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Motions Passed - 2013-2014 Motions

September 18, 2013 – Faculty Senate Meeting

RESOLUTION FROM THE FACULTY SENATE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MAINE TO PRESIDENT FERGUSON

PREAMBLE

The University of Maine System (UMS) Information Technology (IT) Transformation Plan, “A Redesign of Information Technology Service Delivery,” was approved by the UMS Board of Trustees, January 2013. “A Redesign of Information Technology Service Delivery” is in its first phase of implementation, directed by UMS Chief Information Officer (CIO) Richard Thompson, by explicit instruction of Chancellor James Page. The plan was developed in response to the Chancellor’s December 2012 revised charter, after his rejection of the recommendations of an administrative IT review committee representing all campuses, formed by charter of the Chancellor May 2012. The vision of the approved plan, authored by the CIO, is “[t]o deliver seamless, high-quality and effective information technology infrastructure and services that matter to students, faculty and administrative users.” (“Administrative Review: Information Technology Services,” 2). The approved plan proposes “transformational change that establishes an accountable person within a framework that provides high engagement and oversight from campus leadership, as well as a commitment to efficiencies, savings, and a greater focus on academic programs and activities” (ibid, 4) a “new focus on academic technology” with the planned outcome of “a seamless information technology delivery system which is responsive to the needs of leadership, faculty, students and administrators” (10). The plan identifies “change of governance, development of communication, accountability and oversight,” as key factors for achieving “a streamlined and efficient system of service delivery and asset management” (15) securing “efficiencies resulting in savings of at least 10% of current operating budgets” (7) by Fiscal 2016.  The plan calls for modernization and transformation by systematically reassigning campus-level responsibilities for IT management, growth and delivery to system-level administration (the Office of the CIO), centralizing and standardizing services, procurement and funding, and policies and practices; by consolidating to system-level the management and delivery of campus and system infrastructure, support, data center operations, and communications systems; by unifying delivery of end-user technology across campuses; and by centrally organizing academic IT, web development services and learning management systems through a shared services model, all to be achieved by applying best practices (Appendix 3—Recommendations, 25-29). The plan is to be fully implemented by April 2015.

WHEREAS the University of Maine System (“The System”) Information Technology (IT) Transformation Plan, A Redesign of Information Technology Service Delivery (“The Plan”), is currently in its initial phase of implementation; and

WHEREAS aspects of The Plan implemented since inception have included establishment of a multi-campus IT Director, an Academic Information Technology Service Management Committee, a CIO council, a communications plan for leaders, administrators, technical staff and innovators, a campus commonalities report for identifying, reviewing and organizing IT services into a shared services model with campus IT management, and establishment in part of a new organizational structure; and

WHEREAS aspects of The Plan implemented since May 2013 have included governance changes impacting oversight at the campus level; and

WHEREAS aspects of The Plan implemented since May 2013 have included changes to infrastructure impacting or potentially impacting academic IT at the campus level; and

WHEREAS aspects of The Plan implemented since May 2013 impacting campus oversight and/or academic IT have been enacted without either soliciting input from or informing in a timely fashion University of Maine faculty representatives to the Academic Information Technology Service Management Committee;

AND FURTHER,

WHEREAS The Plan systemically removes autonomy and authority over development, management and delivery of academic IT infrastructure and services from University of Maine vests such autonomy and authority in The System;

AND FURTHER,

WHEREAS The Plan does not quantify or otherwise consider consequences of cost-management decision-making on the effectiveness of academic IT use and development, nor the potentially mitigating effects on proposed cost-savings due to academic IT-educational services solutions mismatches; and

WHEREAS The Plan is not informed by any study or review of current academic IT practices and needs of faculty at University of Maine and other campuses; and

WHEREAS The Plan is without mechanism for shared, direct communication between system-level administrators of The Plan and campus faculty, despite recommendation from the May 2012 review committee to “Form constituent-based advisory opportunities for consumers of IT services. These should include formally assembled groups of students, faculty, and administrative staff to have the ability for their needs to be heard and to provide priority and voice to their ideas and input” (“Administrative Review,” 10); and

AND FURTHER,

WHEREAS academic IT network and digital communications supporting are today integrated into daily classroom activities of more than 50% of University of Maine campus-based courses; and

WHEREAS The Plan makes no acknowledgement of the deep daily integration of academic IT in daily classroom activities; and

WHEREAS seamless, high-quality and effective information technology infrastructure and services via campus-based network and digital communications are further relied upon by University of Maine students in their daily and academic lives and equally by University of Maine faculty in their daily and professional lives; and

WHEREAS the vision of The Plan is precisely to deliver seamless, high-quality and effective information technology infrastructure and services that matter to students, faculty and administrative users; and

WHEREAS disruption of access to academic IT resources and services implies immediate disruption of delivery of educational materials and services for both campus-based and distance-learning courses; and

WHEREAS such disruption of services compromises the effectiveness of the teaching faculty, the reputation of affected campuses, and faith in The System’s ability to effectively oversee and manage IT centrally;

AND FURTHER,

WHEREAS repeated disruption of IT infrastructure network services occurred throughout the University of Maine campus during the first two weeks of the Fall 2013 semester; and

WHEREAS such disruptions severely negatively impacted hundreds of classes and distance-learning offerings, some repeatedly, during the first two weeks of the Fall 2013 semester; and

WHEREAS no organized system-level communication about or response to issues was evident to UM faculty or other campus-level IT stakeholders during the first two weeks of the Fall 2013 semester; and

WHEREAS System-level response to campus-wide disruptions in IT infrastructure network services was slow and inadequate, appeared to have insufficient direct knowledge of campus-level events with a concomitant lack of urgency in responsiveness, appeared inaccessible to general end-users seeking remedy from the consequences of disruptions in service, and appeared slow to acknowledge the scope of campus-level disruptions; and

WHEREAS these recent events have made superabundantly evident the need for robust mechanisms whereby faculty and other campus-level stakeholders can provide continuous input and receive timely feedback to System-level administrators implementing The Plan throughout all phases, in formats best promoting effective communication of stakeholder and end-user needs, issues, solutions and innovations;

AND FINALLY,

WHEREAS this Body has previously brought to the attention of the University of Maine administration, specifically the Office of Administration & Finance, and the Office of the Provost, concerns about lack of process and communication with regard to implementation of The Plan, and received assurances from University of Maine administration that faculty would be duly included and informed through conduits to be instituted as a campus-level priority; and

WHEREAS it has been the experience to date among UM faculty that campus-level administrative assurances of input & inform have not been adequately realized in practice;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the University of Maine Faculty Senate prevail upon the Office of the President to 1. Immediately convene an open meeting of campus-wide academic IT stakeholders before October 1 to discuss concerns with current implementation strategies and timelines of The Plan; and, 2. Begin co-development of a process for creating a proper, permanent communications mechanism between faculty campus administration and System-level administrators of The Plan, to maximize benefit and positive impact of technology integration and transformation of the “Redesign of Information Technology Service Delivery” on the teaching and research missions of the University of Maine.

SUBMITTED BY: Faculty Senate Executive Committee and Ad Hoc IT Committee of Faculty Senate of the University of Maine.

