, Warren and one Wells site. Remember that any storm fronts moving up from the south can bring lots of corn earworm with them and change the situation rapidly for any silking corn remaining.

Corn Earworm Larvae

Corn Earworm Larvae, photo by David Handley

Fall Armyworm Injury on Corn Leaves

Fall Armyworm Injury on Corn Leaves, photo by David Handley

Fall armyworm:  Moth counts were higher in some sites this week, but most remain under threshold for silking corn. Fall armyworm exceeded the threshold of three moths for silking corn in Cape Elizabeth, Dayton, Monmouth, New Gloucester, Nobleboro, Oxford, Warren and Wells.

Remember to plow down your corn stalks.
Plowing down corn stalks destroys overwintering sites for European corn borer. Winter rye can be planted after plow down to prevent soil erosion and conserve nutrients.

Male and Female Spotted Wing Drosophila Flies

Male (left) and Female (right) Spotted Wing Drosophila, photo by Griffin Dill. Actual size: 2-3 mm.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert:  Fruit fly counts are increasing significantly this week and we’re getting more reports of larvae in ripening fruit, including fall raspberries, blueberries, blackberries and grapes. All ripening fruit should be protected with regular and repeated treatments of an approved insecticide. In most fields a 4 to 5 day spray interval is needed to prevent infestation.  Visit our website for details:  http://umaine.edu/highmoor/spotted-wing-drosophila/.

The New England Vegetable & Fruit Conference will be held in Manchester, New Hampshire on December 17, 18, and 19, 2013. Program and registration information will be coming soon.  Visit the website: http://www.newenglandvfc.org/.

Sincerely,

David T. Handley
Vegetable & Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME  04259        Orono, ME  04473
207.933.2100                          1.800.287.0279

Sweet Corn IPM Weekly Scouting Summary

Location CEW
Moths
ECB
Moths
FAW
Moths
Recommendations / Comments
Auburn 0 0 0 No spray recommended
Biddeford 3 2 1 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Cape Elizabeth I 4 3 0 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Cape Elizabeth II 12 0 5 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Dayton I 1 3 3 One spray recommended for FAW on all silking corn
Dayton II 3 11 1 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Farmington 0 1 1 No spray recommended
Lewiston 0 3 0 No spray recommended
Monmouth 4 3 3 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
New Gloucester 2 0 3 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Nobleboro 0 0 6 One spray recommended for FAW on all silking corn
No. Berwick 3 8 0 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Oxford 0 0 3 One spray recommended for FAW on all silking corn
Poland Spring 2 0 0 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Sabattus 2 1 1 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Wales 0 0 2 No spray recommended
Warren 3 2 9 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Wayne 0 6 0 One spray recommended for ECB on all silking corn
Wells I 0 0 0 No spray recommended
Wells II 2 5 5 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn

 

CEW: Corn earworm (Only fresh silking corn should be sprayed for this insect.)
ECB: European corn borer
FAW: Fall armyworm

Corn Earworm Spray Thresholds for Pheromone Traps

Moths caught per week Moths caught per night Spray interval
0.0 to 1.4 0.0 to 0.2 No spray
1.5 to 3.5 0.3 to 0.5 Spray every 6 days
3.6 to 7.0 0.6 to 1.0 Spray every 5 days
7.1 to 91 1.1 to 13.0 Spray every 4 days
More than 91 More than 13 Spray every 3 days

Thresholds apply only to corn with exposed fresh silk. Lengthen spray intervals by one day if maximum daily temperature is less than 80°F.

European Corn Borer Thresholds
Whorl stage:  30% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Pre-tassel-silk:  15% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Silk:  5 or more moths caught in pheromone traps in one week.

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

Published and distributed in furtherance of the Acts of Congress of May 8 and June 30, 1914, by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, the Land Grant University of the State of Maine and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating.  Cooperative Extension and other agencies of the U.S.D.A. provide equal opportunities in programs and employment.

Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 10 – August 30, 2013

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013

Sweet CornSweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 10 – August 30, 2013

For full page print version, please see link at the bottom. Click on photos to enlarge.

