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Academics - Current Course Listings

Spring 2014

FAS  270: Immigration, Yesterday and Today

This course will use French Canadian immigration to the United States to explore key issues in today’s debates about immigration.  We will look at the similarities and differences between the two great waves of immigration, focusing on three key areas at the core of migration debates:  rights, citizenship, and migration policy; the second generation; diasporas and transnationalism.

Credits: 3

Satisfies two different Gen Ed requirements:  Ethics and Writing Intensive

T/Th from 11am-12:15pm; taught by Monique A. Roy

 

FAS 250: Exile, Migrations and Communities

This course explores the impact and implications of exile and migration with a focus on Acadian peoples.  It begins with a study of the tragic Deportation of the Acadians from their homelands beginning in 1755 and their patterns of exile and migrations.  We look at the strategies Acadians have used to maintain cultural survival first as exiles and then as minorities in Louisiana, in the Maritimes, and in Northern Maine.  Our themes include but are not limited to: the Catholic Church, education in French, the role of literature and the arts, political awakenings, women in Acadian society, the sense of place and connection to historical homeland, and the various elements of Acadian identity that transcend current geopolitical borders.

Credits: 3

Satisfies the General Education Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirement.

On-line; taught by Mary Okin

 

Fall 2013

FAS 101: Introduction to Franco American Studies

Introduces students to the French cultures of the United States, emphasizing the peoples of Maine and the Northeast region.  Examines European origins and later migrations, the impact of gender and class, the social significance of language, individual and collective expression, the effects of assimilation and the challenges faced today.  Taught in English; no knowledge of the French language is presumed.

Credits: 3

Satisfies two different Gen Ed requirements:  Cultural Diversity & International Perspectives; Social Contexts & Institutions

T/Th from 9:30-10:45am; taught by Monique A. Roy

FAS 200: Primary Sources in Franco American Studies

This service-learning independent study will introduce students to Franco American primary source materials and issues surrounding their use.  It will investigate the ways in which people create and use human records, why, and how these records relate to our understanding of the past and present.

3 Credits, taught by Jacob Albert

FAS 240: French Exploration and Settlement of Maine

The names and traces of the early French explorers and settlers remain on in many place names along the Maine Coast, including the names of mountains and hiking trails in Acadia National Park, such as Champlain, St. Sauveur, Sieur de Mons, etc.  This course examines the history of the French exploration and settlement of Maine and places the French settlement of Maine in the broader geopolitical context of the settlement of North America.

Satisfies the General Education Population and the Environment Requirement

Credits: 3

On-line; taught by Mary Okin

FAS 459: Colonial Canada

Studies Canada’s history from New France to 1850, emphasizing political, social and economic developments and relations with the American people.

Credits: 3

T/Th 12:30-1:45pm; taught by Jacques Ferland

Spring 2013

FAS 120: People, Places and Pasts

This class will explore the cultural geography of Franco America.  Together we will investigate how heritage links to place with particular emphasis on gender, class, and ethnicity. It is run as a seminar, with no prerequisites or knowledge of French or the Franco American community required.

This class fulfills the Population and Environment General Education requirement.

Tuesday/Thursday 9:30am-10:45am; Susan Pinette

FAS 250: The Acadian Experience: From Exile to Cultural Revival

This course examines the history of the Acadian peoples.  It begins with a brief overview of the founding of the Acadian colony in the early seventeenth century, and then turns to the Deportation (le grand dérangement) of the Acadians from their homelands beginning in 1755.  We look at the strategies Acadians have used to maintain cultural survival first as exiles and then as minorities in Louisiana, in the Maritimes, and in Northern Maine. Our themes include but are not limited to: the Catholic Church, education in French, the role of literature and the arts, political awakenings, women in Acadian society, the sense of place and connection to historical homeland, and the various elements of Acadian identity that transcend current geopolitical borders.   No prerequisites.

This class fulfills the Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives General Education Requirement

On-line; Mary Okin

Fall 2012

FAS 101: Introduction to Franco American Studies

Introduces students to the French cultures of the United States, emphasizing the peoples of Maine and the Northeast region. Examines European origins and later migrations, the impact of gender and class, the social significance of language, individual and collective expression, the effects of assimilation and the challenges faced today. Taught in English; no knowledge of the French language is presumed.

Satisfies the General Education Social Context and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements. Credits: 3.

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11am-12:15pm; Susan Pinette

FAS 240: French Exploration and Settlement of Maine

The names and traces of the early French explorers and settlers remain on in many place names along the Maine Coast, including the names of mountains and hiking trails in Acadia National Park, such as Champlain, St. Sauveur, Sieur de Mons, etc.  This course examines the history of the French exploration and settlement of Maine and places the French settlement of Maine in the broader geopolitical context of the settlement of North America.

Satisfies the General Education Population and the Environment Requirement

Credits: 3

On-line; Mary Okin

 


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Franco American Studies
5742 Little Hall, Room 213
Orono, Maine 04469-5742
Phone: (207) 581-3791 | Fax: (207) 581- 1832
E-mail: francostudies@maine.edu
The University of Maine
Orono, Maine 04469
207.581.1865