Discussion

This resolution came from faculty frustration, disruption to classes during the first week, and no reporting method when there’s a disruption. There needs to be reliable communications when IT disruptions are coming. President Ferguson didn’t believe a resolution was necessary but agrees there has been frustration and will be meeting as soon as possible with Dick Thompson. There were assurances that something like this would not happen but it did. The System needs to come have a conversation about the issues. Janet Waldron agreed, clear communication is needed and so far it’s not acceptable. UMaine Strategic Plan will guide the campus direction, IT Governance Council and IT Effectiveness Council. The Councils have been generated and will need to work with UMaine to enforce that campus is driving the technology needs.  John Gregory stated that communication is a serious issue but not sure the outage could have been avoided since they were not tied to the restructuring. PeopleSoft and other services were already here but we do need better communication moving forward.

It was stated that the Resolution was a stronger tool if it’s not passed today.  If postponed, while waiting to see how a meeting with the System Office goes, the Resolution becomes stronger.

Vote: Resolution Approved

Response to Motion by the Administration OR Responses to Motions by
the Administration

Response On IT Motion

 

October 16, 2013 – Faculty Senate Meeting

Motion to support the proposed Departmental Structure for the College of Education and Human Development.
Program Creation & Reorganization Review Committee

Background

COEHD does not have departments. Three new departments are proposed, including A) Exercise Science and STEM Education; B) Teacher and Counselor Education; and C): Educational Leadership, Higher Education and Human Development. The COEHD proposal was posted on the PCRRC website on August 21, and the open meeting was held on October 4, 2013, attended by Dean Nichols and seven faculty including the new chairs, and four PCRRC committee members. Everyone at the meeting was in favor of the new departmental organization. Concern was raised regarding departmental names to assure that the disciplines are clear to students. It was agreed that naming and content of the departments was an ongoing project, but that the number of departments and their makeup took into consideration existing programs and faculty. The PCRRC committee voted to recommend that the Faculty Senate support the full proposal for the creation of new departments in the College of Education and Human Development

Motion:

The Full Faculty Senate supports the full proposal for the creation of new departments in the College of Education and Human Development.

Motion: Approved

 

MOTION ON SHARED GOVERNANCE FROM THE FACULTY SENATE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MAINE TO PRESIDENT FERGUSON

Motion of the Faculty Senate Executive Committee

In April, 2009, the Faculty Senate of the University of Maine and the President of the University and its administration agreed to share governance in all academic affairs. The principles of shared governance are documented in the University of Maine Shared Governance Policy (available at <http://umaine.edu/facultysenate/files/2010/12/SharedGovernanceUMaine.pdf>http://umaine.edu/facultysenate/ files/2010/12/SharedGovernanceUMaine.pdf). The sense of trust and collaboration captured in this policy is emphasized by terms such as “shared confidence,” “mutual respect,” “mutual desire to collaborate,” “collaborative process.”

Due to a perceived need to move quickly, both administrators and faculty agree that during the summer of 2013 a number of administrative searches were not performed in full accordance with the agreed-on shared governance policies. This motion should not be interpreted as a statement for or against any individual appointed to a position. The failure to follow the Shared Governance Policy did not provide the faculty sufficient input or information to make a determination of the appropriateness of appointments. The Shared Governance Policy must be followed in order to ensure a fair, open, and collaborative process.

THEREFORE IT IS MOVED that the Faculty Senate requires that the principles of shared governance detailed in the University of Maine Shared Governance Policy be followed in the future. There is no emergency or expediency justifying circumvention of these core principles, no matter the time of year.

The sections of the Shared Governance Policy relevant to the selection of deans, provost, associate provost and other vice presidents and appended as part of this motion are as follows:

From Section II E (a) which states:

The faculty and administration will collaborate in the recruitment and selection of deans, the provost, associate provosts, and other vice presidents. Administrative searches are normally competitive and include open sessions to allow faculty members and other appropriate sectors within the university community to meet and give input regarding candidates. Search committees for administrators will include faculty chosen by accepted faculty governance procedures, as specified in Section A. Faculty representatives shall comprise at least half of each search committee for deans and associate provosts.

Section A in the above paragraph refers to Section II A which states:

Representation of the faculty at all levels of University shared governance will be: a) chosen by direct election by the faculty to the Faculty Senate; b) appointed by an elected faculty officer; or c) appointed by an administrator from a list of several nominated by the Committee on Committees of the Senate. For some committees, faculty members may be appointed directly by the administration or other representative body, as long as there are also faculty representatives on these committees appointed according to a, b, or c above.

Motion: Approved

Response to Motion by the Administration OR Responses to Motions by
the Administration

Response On Shared Governance and College Of Ed

 

November 13, 2013 – Faculty Senate Meeting

Motion to Update the Policy on Requirements for a University of Maine Undergraduate Degree

Background

The Faculty Senate Constitution, Section 1, Article 3 on Jurisdiction states as follows:

Degree requirements. Subject to other provisions of this Constitution, the Senate shall have the authority to act in behalf of the faculty in establishing University-wide degree requirements.

As the Faculty Senate revises and updates the Faculty Handbook, it intends to adopt and reaffirm policies related to degree requirement and curriculum matters that are already in place subject to minor revisions and updates. Among the policies found in the existing Student Handbook published at http://www.umaine.edu/handbook/ (including but not limited to the section on Awarding of Degrees found at http://umaine.edu/handbook/academics/awarding-of-degrees/) are those that relate to the granting of University of Maine undergraduate degrees.

Motion

The Faculty Senate moves that the policies on granting University of Maine undergraduate degrees are hereby adopted and reconfirmed with minor changes as follows:

Policy on Requirements for a University of Maine Undergraduate Degree

The faculty of the University of Maine determines the requirements for all degrees awarded by the University. The faculty determines that an undergraduate baccalaureate degree requires all of the following:

The student must accumulate a minimum of 120 credit hours. The program in which the student is registered may have additional requirements.

The student must receive acceptable grades in all courses required by his or her academic major.

The student must achieve an accumulative average of not less than 2.0 in University of Maine courses. The program in which the student is registered may have additional requirements.

A minimum of 30 credits originating from the University of Maine Campus is required for the attainment of any bachelor’s degree. This policy can be fulfilled in one of two ways: 1) by taking 30 credits in the senior year, or 2) by taking 30 credits at the 300 to 400 level during any year of study.

There are two exceptions to this policy:

Exception 1. Students who have already completed three or more years at the University of Maine (minimum of 90 credits of University of Maine courses) when, in the opinion of the student’s academic program faculty in consultation with the student’s dean, there is sufficient and valid reason to complete the senior year elsewhere.

Exception 2. Students who have completed a minimum of three years of work at the University of Maine and who have been admitted to an accredited professional school of medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, or divinity. With the approval of the student’s dean in consultation with the student’s program faculty, these students may qualify for the appropriate bachelor’s degree at the University of Maine upon receipt of the professional degree.

Transfer credits applicable to the granting of a University of Maine undergraduate degree normally must be from a school accredited by one of the following regional accrediting bodies:

Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools
North Central Association of Colleges and Schools
New England Association of Schools and Colleges
Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
Western Association of Schools and Colleges

For international colleges or universities, the international equivalent of regional accreditation or Ministry of Education recognition will be considered.