LOW CORN PEST PRESSURE FOR LATE SEASON CORN

Higher Fall Armyworm Moth Counts in some Southern and Coastal Locations

SITUATION
Late corn has been maturing quickly in much of the state, under good weather conditions. It looks as though there will be a good supply of high quality corn for the holiday weekend. Insect pests remain fairly quiet this week.  Vertebrate pest problems have been increasing. Many fields have been visited by hungry birds, skunks, raccoons and deer recently. Next week will be the last regular issue of the Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter for the 2013 season.

Corn Harvester

Corn Harvester, photo by David Handley

European Corn Borer Moth

European Corn Borer Moth, photo by David Handley

European corn borer:  Moth catches were up in some locations this week suggesting that a weak second generation of European corn borer may be getting started in southern Maine. These moths could threaten silking corn in fields that are not under a regular spray schedule for corn earworm. Fields in New Gloucester, Nobleboro, North Berwick and Sabattus exceeded the threshold of 5 moths per week in silking corn; but the North Berwick field is under a spray interval for corn earworm, so no additional sprays should be required. Nearly all fields are in silk, so we did not scout for feeding damage this week, but based our recommendations on pheromone trap catches.

Corn earworm:  Moth counts were lower in most locations this week. Most traps caught no moths and therefore no spray intervals were recommended this week for silking corn at those sites. A 5-day spray interval was recommended for fields in one of the Dayton sites and Charleston this week. A 6-day spray interval was recommended for silking fields in Auburn, a Dayton site and North Berwick. While the relatively light pressure has meant a relaxed spray schedule for many growers this season, remember that any storm fronts that move up the coast from the south in the coming days and weeks could bring lots of corn earworm with them and change the situation rapidly for any silking corn.

Fall armyworm:  Moth counts were higher in some southern and coastal sites, but most caught few or no moths this week. Fall armyworm exceeded the weekly threshold of three moths for silking corn in Biddeford, Cape Elizabeth, Dayton, Monmouth, Nobleboro, Warren and Wells.

Male Fall Armyworm Moth

Male Fall Armyworm Moth, photo by David Handley

Spotted Wing Drosophila on Raspberry

SWD on Raspberry, photo by David Handley.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert:  Fruit fly counts are increasing at many sites this week, and more sites are now catching flies. We have more grower reports of larvae in fruit, indicating that even low trap captures signal a significant threat. We recommend that all ripening fruit be protected with an approved insecticide. Regular and repeated treatments are needed to keep fruit from becoming infested. In some locations a 7-day spray interval has not been adequate to prevent infestation, so we have tightened the spray schedule to 4 to 5 days. Chilling fruit to as close to 32ºF immediately after harvest can significantly reduce the activity and emergence of any larvae. Visit our Spotted Wing Drosophila blog for more details.

Understanding and Managing Soils for Healthy Productive Crops: This series will offer farmers strategies to successfully manage soils for long-term productivity. It will take place on Tuesdays, 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM on October 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29, at the Knox and Lincoln Counties Cooperative Extension Office, 377 Manktown Road, Waldoboro, Maine. Cost is $40 per person for the series, or $10 per session. Contact Mark Hutchinson at 207.832.0343 or mhutch@maine.edu for more information, or visit the UMaine Cooperative Extension Agriculture Programs website.

Sincerely,

David T. Handley
Vegetable & Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME  04259        Orono, ME  04473
207.933.2100                          1.800.287.0279

 

Sweet Corn IPM Weekly Scouting Summary

 

Location CEW
Moths
ECB
Moths
FAW
Moths
Recommendations / Comments
Auburn 2 0 0 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Biddeford 0 0 10 One spray recommended for FAW on all silking corn
Cape Elizabeth I 1 0 10 One spray recommended for FAW on all silking corn
Cape Elizabeth II 1 3 7 One spray recommended for FAW on all silking corn
Charleston 4 1 1 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Dayton I 2 3 3 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Dayton II 4 2 0 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Farmington 0 4 0 No spray recommended
Garland 0 3 1 No spray recommended
Levant 0 2 0 No spray recommended
Lewiston 0 0 No spray recommended
Monmouth 1 1 3 One spray recommended for FAW on all silking corn
New Gloucester 1 7 One spray recommended for ECB on all silking corn
Nobleboro 0 6 4 One spray recommended for FAW+ECB on all silking corn
No. Berwick 3 6 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Oxford 0 1 0 No spray recommended
Palmyra 0 1 0 No spray recommended
Sabattus 0 6 2 One spray recommended for ECB on all silking corn
Wales 0 1 1 No spray recommended
Warren 0 1 11 One spray recommended for FAW on all silking corn
Wayne 0 2 0 No spray recommended
Wells I 0 0 0 No spray recommended
Wells II 1 3 7 One spray recommended for FAW on all silking corn

