Archive for the ‘News’ Category

UMaine Cooperative Extension Lab Bond Selected as Question 2, WABI Reports

Thursday, July 24th, 2014

WABI (Channel 5) reported the order of bond questions for the November ballot was determined by a drawing in Augusta. A bond referring to funds for an animal and plant disease and insect control lab administered by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension was selected as Question 2. The question reads, “Do you favor an $8,000,000 bond issue to support Maine agriculture, facilitate economic growth in natural resources-based industries and monitor human health threats related to ticks, mosquitoes and bedbugs through the creation of an animal and plant disease and insect control laboratory administered by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension Service?”

SeacoastOnline Interviews Kaczor About Health of Maine’s Beaches

Monday, July 14th, 2014

Keri Kaczor, of the University of Maine Cooperative Extension and coordinator of Maine Healthy Beaches, spoke with SeacoastOnline about the health of Maine’s beaches following the release of the Natural Resources Defense Council’s annual report on the water quality at beaches throughout the nation. Maine Healthy Beaches is a partnership between the UMaine Extension/Sea Grant, the Maine Department of Environmental Protection, and local municipalities. The statewide organization is dedicated to monitoring and keeping beaches clean. Kaczor said despite Maine’s low rank in the NRDC report, there are plenty of beaches in the state with nearly spotless records, and most of those beaches are in state or national parks where there is little to no developmen

Haskell Facilitates Facilitation

Tuesday, July 1st, 2014

University of Maine Cooperative Extension Professor Jane Haskell specializes in strengthening skills of group facilitators so meetings can be conducted effectively and efficiently. Fishermen and graduate students are among her more than 400 clients.

This summer, Haskell, who has authored a national facilitation-training curriculum, is working with members of Wabanaki Nations.

She’s also researching how to buoy skills of facilitators who assist refugees. Specifically, she’s studying how American-born, English-speaking facilitators and group leaders ask for feedback from refugees who have recently arrived in the United States.

Refugees, she says, may not have positive experience with regard to giving comments in a formal group setting and may not understand the concept from a Western perspective or framework.

Haskell and a colleague who specializes in immigration and refugees issues are exploring how to best partner with refugees so that their perspectives are heard and understood in Maine.

Maine Sea Grant Updates Guide to Managing Hurricane Hazards

Monday, June 30th, 2014

Hurricane hazards come in many forms, including storm surge, heavy rainfall, flooding, high winds and rip currents. All of these can affect people who live on shorefront land. To help property owners take steps now to make their homes more resilient and less damage-prone over the long run, Maine Sea Grant has updated the Maine Property Owner’s Guide to Managing Flooding, Erosion & Other Coastal Hazards.

The online resource contains detailed information on navigating state and federal regulatory and permitting processes associated with actions such as elevating a house, moving a house back away from the water, restoring dunes, creating buffers and stabilizing coastal bluffs. Normandeau Associates Environmental Consultants worked in partnership with Sea Grant and University of Maine Cooperative Extension to make this new information available. Now, not only can coastal property owners learn more about the hazards they face and what can be done to protect their property, they also can access step-by-step recommendations and permitting guidance.

Examples of property owners who have taken some of these steps are highlighted in case studies from across southern Maine. Information about a tour of resilient properties to be offered in September will be online.

Property owners in Maine’s coastal communities are encouraged to review this updated guidance document as soon as possible. By taking action now to prevent hurricane damage, public and private property owners can greatly reduce their risk of damage and avoid significant costs and delays associated with repairs and restoration.

SSI Research on Climate Change in Coastal Communities Featured in BDN

Tuesday, June 24th, 2014

The Bangor Daily News article, “UMaine researchers helping coastal communities weather the storms,” focused on a study being conducted by a team of UMaine researchers who are seeking to figure out the effects of climate change on coastal communities. The project is funded by the National Science Foundation’s Sustainability Solutions Initiative. According to the article, the team worked with people from Lincolnville and Ellsworth over 18 months to develop plans to deal with overtapped culverts. The communities were selected as models to generate information that hopefully will have broader applications around the coast. “Culverts are the backbone of infrastructure. They’re super important to communities. When they fail, it can be very expensive and disastrous for homeowners or for businesses, or for people traveling on that road. People have lost their lives,” said team member Esperanza Stancioff, an associate extension professor at the University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Maine Sea Grant.

Drummond Mentioned in BDN Article About Bees Involved in Delaware Accident

Friday, May 30th, 2014

The Bangor Daily News cited information from Frank Drummond, an entomology specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension and a UMaine professor of insect ecology, in an article about a truck carrying millions of bees overturning and releasing the bees on Interstate 95 in Delaware. The bees were heading to Ellsworth-based Allen’s Blueberry Freezer Inc., according to the article. The article cited a previous BDN report, in which Drummond stated the cost of renting hives can be a blueberry grower’s single most expensive management practice, but that the practice results in higher yields.

BDN Advances Cooperative Extension Blueberry Growers Meetings

Tuesday, February 25th, 2014

Spring meetings and training offered by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension were mentioned in the Bangor Daily News article “Maine wild blueberry industry may benefit from farm bill pilot program.” Blueberry growers will gather in March, 2014 for meetings planned by the UMaine Cooperative Extension in Waldoboro, Ellsworth and Machias. The meetings will include briefings on pollination, weeds, fertilizers, regulations, diseases and pests. The article also stated the Cooperative Extension and Maine Board of Pesticides Control will conduct training in Machias to prepare growers for the private pesticide applicator core exam and the blueberry commodity exam. Both exams will be administered after the training sessions.

WABI Reports on Cooperative Extension’s Gleaning Initiative

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013

WABI (Channel 5) reported on a Hancock County gleaning initiative — the act of harvesting extra crops and sharing with those in need — put on by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Healthy Acadia. Food collected at farms throughout the county are collected by volunteers and redistributed to food pantries throughout Hancock County.

Fenceviewer Quotes Yarborough about Blueberry Harvest

Friday, August 30th, 2013

Fenceviewer, the community news and information website for Hancock County, Maine, quoted David Yarborough, a wild blueberry specialist and horticulture professor at the University of Maine, in an article on this year’s blueberry harvest. Yarborough said the crop is looking “above average” and “the recent showers and the cooler, drier air have provided for excellent crop quality.”

Fenceviewer Reports on iCook Study Recruitment

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

Fenceviewer, the community news and information website for Hancock County, Maine, included an article on the need for participants in a University of Maine-led child food and fitness study called iCook. The five-state, $2.5 million USDA study is designed to prevent childhood obesity by improving culinary skills and promoting family meals. Researchers are seeking 100 children from the Ellsworth, Orono or Dover-Foxcroft areas who are 9 or 10 years old.