If course work was completed at a school not regionally accredited, a student may specifically request that their course work be considered for transfer. These recommendations include, but are not limited to:

  1. The educational quality of the sending institution.
  2. The comparability of credit to be transferred to the University of Maine.
  3. Applicability of the credit in relation to the programs being offered at the University of Maine.
  4. Additional documentation that the student may be required to provide regarding the course work for transferability.

See Transfer Credit Policy for details on transferring in credits from other schools or for courses taken while in the military service.

Discussion:

This policy is on the books but periodically revised. It’s a common policy across the US but UMaine’s policy didn’t appear to have ever been looked at by UMaine faculty. The transfer credits from accredited schools has been tightened to the big 6 accreditations since several schools cite accreditation but bodies granting those are unknown.

Comment:

Noticing that a lot of schools claim “membership” but not accreditations.
Exception 2 came from the BOT back in the 70’s and probably has only been used once, if ever.

Q.
Does this affect students that travel abroad, and how would that work?

A.
No.

Comment: Any student wanting to Study Abroad has to go through the preapproval process anyway.

Q.
Provost Hecker asked, if the Motion vetted by Faculty or the Academic Affairs Committee, and why Senate wants this done so quickly?

A.
There have been discussions on what constitutes a degree from outside the University so Faculty Senate discussed adopting a policy. The motion went to Executive Committee but not active Academic Affairs Committee. Individuals can put forth a motion, which is then discussed, on the floor. These policies have changed over time and it’s not known by who or when. This gives ownership to the Faculty and Senate.

Comment: This issue has come up in discussion at the BOT level. There is a policy in the Student Handbook but it’s unclear who wrote that policy.  The topic was discussed at an Elected Members meeting.

Q.
The Student Catalog needs be updated so should there be a date added to this?

Also this should follow the State Department of Education policy?

A.
The catalog comes out in September and is on a yearly calendar, correct? Students under the previous catalog follow that catalog. This new policy would apply to those incoming students once it’s in the catalog.

Comment:

This is an existing policy that does not change just reiterates what constitutes a degree from UMaine.

Motion to Amend the Motion on the floor from:

A minimum of 30 credits originating from the University of Maine Campus is required for the attainment of any bachelor’s degree. This policy can be fulfilled in one of two ways: 1) by taking 30 credits in the senior year, or 2) by taking 30 credits at the 300 to 400 level during any year of study.

To:

A minimum of 30 credits originating from the University of Maine Campus is required for the attainment of any bachelor’s degree. This policy can be fulfilled by taking 30 credits at the 300 or higher level over any year of study.

Discussion:

Q.
Not seeing the need for the change.

A.
This is how things come to the Senate, taking a 20-year policy and putting it back on the floor. Instead of having someone change the policy at will the faculty is taking ownership. There have been discussions regarding this issue so there’s a need for the policy.

Comment: Not sure this is something that needs Administration approval per Faculty Senate By-laws. That should be double-checked but pretty sure that’s the case.

Motion: Approved

Motion to accept a General Definition for Community Engagement Service and Outreach Committee Recommendation, November 2013

Rationale:

The Service and Outreach Committee of the Faculty Senate is recommending passage of the following motion, which includes a general definition for Community Engagement at the University of Maine. We are recommending this definition for Community Engagement because the new report from the President’s roundtable mentions the Carnegie definition and it is more inclusive of all the types of Community Engagement activities that might be engaged in or through a land grant institution like the University of Maine. The definition can be found below and at the Carnegie website:

Community Engagement describes the collaboration between institutions of higher education and their larger communities (local, regional/state, national, global) for the mutually beneficial exchange of knowledge and resources in a context of partnership and reciprocity (Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching). http://classifications.carnegiefoundation.org/descriptions/community_engagement.php?key=1213

Motion:

The Faculty Senate of the University of Maine adopts the following general definition for Community Engagement. This definition will serve as a guide in the development of Community Engagement opportunities and partnerships between students, University of Maine faculty and staff, and communities throughout the State of Maine and beyond. Community Engagement at the University of Maine is defined as the collaboration between institutions of higher education and their larger communities (local, regional/state, national, global) for the mutually beneficial exchange of knowledge and resources in a context of partnership and reciprocity (Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching).

Discussion:

Motion: Approved

Response to Motion by the Administration OR Responses to Motions by
the Administration

Response On UM Undergrad Degree & Com Engmnt

 

December 18, 2013 – Faculty Senate Meeting

To: Faculty Senate 
Date: April 3, 2013

Below please find a motion to accept revised wording for a change of grade. The current policy can be found below in the discussion.

Motion: The Faculty Senate approves the following language for the Undergraduate Catalog and, when revised, the faculty Handbook:

The Change of Grade Policy

Instructors desiring to change a grade after official posting should submit a grade change request to the MaineStreet Grade Roster. Normally, grade changes are a result of clerical errors or errors of omission. Grade changes made beyond six months of the end of a semester require approval from the Associate Dean or designee. The decision of the Associate Dean may be appealed to the faculty of the Curriculum Committee of the faculty member’s college (or equivalent academic unit) which shall be the final authority.

When entering the grade change on MaineStreet, the instructor should enter a brief written rationale containing their reasons for wanting to change the grade.

If a student wishes to improve a grade, then the option to repeat the course should be considered. For policy regarding incomplete grades, please see the incomplete grade policy in this catalog.

Discussion and Notes

Existing policy as cited in the 1988 Faculty Handbook:

“All grades changed by an instructor should state the reason for the change, and must be approved by the Dean of the College. The only exception to this change is a change from an Incomplete to a letter grade (see section on change of Incomplete grades which follows.)

The purpose of this procedure is to assure that grade changes are clearly justified for academic reasons. A change of grade should be a rarity, made only when legitimate mistakes such as computational errors, cause the initial grade to be incorrect. Change of Grade cards (YELLOW CARDS) are available in the Dean’s Office. After the card has all the appropriate signatures, it is forwarded by the Dean’s Office to the Registrar’s Office.”

The policy has to be changed to reflect the move from cards to MaineStreet. But the new policy also allows a six-month window for a grade change by the professor with no required approval. After six months the grade change will be reviewed, but a potential denial by an Associate Dean can be appealed to a faculty group—the faculty of the College Curriculum Committee.

Q.
Was this initiated by Stuart Marrs?
A.
Yes but think it originated from Student Records.

Provost Hecker commented that he heard from four Deans with concerns regarding the policy. 1. Rationale for the 6-months, 2. Yellow cards previously used had a place for the Deans signature not the Assoc. Dean, 3. May be out of the scope of work for some College Curriculum Committee’s, 4. What if there’s a disagreement by the Assoc Dean and then goes to a Curriculum Committee, will the committee overrule the Assoc Dean? 5. Responsibility should rest with the individual, 6. Rare case of disagreement may be unpopular decision. Administrators/Deans get paid to take the heat.

A.
Six months was based on some students that may not mention the issue until the next semester, that can be three or four months. Sometimes it’s a matter of recording a grade incorrectly. Rick Borgman commented that if a student doesn’t like a grade they can present it to a dean immediately, you don’t need a policy for that.

Comment: this should be a peer issues.

Motion: The motion was tabled.