 

CEW: Corn earworm (Only fresh silking corn should be sprayed for this insect.)
ECB: European corn borer
FAW: Fall armyworm

Corn Earworm Spray Thresholds for Pheromone Traps

Moths caught per week Moths caught per night Spray interval
0.0 to 1.4 0.0 to 0.2 No spray
1.5 to 3.5 0.3 to 0.5 Spray every 6 days
3.6 to 7.0 0.6 to 1.0 Spray every 5 days
7.1 to 91 1.1 to 13.0 Spray every 4 days
More than 91 More than 13 Spray every 3 days

Thresholds apply only to corn with exposed fresh silk. Lengthen spray intervals by one day if maximum daily temperature is less than 80°F.

European Corn Borer Thresholds
Whorl stage:  30% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Pre-tassel-silk:  15% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Silk:  5 or more moths caught in pheromone traps in one week.

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

Published and distributed in furtherance of the Acts of Congress of May 8 and June 30, 1914, by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, the Land Grant University of the State of Maine and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating.  Cooperative Extension and other agencies of the U.S.D.A. provide equal opportunities in programs and employment.

 

Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 9 – August 23, 2013

Friday, August 23rd, 2013

Sweet Corn Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 9 – August 23, 2013

For full page print version, please see link at the bottom. Click on photos to enlarge.

CORN PEST PRESSURE INCREASING IN SOUTHERN AND COASTAL REGIONS

Higher Moth Counts Require Tighter Spray Schedule for Silking Corn

SITUATION
A stretch of nice weather has been good for corn growth, but also appears to have allowed corn pests to build up in southern and coastal sites. Pest pressure is fairly light for this late in the season, however, as the tropical storm activity that often brings corn pests into the state late in the summer has been very quiet.

European corn borer:  Moth catches were very low again this week, with the exception of a couple of northern sites. Fields in Nobleboro and Levant exceeded the threshold of 5 moths per week in silking corn, but the Nobleboro field is under a spray interval for corn earworm, so no additional sprays should be required. No fields had European corn borer feeding damage over threshold.

Corn earworm:  Moth counts are rising in some southern and coastal locations, although many locations still had no moths in pheromone traps this week and do not require a spray interval for silking corn at this time.  A 4-day spray interval was recommended for silking corn in Biddeford and one Cape Elizabeth site.  A 5-day spray interval was recommended for fields in Auburn, Dayton and Nobleboro, Warren and one Wells site. A 6-day spray interval was recommended for silking fields in Lewiston, Monmouth and New Gloucester.

Corn Earworm Moth

Corn Earworm Moth, photo by David Handley

Adult Fall Armyworm

Adult Fall Armyworm, photo by David Handley

Fall armyworm:  Moth counts have increased in some southern and coastal sites, but many sites caught no moths this week. Fall armyworm moths were caught in Biddeford, Cape Elizabeth, Dayton, Livermore Falls, Monmouth, North Berwick, Oxford, Warren and one Wells site. The Biddeford, Cape Elizabeth, Monmouth, North Berwick, Oxford and Warren sites exceeded the weekly threshold of three moths for silking corn. Fall armyworm feeding damage on younger corn exceeded the spray threshold of 15% only at the Biddeford site.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Larvae in Raspberry

Spotted Wing Drosophila Larvae in Raspberry, photo by David Handley

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert:  Fruit fly counts remain quite variable around the state. We found high numbers (100+) of flies at two sites, Limington and New Gloucester, and this may be related to lower availability of fruit at these sites, as summer raspberries are now pretty much gone. Most other sites had fewer than 4 flies for the week and many sites had none. At this point however, we recommend that all ripening fruit be protected with a recommended insecticide. Regular and repeated treatments are needed to keep fruit from becoming infested. Visit our Spotted Wing Drosophila blog for more details.