 

Motion: Military Credit: Policy Adjustment From: The Academic Affairs Committee
Date: April 3, 2013

Below please find a motion to accept revised wording for policy re. Military Credit. This language has been revised to reflect faculty Senate concerns. The current policy can be found below in the discussion.

Motion: The Faculty Senate approves the following language for the Undergraduate Catalog: Military Credit:

Credit allowed will be based on recommendations of the American Council on Education (ACE) and National College Credit Recommendation Service (National CCRS, formerly National PONSI) and will correspond to subject areas offered at the University of Maine. Only courses recommended at the upper or lower baccalaureate level will be considered for transfer credit. A maximum of 15 credits will be allowed as military transfer credit (not including prior experiential learning and credit for standardized tests) and the courses will count as elective credit only unless an exception is made. The process for an exception is as follows: the student should contact his or her college or school Associate Dean who will forward the material to the appropriate department chair, unit director, or faculty member who will make the appropriate decision.

Credit for military experience: credit for learning due to duties or a position in the military is considered prior learning and will be considered in the same way as other prior experiential learning. See subsection “Prior Learning Credit” in this section.

Discussion and Notes

Current Policy

Military Credit:

Credit for military experience or corporate training programs: Normally will be allowed according to the recommendations of the American Council on Education (ACE) and National Program on Noncollegiate Sponsored Instruction (PONSI). Credit allowed in this way normally counts for elective credit only. Courses considered to be at the upper baccalaureate level will be the only courses considered for transfer credit. All military students will receive 2 credits of KPE 100X for basics/recruit training.

The revised wording removes any reference to corporate training programs, limits credit to 15 credits, and now allows for both upper and lower baccalaureate level courses to be accepted.

The credit limit protects the students in this way: these credits come in as free electives in most all cases. Having too many free electives only increases overall credits without moving a student toward graduation. This has financial aid implications.

As always, and as is now clearly stated, credits must correspond to subject areas offered at the University of Maine. This policy refers only to coursework. Credit for work experience is covered through the university’s prior experiential learning policy.

Who or what is doing the reviewing and recommending? ACE (The American Council on Education) is a nationally known and accepted organization that reviews courses to see if they are at a level of rigor and content equal to a college course and then recommends appropriate college credit. National CCRS is a similar organization developed by the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York.

Why change the policy now? A system-wide group was tasked by the Transfer Steering Committee to look into military credit. That group recommended the expansion to upper and lower baccalaureate courses. But it clearly left all specifics of policy to the campuses. This is totally our wording and our policy.

Motion: Approved

University of Maine System
General Education and Credit Transfer Working Group Progress Report and Suggested Faculty Motions on the Campuses

Background

All University of Maine System (UMS) Universities are required to meet the accreditation requirements of the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC).

The University of Maine System has convened a UMS Credit Transfer and General Education Working Group. The immediate goal of the group’s effort is to better facilitate transparency and ease in the transfer of credit for meeting general education requirements among the UMS campuses. The members of this group are listed below in Appendix A. The group also is actively engaging the registrars and transfer credit administrative staff from each of the UMS campuses.

The group was formed partially to respond to the language of Maine LD 90 that was incorporated within the language of the last Maine budget legislation. The language in part states:

Articulation agreements for general education must be in place no later than January 1, 2014 within the system and the university separately, and by September 1, 2014 between the university and the system. Articulation agreements for the science, technology, engineering and mathematics programs must be in place no later than September 1, 2014.

The meaning of the term “articulation agreement” is unclear in the legislation and thus is left largely up to the University of Maine System and its universities to define. This UMS working group is concerned only with the first sentence in the above quoted legislation while UMS “major-to-major” working groups are responding to the language of the second sentence.

To date, the UMS Credit Transfer and General Education Working Group has documented the general education requirements on each campus. (See the draft document at http://umaine.edu/facultysenate/files/2013/11/UMSGenEdCampusRqrmnts.docx)

The working group has also identified the individual courses and/or groups of courses that meet the general education requirements on each UMS campus (See the spreadsheet document at http://umaine.edu/facultysenate/files/2013/11/UMSGenEdCourseEquivs.xlsx)

Discussion

At the outset it should be noted that while there are differences in the general education categories across the seven campuses, and while the student learning outcomes for commonly shared requirements may differ, all UMS units have identified student learning outcomes and the campuses are in compliance with the standards for general education defined by NEASC. The group believes it is essential that each campus maintain its own general education curriculum, representative of its specific mission and identity, while also reflecting our shared compliance with accreditation standards. Accordingly, this document reflects both our dedication to transparency among the requirements of our individual general education curricula as well as the greatest possible level of transferability among our campuses at this level.

In the past, determining which undergraduate courses on another campus would be accepted for credit as equivalent to a course on your campus was accomplished on an ad hoc basis, “as needed” when students applied to transfer courses to your campus. Before accepting the course as equivalent, the faculty unit teaching the course would be consulted to ensure that the course would be accepted as equivalent. The courses that have transferred in the past and their equivalencies were listed in Maine Street (See Faculty Center > Advisor Center > Transfer Course Equivalencies)

Rather than continue this ad hoc approach, the registrars and transfer credit administrators have recently looked at every course at every other UMS campus to determine whether those courses at the other campuses would be accepted as equivalents on their home campus and explicitly for which courses, if any. The academic program units are consulted in the instance of questionable equivalent courses.

An immediate goal of each UMS campus is to mark each course within PeopleSoft that meets their general education requirements. Once accomplished, anyone will be able to see whether any course on any other UMS campus meets a general education requirement on that campus and, if so, which specific general education requirement is met. As an example, Appendix B lists the General Education requirements for the University of Maine campus, the explicit UMaine courses that satisfy those requirements, and courses at the other UMS campuses that will transfer as equivalent to the UMaine General Education courses. A similar table has been prepared for each of the UMS campuses.

ASSUMPTION 1: BLOCK TRANSFER IN MEETING GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
All University of Maine System (UMS) Universities meet the accreditation requirements of the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC). Therefore, a matriculated student that meets ALL of the general education course requirements at a University of Maine System institution before transferring to another UMS campus is deemed to have fulfilled ALL of the general education requirements for graduation at any of the other campuses.

Thus the student need not take any further courses to fulfill general education requirements. This is true even though general education requirements may differ substantially among the campuses. It is understood that some, many or all of the courses might transfer only as 1xxx courses that perhaps count only as elective courses and would not necessarily substitute directly for another course required for graduation in a specific major. A transferring student might still be required to take some upper level general education courses because the courses are also required by the major degree program. As example, an intensive writing course in the major or a capstone course in the major might often be required by the major degree even though these courses might also qualify as general education courses for non-transfer students.

Therefore, if a matriculated student at any University of Maine System institution has completed 100% of the general education requirements at that institution, the UMS institution to which the student is transferring will consider all general education requirements completed. It will be the student’s responsibility to ask the Registrar’s Office or Office of Student Records at the UMS institution where the general education requirements were completed to verify the completion of these requirements to the appropriate office at the new UMS institution.

Note: The above block transfer practice is little different from the current block transfer practice among the UMS campuses when a student completes a degree on one campus and then transfers to another UMS campus to earn an additional undergraduate degree. Such a student is given full faith and credit for having already completed their general education requirements and need not take meet the general education requirements again assuming that the campus from which they are transferring is NEASC accredited. They need only complete the requirements of the major on the new campus plus acquire the required number of credits for graduation. The only difference with the above block transfer procedure from current practice is that the registrar at the UMS campus from which the student is transferring may now be called upon, in appropriate cases, to verify that all general education requirements of the university have been met by the student if indeed the entire degree has not been completed on that campus.

Experience has shown that very few transfer students currently complete ALL general education course requirements on a single UMS campus prior to transferring to another UMS campus for completion of an undergraduate degree. Thus for many transfer students it is necessary to determine on a course-by-course basis if they have met specific general education requirements that they need not fulfill again.

ASSUMPTION 2: COURSE-BY-COURSE TRANSFERS TO FULFILL GENERAL EDUCATION CATEGORY REQUIREMENTS

The assumption is made that if a course on the campus to which a student is transferring meets a general education requirement AND the academic unit in consultation with the instructor(s) of the course on the campus to which the student is transferring deems that the course previously taken by the student at another UMS campus is equivalent, the student obtains credit for both the course as being equivalent and gets credit for meeting that general education category requirement on the receiving campus. This is true even if the course did not fulfill a similar general education requirement on the campus from which the student is departing and/or fulfill similar student outcome objectives.

Note: This assumption matches the current practice supported among all of the UMS campuses.

ASSUMPTION 3: COURSE TRANSFER ARTICULATION DATABASE: AUTOMATION TO PROVIDE CLARITY AND TRANSPARENCY

The assumption is made that PeopleSoft and/or MaineStreet will be enabled to allow students, faculty, administrators and the general public to readily see what courses taken on any UMS campus will fulfill the general education requirements on any other UMS campus. An example of all courses taken at other UMS campuses meeting the general education requirements on the University of Maine campus is shown in Appendix B. Similar simple course transfer charts for all of the other campuses are accessible at the General Education links at https://umaine.edu/csit/transfer-of-course-credits-among-the-university-programs/.

While the examples shown at the above link were compiled by hand as examples, the assumption is that similar tables will be generated on the fly by drawing from the up-to-date database for course transfers whenever a member of the public wants to see which courses will transfer to other UMS campuses to meet general education requirements. Thus, general education course transfer tables, whether expressed in html online or as a pdf file for download, will always be up to date. The general public will have the same access to the detailed course transfer information on the web as that provided to a student currently enrolled at a UMS campus, a potential new student or transfer, a parent, a legislator or a faculty member.

Motions Recommended for Faculty Senates on the UMS Campuses to Accommodate the Mandates of the Maine Legislature

Faculty Authority:

The responsibility for the determination of the requirements which students must meet to be eligible for an academic degree rests with the faculties of each of the several units of the University of Maine System. (Board of Trustees of the University of Maine System, Policy Manual, Section 303 Academic Degrees) As with all respected Universities across the nation and globe, credentialed faculty members are involved intimately in credentialing on a course-by-course and curriculum-by-curriculum basis each successive generation of university graduates. In it’s Constitution approved by the Chancellor of the University of Maine System pursuant to Board of Trustees’ Policies, it is clear that in regard to matters concerning student academic standards and performance, recommendations of the Faculty Senate become University policy except when explicitly disapproved by the President of the University.

Motion Discussion:

Motion 1 as listed below is likely to have very little practical effect currently on course transfers at most UMS campuses. The motion will allow however each UMS campus to state that they grant full credit for completion of general education requirements by a student on any other UMS campus. It is very similar to the current practice of granting block transfer credit for fulfilling general education requirements for a student that has completed a degree on another NEASC accredited UMS campus. Motion 2 represents the status quo on how credits for general education courses are accepted for transfer currently to each of the UMS campuses but describes the current practice as one involving course-by-course articulation agreements in order to accommodate the legislative mandate. Motion 3 concerning the course transfer articulation database will allow course-to-course articulation agreements among the UMS campus units to always be up-to-date. Addition of publicly accessible transfer tables to be automatically generated on-the-fly will greatly enhance transparency for students when investigating the transfer of courses among the campuses, allow them to plan ahead and will make transfer processes far more efficient.

Motion 1: Block Transfer in Meeting General Education Requirements

If a matriculated student at another University of Maine System institution has completed 100% of the general education requirements and assuming that the campus from which the student is transferring is accredited by NEASC, our campus will provide 100% reciprocity and acceptance of that student’s completion of the General Education requirements such that the student transferring is deemed to have completed all general education requirements. It will be the student’s responsibility to ask the Registrar’s Office or Office of Student Records at the UMS institution where the general education requirements were completed to verify and certify the completion of these requirements to the appropriate office at our campus. It should be noted that a transfer student might still be required to take some upper level General Education courses because the courses are also required by the student’s major degree program or are required of all students earning a degree at the institution.

Motion: Approved

Motion 2: Course-by-Course Articulation Agreements for Transfer of General Education Courses

A student completing only some general education requirements on one or several University of Maine System NEASC accredited campus’s before transferring must meet all of the general education requirements on the campus to which they are transferring. However, if a course on the campus to which a student is transferring meets a general education requirement AND the academic unit on the campus to which the student is transferring (in consultation with the instructor(s) of the course) determines that the course previously taken by the student is equivalent, the student obtains credit for both the course as being equivalent and receives credit for meeting that general education category requirement on the receiving campus. Such a determination constitutes a course-by-course articulation agreement for further transfer students until the faculty unit decides otherwise.

Motion: Approved

Motion 3: Development and Maintenance of a Course Transfer Articulation Database and Generation of User Friendly Course Transfer Tables
Technology shall be enabled by UMS to allow potential and existing students to readily see what courses they may take on any UMS or Maine Community College Campus that will transfer to and fulfill specific general education requirements on any UMS campus to which they might eventually transfer. That is, the table shown in Appendix B should be generated for each UMS campus and then regenerated automatically on-the-fly from the database whenever a user seeks access such that the course transfer tables are always up-to-date.

Motion: Approved

ResponseOnMilitary Crd and Gen Ed Crd Transfer

January 29, 2014 – Faculty Senate Meeting

Resolution concerning Process for Updating the Faculty Handbook

Background

The Faculty Senate on April 16, 2003 by a vote of 48 for and 1 abstention adopted the handbook which has been available since that time on the senate web site.  This is the latest version of the faculty handbook which was adopted by the senate and thus serves as the faculty handbook for the University of Maine.

The senate will use this version of the handbook as the basis for incremental updates.  The senate is further resolved that the handbook is in an electronic age a document which must serve as a master resource for policies on the University of Maine campus.  Therefore ongoing revisions will be tracked in a revision history and the senate will remain the controlling repository for supporting documents.

Resolution

The Senate approves the process by which the handbook dated April 2003 will be updated with sections approved as revisions become available.

Motion Approved

Motion to Number the Sections of the Faculty Handbook

Background

The Faculty Senate on April 16, 2003 by a vote of 48 for and 1 abstention adopted the handbook which has been available since that time on the senate web site.  The handbook states, “It is our intent that this will be an electronic document and that it will be updated once per semester by the CABC. “

In order to facilitate updates the handbook sections should be numbered with each section of substance in the chapters containing a subsection number.