Free Disposal of Banned, Unusable Pesticides:  Farmers are urged to take advantage of a free opportunity to dispose of banned or unusable pesticides that they may have on their properties. This October, the Maine Board of Pesticides Control (BPC) and the Maine Department of Environmental Protection will dispose of banned pesticides or pesticides that have become caked, frozen, or otherwise rendered unusable. This free disposal program is open to homeowners, family-owned farms and greenhouses. All people need to do is register by September 27, 2013. Registration is mandatory; drop-ins are not permitted. To register and get more information on this program and pesticide disposal, go to the BPC website at:  www.thinkfirstspraylast.org, or call 207.287.2731.

Sincerely,

David T. Handley
Vegetable & Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME  04259        Orono, ME  04473
207.933.2100                          1.800.287.0279

 

Sweet Corn IPM Weekly Scouting Summary

 

Location CEW
Moths
ECB
Moths
FAW
Moths
%Feeding
Damage
Recommendations / Comments
Auburn 5 0 0 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Biddeford 8 0 15 15% 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Cape Elizabeth I 11 0 7 5% 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Cape Elizabeth II 1 0 16 7% One spray recommended for FAW on all silking corn
Dayton I 6 2 1 3% 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Farmington 0 2 0 0% No spray recommended
Garland 0 2 0 1% No spray recommended
Levant 0 6 0 4% One spray recommended for ECB on all silking corn
Lewiston 2 2 0 0% 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Livermore Falls 0 0 1 6% No spray recommended
Monmouth 2 0 8 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
New Gloucester 3 1 0 2% 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Nobleboro 4 6 0 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
No. Berwick 0 0 13 3% One spray recommended for ECB on all silking corn
Oxford 1 0 3 One spray recommended for FAW on all silking corn
Palmyra 0 4 0 3% No spray recommended
Poland Spring 1 1 0 5% No spray recommended
Sabattus 1 0 0 10% No spray recommended
Warren 7 1 4 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Wells I 0 0 0 7% No spray recommended
Wells II 6 0 1 0% 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn

 

CEW: Corn earworm (Only fresh silking corn should be sprayed for this insect.)
ECB: European corn borer
FAW: Fall armyworm

Corn Earworm Spray Thresholds for Pheromone Traps

Moths caught per week Moths caught per night Spray interval
0.0 to 1.4 0.0 to 0.2 No spray
1.5 to 3.5 0.3 to 0.5 Spray every 6 days
3.6 to 7.0 0.6 to 1.0 Spray every 5 days
7.1 to 91 1.1 to 13.0 Spray every 4 days
More than 91 More than 13 Spray every 3 days

Thresholds apply only to corn with exposed fresh silk. Lengthen spray intervals by one day if maximum daily temperature is less than 80°F.

European Corn Borer Thresholds
Whorl stage:  30% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Pre-tassel-silk:  15% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Silk:  5 or more moths caught in pheromone traps in one week.

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

Published and distributed in furtherance of the Acts of Congress of May 8 and June 30, 1914, by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, the Land Grant University of the State of Maine and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating.  Cooperative Extension and other agencies of the U.S.D.A. provide equal opportunities in programs and employment.

Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 8 – August 16, 2013

Friday, August 16th, 2013

Sweet Corn

Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 8 – August 16, 2013

For full page print version, please see link at the bottom. Click on photos to enlarge.

ANOTHER WEEK OF LOW PEST PRESSURE

Moth Counts and Feeding Injury under Spray Thresholds in Most Corn Fields

SITUATION
Our weather continues to be dominated by fronts coming from the west and northwest, which appears to be keeping corn earworm and fall army worm moths from moving into Maine from the south in high numbers.  Most farms continue to enjoy a light spray schedule for this time of the season.

European corn borer:  Moth catches were very low again this week. In some years we may start to see a second generation of European corn borer moths emerge in the late summer, but there has been no indication of that so far this season. No silking fields exceeded the threshold of 5 moths per week. No fields had European corn borer feeding damage over threshold.

Corn earworm:  Moth counts fell slightly to even lower levels than last week in most locations. Many fields do not require a spray interval for silking corn at this time.  A 5-day spray interval was recommended for fields in Monmouth and Charleston. A 6-day spray interval was recommended for silking fields in Cape Elizabeth, Garland, Levant, North Berwick and Wales.