Motion Approved

Motion

To renumber the chapter now listed as a second chapter 4 as chapter 5 and to adopt the numbering system for the Faculty Handbook as follows:

Chapter 1: An Introduction to the University of Maine and the University of Maine System
1.1 The Roles of the University of Maine
1.2 Governance on Campus
1.3 The University of Maine Faculty Senate
1.4 Faculty Senate – Motion on Shared Governance – 1/29/2003
1.5 Appointment, Retention, Promotion, and Tenure

Chapter 2: Faculty Privileges, Professional Ethics, and Responsibilities
2.1 Academic Freedom
2.2 Free Speech and Assembly
2.3 Professional Ethics and Plagiarism
2.4 Research
2.5 Student Evaluation of the Faculty
2.6 Faculty Review of Administrators

Chapter 3: Course Instruction Procedure and Guidelines
3.1 Course/Instruction Procedures and Guidelines

3.1.1 Course Modifications and New Courses
3.1.2 Faculty Office Hours
3.1.3 Advising Students
3.1.4 Course Syllabi
3.1.5 Distribution of the Syllabus

3.2 Class Periods

3.2.1 Class List

3.2.2 Class Attendance

3.3 Disruptive Behavior
3.4 Cheating, Plagiarism, and Academic Integrity
3.5 Tests and Examinations

3.5.1 Types of Examinations
3.5.2 Examination Scheduling
3.5.3 Absence from Final Examinations
3.5.4 Machine Scoring of Examinations
3.5.5 Examination File

3.6 Grades and Grading

3.6.1 Approved Grading Symbols and Definitions
3.6.2 Grading Policies
3.6.3 Transfer Grades

3.7 Academic Achievement Awards
3.8 Textbooks and Academic Supplies

Chapter 4: Policies, Guidelines, and Procedures
4.1 Travel Policies
4.2 Cancellation of Classes Because of Weather
4.3 Alcohol and Drug Policies; Smoking Policy
4.4 Nondiscrimination Policy
4.5 Affirmative Action Policy
4.6 Harassment Policies
4.7 Hazing Policy.
4.8 Complaint Procedure..
4.9 Weapons Policy
4.10 Violence in the Workplace Policy
4.11 Whistleblower Protection Act
4.12 AIDS Policy
4.13 Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)
4.14 Media Communications Policy
4.15 Pet Policy

Chapter 5: Helpful Information and Resources
5.1 Maine Card
5.2 Parking on Campus
5.3 Campus Mail
5.4 Telephone System
5.5 Faculty Pay Schedule
5.6 Childcare Facilities on Campus
5.7 University Housing
5.8  Auditoriums and Performance Spaces

5.8.1 Maine Center for the Arts/Hutchins Concert Hall
5.8.2 Other Auditoriums and Theaters
5.8.3 Minsky Music Recital Hall
5.8.4 Hauck Auditorium
5.8.5 Al Cyrus Pavilion Theater

5.9 Museum of Art
5.10 Recreational Facilities and Athletics
5.11 Grants, Contracts, and Extramural Funding
5.12 University IT

5.12.1 University of Maine Network for Education and Technology (UNET)
5.12.2 Department of Information Technologies (IT)
5.12.3 Networking Services
5.12.4 First Class
5.12.5 Computer Connection
5.12.6 Help Center
5.12.7 Faculty Development Center
5.12.8 Computer Repair Center
5.12.9 Other Information Technologies Services

5.13 Fogler Library

5.13.1 URSUS
5.13.2 Mariner
5.13.3 Library Checkout Privileges
5.13.4 Interlibrary Loan

5.14 Recycling
5.15 Presidential Achievement Awards

5.15.1 Presidential Research and Creative Achievement Award
5.15.2 Presidential Outstanding Teaching Award
5.15.3 Presidential Public Service Achievement Award

5.16 Center for Teaching Excellence

Motion Approved

Motion to Create a Chapter of the Faculty Handbook Devoted to Research and Scholarly Activity

Background

One of the defining characteristics of the University of Maine as the only research intensive institution in Maine is the role of research in the life of the university. The current faculty handbook fails to separate research in a substantive manner in the document.

Motion

To modify the current organization of the handbook adding in a chapter 5 which considers issues related to research and scholarship by moving section 2.4 and 5.11 to become the new sections 5.1 and 5.2. The current chapter 5 will be renumbered as chapter 6. Existing sections 2.4 and 5.11 will be reserved for additional future content in those chapters of the handbook.

Motion Approved

Response to Motions 01-29-14 copy

 

February 26, 2014 – Faculty Senate Meeting

MOTION 1
Motion to Modify the Preamble to the Faculty Handbook

From the Constitution and Bylaws Committee

Background

The preamble for the faculty handbook that was adopted on April 16, 2003 is out of date and does not properly define the process for modifying the handbook. The modified text addresses these issues.

Motion

To modify the preamble of the faculty handbook to read:
This Handbook is an information guide for University of Maine faculty, and does not supersede any collective bargaining agreements made by the Associated Faculty of the University of Maine (AFUM). The goal of the handbook is to capture key elements of administrative policy and faculty responsibility in a single resource that can provide guidance for all faculty at the University of Maine

This document has been assembled by the Constitution and Bylaws Committee (CABC) of the Faculty Senate. It is our intent that this will be an electronic document and that it will be updated once per semester by the CABC. Minor changes, such as updating a URL associated with policy which does not significantly impact faculty responsibilities or independence will be made on an ad hoc basis. All substantive changes will be required to be brought to the attention of the Faculty Senate and will be subject to a vote on during regular faculty meetings.

Comments of any sort as well as additions or corrections are solicited. For simplicity, please clearly indicate what you wish to add or subtract including the current text and the proposed text. If substantive this information will be presented to the senate in the form of a motion and will be subject to a vote. All corrections should be directed to the chair of the CABC and copied to the president of the faculty senate.

Motion Approved

MOTION 2

Motion to Modify the Research and Scholarship at UMaine section of the Faculty Handbook From the Research & Scholarship Committee Motion

Motion:

To modify the Research and Scholarship section of the faculty handbook to read:

Research and Scholarship at UMaine

One of the three missions of the University of Maine is research, and faculty members are expected to conduct research and be involved in scholarly activities. This expectation is reflected in faculty evaluation and promotion procedures. The range of scholarly activities is wide and specific to the discipline; it may include, among others, exhibited artistic creations, book writing and scholarly papers in professional journals.

Faculty members are encouraged to involve both undergraduate and graduate students in research and scholarship activities. The center for undergraduate research (CUGR, http://cugr.umaine.edu/) provides research fellowships and organizes a yearly exhibit of undergraduate research at UMaine. Similarly, the Graduate School (http://www.umaine.edu/graduate/) provides research assistanceships and publishes news regarding research performed by graduate students at UMaine.

The Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP) assists faculty and staff in seeking and managing research grants, contracts, and other extramural funding. ORSP serves as applicant, contract negotiator, and signatory authority for the University in such matters, and provides grant accounting services once an award is made. A detailed guide to resources for faculty who are currently, or have an interest in, conducting research detailing the different steps associated with research and award applications and management are provided in this document: http://www.orsp.umesp.maine.edu/ORSPDocs/Info/ORSPTraining/ORSP_Resource_Guide.pdf.

Research activities at the University of Maine are governed by federal and state regulations, and University policies which have been instituted to ensure scientific integrity, safeguard the welfare of animal and human subjects, and protect the health and safety of faculty and staff, students, and visitors to campus.

The University of Maine adheres to a strict policy of compliance. All members of the University community are responsible for familiarizing themselves, and complying with all applicable regulations and policies. Failure to do so places not only the University, but also the individual community member at risk for violations which could result in substantial administrative, civil and criminal fines and penalties. The Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP) website (http://umaine.edu/orsp/compliance/about-compliance/) provides information on key research compliance topics concerning animal and human subjects, hazardous materials,
the responsible conduct of research, fiscal accountability, intellectual property, and export control regulations. ORSP also provides online training in compliance and sponsored project management which those engaged in research and/or pursuing extramural funding are strongly encouraged or are required to complete.

Some research endeavors require specialized equipment (e.g. hazardous materials, lasers) or activities (e.g. diving, human subjects) which are associated with significant risks. Such activities are monitored by UMaine’s Office of Safety and Environmental Management (SEM) and may require specialized training prior to engaging in such research activity. For policies and training requirements, consult the SEM web site (http://sem.umaine.edu/policies-guides-and-reports/).

Motion Approved

MOTION 3
Motion to Regularly Assess Faculty Satisfaction at the University of Maine

From the UMaine Faculty Senate Environment Committee

Background

Faculty members at the University of Maine have expressed a desire to have a regular and standardized assessment of faculty satisfaction. The Environment Committee would like this regular survey to allow for

Motion

establishment of an initial standardized base line assessment of faculty satisfaction, provide a basis for national

comparison with like institutions, and enable longitudinal comparisons over time at our own institution.

After reviewing the various standardized surveys discussed in the Hanover Research document titled Assessing

Faculty and Staff Satisfaction (Feb 2012) and the recent UMaine Rising Tide Survey of Faculty Satisfaction

(2011), we recommend that the survey administered by HERI (http://www.heri.ucla.edu/facoverview.php)

be regularly used to best meet the standardization and comparison goals sought by the faculty.

The Faculty Senate urges the Administration of the University of Maine to arrange for and fund participation by

University of Maine faculty at least once every three years in the core set of questions contained in the HERI

Faculty Survey Instrument. Further, we recommend the University’s participation in the Campus Climate

Module, the Academic Advising Module and the STEM Module. In addition, we recommend that the University of Maine participate in one or more of the HERI student surveys.

Motion Approved

MOTION 4

Motion to Discard Certain Printed Periodicals

From the UMaine Faculty Senate Library Committee

Background and Rationale:

The Faculty Senate Library Advisory Committee recommends passage of the following motion, which allows Fogler library to discard journals that JSTOR has digitized and archived.

JSTOR (Journal Storage) is a not-for-profit shared digital library created in 1995 to help university and college libraries to free space on their shelves, save costs, and provide greater levels of access to content. By digitizing content to high standards and supporting its long-term preservation, JSTOR aids libraries and publishers of scholarly content transition their collections and publishing activities from print to digital operations.

JSTOR digital content is preserved in Portico (doorway to the resources), a digital repository supported by its publisher and library members, including the University of Maine. Print copies of the materials digitized in JSTOR are preserved in two official “dark archives,” one at Harvard, and one at the University of California.

JSTOR currently includes more than 2,000 academic journals. Fogler Library has print holdings in its collection for nearly half of all titles in JSTOR, and has had most of the bound volumes in storage for several years.

Motion

The Faculty Senate of the University of Maine approves library discard of those printed periodical volumes for which there is duplicate content in the JSTOR electronic archives purchased by the library.

Motion Approved

Response to Motions 02-26-2014

 

April 2, 2014 – Faculty Senate Meeting

MOTION 1 
Motion Concerning a Course Designator for Community Engagement/Service-Learning

Submitted by the Service and Outreach Committee

Background:

Community Engagement/Service-Learning Designator

UMaine received the Carnegie Classification for Community Engagement in 2008. A reclassification application will be submitted April 15, 2015.

UMaine’s Definitions:


Community Engagement describes the collaboration between institutions of higher education and their larger communities (local, regional/state, national, global) for the mutually beneficial exchange of knowledge and resources in a context of partnership and reciprocity (Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching; Approved by Faculty Senate, 2013). http://classifications.carnegiefoundation.org/descriptions/community_engagement.php?key=1213 Service-learning is defined at the at the University of Maine as “a teaching and learning strategy that integrates meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities” (National Service-Learning Clearinghouse; Approved by Faculty Senate, October, 2011) http://umaine.edu/facultysenate/motions-passed-2/2011-2012-motions/

Why should UMaine have a service-learning designator?
Helps to meet the vision of the Blue Sky Strategic Plan and land grant mission

In line with other land-grant universities

  • Other Engaged Universities (Carnegie Classified) use a service-learning designator

Carnegie Reclassification for Community Engagement

  • Having a process to identify a service-learning course will aid in the reclassification process in the future.

The Carnegie Classification for Community Engagement application asks for the number of service- learning courses taught; number of departments; number of faculty; number of students; as well as questions related to general education; core courses; courses in the major; capstone; internships/co-ops, study abroad, student research, student leadership courses, first year experience courses; graduate courses in service-learning.

Assessment/tracking

  • A designator would aid in tracking students’ participation and assessing learning outcomes as well as helping to determine impact on students, faculty, community and institution.

Assessment and tracking are needed for:

  • Carnegie Reclassification
  • NESAC accreditation (learning outcomes)
  • Association of Public Land-Grant Universities Innovation & Economic Prosperity Designation (OIED)
  • Grant writing/reports.

Locate courses

  • A designator will help students locate these courses during registration. Many students are interested in working with the community on real-world issues.
  • Students will know that they are signing up for a service-learning course when they register and that the course has a set of expectations.

Transcripts:

  • Provides recognition of the service-learning experience on student transcripts (work with student records)

Faculty Development

  • Facilitates faculty development and community partner professional development opportunities

Advising

  • Advisors can locate and communicate about service-learning courses with students

Rewards and Recognition

  • Facilitates faculty, student and community partner rewards, recognition and PR.

Networking

  • Aid in the identification of resources and networks to further support service-learning efforts on campus.

Identification and Best Practices

  • Carnegie Reclassification: 77 courses were viewed as being community engaged/service-learning courses in 2012-13
  • Helps to ensure that the course meets recognized best practices, criteria, and definition

A course would be designated SL when it meets the following criteria:

  • Graduate or undergraduate course
  • Integrates meaningful service with and course content.
  • The service addresses a community need.
  • Demonstrates one or more collaborative partnerships: Mutual benefits for the community partner and the 
students. Follows processes that are agreed upon by the partner and the instructor.
  • Student assessment and academic credit are based upon the demonstration of student learning, not on the 
service hours.
  • Critical reflection is part of the assessment process.
  • Public dissemination of project, products or findings

Motion: The Service and Outreach Committee of the Faculty Senate moves that:
The undergraduate and graduate course approval and updating processes be revised to incorporate assessment of whether a course meets the above stated service learning criteria and, if so, the course should be designated as such within the undergraduate or graduate catalogs.