Fall armyworm:  Moth counts are very low for this late in the season. Fall armyworm moths were caught in Biddeford, Cape Elizabeth, one Dayton site, Levant, Lewiston and Wells this week. Only the Biddeford and Dayton sites exceeded the weekly threshold of three moths for silking corn. Sites in Biddeford and Cape Elizabeth had fall armyworm feeding damage on younger corn exceeding the spray threshold of 15%.

Fall Armyworm on Corn Silk

Fall Armyworm on Corn Silk, photo by David Handley

Aphids on Corn Tassel

Aphids on Corn Tassel, photo by Kaytlin Woodman

Aphids:  Some fields are showing infestations of aphids on corn tassels, silks and husks. While aphid feeding is not usually a significant problem, the sooty mold that develops on the husks as a result of their waste (called honeydew), is often objectionable to customers.  Sprays, other than Bt’s or spinosad products, that are used to control other corn pests also offer control of aphids, including Asana®, Capture®, Warrior® and Lannate®.

Late Blight on Tomato Leaf

Late Blight on Tomato Leaf, photo by James Dill

Late Blight:  Grower and Farm Stand Alert
Late blight has been found on tomato plants in coastal Maine (Warren) this week. This follows reports of late blight in tomato and potato plantings in Vermont and New York. Growers should be alert to catch early symptoms and be ready to apply appropriate control measures.  Symptoms include water-soaked lesions on the leaves with fine, white cottony mycelium on the undersides. Infections on the stems appear as dark, almost black lesions. Please report any suspicious symptoms to the Pest Management Office at 581-3883, or email PMO@umext.maine.edu.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert
Fruit fly counts are still variable around the state, but we are catching flies at most locations now, including Limington, Springvale, Wells, Cape Elizabeth, New Gloucester, Gray, Monmouth, Wales, Livermore Falls, Bowdoinham, Dresden and Warren.  Most traps had fewer than ten flies. The exception was, again, our Bowdoinham site, which had over 100 flies. Once spotted wing drosophila is found in your area, fruit should be protected with a recommended insecticide.  Regular and repeated treatments are needed to keep fruit from becoming infested. Visit our Spotted Wing Drosophila blog for more details.

Sincerely,

David T. Handley
Vegetable & Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME  04259        Orono, ME  04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

 

Sweet Corn IPM Weekly Scouting Summary

 

Location CEW
Moths
ECB
Moths
FAW
Moths
%Feeding
Damage
Recommendations / Comments
Auburn 0 1 0 2% No spray recommended
Biddeford 0 1 6 16% One spray recommended for FAW
Cape Elizabeth 2 2 2 26% 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Charleston 6 0 0 2% 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Dayton I 0 0 6 3% One spray recommended for FAW
Dayton II 0 0 0 1% No spray recommended
Farmington 0 0 0 0% No spray recommended
Garland 3 1 0 3% 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Levant 3 1 1 3% 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Lewiston 0 0 1 1% No spray recommended
Monmouth 5 0 2 1% 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
New Gloucester 1 2 0 1% No spray recommended
Nobleboro 1 1 0 12% No spray recommended
No. Berwick 2 1 0 3% 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Palmyra 0 1 0 4% No spray recommended
Sabattus 0 0 0 0% No spray recommended
Wales 2 0 0 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Warren 1 0 0 5% No spray recommended
Wells 0 0 1 8% No spray recommended

 

CEW: Corn earworm (Only fresh silking corn should be sprayed for this insect.)
ECB: European corn borer
FAW: Fall armyworm

Corn Earworm Spray Thresholds for Pheromone Traps

Moths caught per week Moths caught per night Spray interval
0.0 to 1.4 0.0 to 0.2 No spray
1.5 to 3.5 0.3 to 0.5 Spray every 6 days
3.6 to 7.0 0.6 to 1.0 Spray every 5 days
7.1 to 91 1.1 to 13.0 Spray every 4 days
More than 91 More than 13 Spray every 3 days

Thresholds apply only to corn with exposed fresh silk. Lengthen spray intervals by one day if maximum daily temperature is less than 80°F.

European Corn Borer Thresholds
Whorl stage: 30% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Pre-tassel-silk: 15% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Silk: 5 or more moths caught in pheromone traps in one week.

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

Published and distributed in furtherance of the Acts of Congress of May 8 and June 30, 1914, by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, the Land Grant University of the State of Maine and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating.  Cooperative Extension and other agencies of the U.S.D.A. provide equal opportunities in programs and employment.