Motion Approved

 

MOTION 2
 PCRRC Recommendation Regarding the Proposal to Eliminate the BA in Latin Background: The proposal for program elimination of the BA in Latin originated with the 2009-2010 Academic Program, Prioritization Working Group (APPWG). Efforts to sustain the program are documented in the PCRRC archives. The open meeting to consider the program elimination of the BA degrees in German and Latin was held on Feb. 3, 2014. Jane Smith, Chair of the Department of Modern Languages and Classics, introduced the two program eliminations. Multiple people spoke of the importance of German to modern languages, while emphasizing the importance of Latin to the Classics and for training teachers in high schools where it remains an important language. It was acknowledged that enrollments are low and that the program has been maintained by teaching efforts beyond the call of duty by individual professors. Given low enrollment and current financial problems across disciplines, the importance of Latin, as a major, needs to be weighed against continued Latin instruction and its importance to a variety of classical studies and to students who choose to pursue Latin further at another institution. We emphasize the importance of Latin training and the potential for development through cross disciplinary pursuits in multiple fields of classical study, in art, history, philosophy and languages, but (by a divided vote) we accept the proposal to eliminate the major in Latin.Motion: The Faculty Senate supports the recommendation of the PCRRC to eliminate the BA in Latin.Motion ApprovedMOTION 3
 PCRRC Recommendation Regarding the Proposal to Eliminate the BA in GermanBackground: The proposal for program elimination of the BA in German has a long history commencing with recommendation for program suspension in the 2009-2010 Academic Program, Prioritization Working Group (APPWG). Efforts to sustain the program are documented in the PCRRC archives, including the Proposal for Retention of the German Major, dated October 22, 2012, but only recently added to the PCRRC website. By the time the Program Elimination Proposal for the Bachelor of Arts in German was submitted in February 11, 2013 the only two tenure-stream positions had been vacated and left unfilled, and the program was suspended in January 2013. The rationale, as stated, for eliminating the program was largely the loss of the two positions. The open meeting to consider the program elimination of the BA degrees in German and Latin was held on Feb. 3, 2014. Jane Smith, Chair of the Department of Modern Languages and Classics, introduced the two program eliminations. She noted that she was not in favor of their elimination, and emphasized the effort made to creatively redesign the German program. There were six speakers who all stressed the importance of German and foreign languages in general, and a letter from 34 faculty members supporting language major retention.The 2012 proposal to retain German stated that as of the 2012/2013 academic year, no public University in Maine offers a major in German, and that UMaine is the only flagship University in New England that does not offer a major in German. The Blue Sky Plan proposes to “Make international and/or cross-cultural opportunities central to the undergraduate experience.” Although the BA in German is now suspended, we do not believe that it should be eliminated without further evaluation within the broader context of language needs and availability in the state of Maine.Motion: The Faculty Senate supports the recommendation of the PCRRC to keep the BA in German in suspension, rather than eliminating it, until May 30, 2015, pending the results of a Faculty-led campus and system review of language needs to support UMaine’s mission.

Motion Approved

 

MOTION 4
 PCRRC Recommendation Regarding the Elimination of the B.S. in Forest Ecosystems

Background: The proposal to eliminate this program was submitted to the PCRRC by the Dean of the College of Natural Sciences, Forestry and Agriculture in October of 2012 and was held up with other program eliminations during the work to rule process. The open meeting was held on March 28, 2014, with all in attendance favoring the elimination of the program.

Motion: The Faculty Senate supports the recommendation of the PCRRC to eliminate the B.S. in Forest Ecosystems in the School of Forest Resources.

Motion Approved

 

MOTION 5
 PCRRC Recommendation Regarding the elimination of the B.S. in Wood Science and Technology

Background: The proposal to eliminate this program was submitted to the PCRRC by the Dean of the College of Natural Sciences, Forestry and Agriculture in December of 2012 and was held up with other program

eliminations during the work to rule process. The open meeting was held on March 28, 2014, with all in attendance favoring the elimination of the program.

Motion: The Faculty Senate supports the recommendation of the PCRRC to eliminate the B.S. in Wood Science and Technology in the School of Forest Resources.

Motion Approved
 

MOTION 6
 PCRRC Recommendation Regarding the elimination of the B.S. in Aquaculture in the School of Marine Sciences

Background: The proposal to eliminate this program was submitted to the PCRRC by the Dean of the College of Natural Sciences, Forestry and Agriculture in October of 2012 and was held up with other program eliminations during the work to rule process. The open meeting was held on March 28, 2014, with all in attendance favoring the elimination of the program.

Motion: The Faculty Senate supports the recommendation of the PCRRC to eliminate the B.S. in Aquaculture in the School of Marine Sciences.

Motion Approved
MOTION 7
 PCRRC Recommendation Regarding the creation of the M.S. in Spatial Informatics

Background: The Full Program Proposal for the M.S. in Spatial Informatics (representing stage eight of the University of Maine’s Fifteen Stage Process of New Academic Program Creation) was submitted to the PCRRC on March 11, 2014. An informational meeting was held on March 19. The open meeting was held on March 28, 2014, with five in attendance, all in favor of the new program, and with proceedings and documentation posted on the PCRRC website.

Motion: The Faculty Senate supports the recommendation of the PCRRC to create the M.S. in Spatial Informatics in the School of Computing and Information Science.

Motion Approved

 

MOTION 8
 Constitution and Bylaws Committee Motion to Revise Section 2.1 and 2.2 of the Faculty Handbook

Background

The Faculty Senate on April 16, 2003 by a vote of 48 for and 1 abstention adopted the handbook which has been available since that time on the senate web site. The handbook states, “It is our intent that this will be an electronic document and that it will be updated once per semester by the CABC. “

In order to facilitate updates the handbook sections should be numbered with each section of substance in the chapters containing a subsection number.

The purpose of this motion is to revise and replace the section 2.1 and 2.2 on Academic freedom and Free Speech and Assembly (current language found in the Faculty Handbook of 2003 at http://umaine.edu/facultysenate/documents/) to reflect recent consensus and changes in legal precedents:

Whereas we concur in the following reasoning, we replace the older section with clearer language:

And whereas, the long standing tradition and expectations of the faculty of the University of Maine is to fully exercise their Academic Freedom, a clear statement of that right and its corresponding obligation of candor and of personal ownership requires that section 2.1 and 2.2 be revised.

Therefore be it resolved that the following language will replace the current language:

Chapter 2: Faculty Academic Freedom Rights and Responsibilities

Sec 2.1.a Academic Freedom Sources: Members of the faculty individually enjoy and exercise all rights secured to them by the Constitutions of the United States and the State of Maine, and by the principles of academic freedom as they are generally understood in higher education, including professional behavior standards and the expectation of academic due process and just cause, as well as rights specifically granted to them by: Trustee action, University of Maine System rules, these policies and procedures, and relevant practices or established custom of their colleges or schools and departments.

2.1 b. Academic freedom is defined at the University of Maine as the freedom to discuss, meet with others and present scholarly and personal opinions and conclusions regarding all matters in the classroom and in public, to explore all avenues of scholarship, research, and creative expression, and to reach conclusions according to one’s scholarly discernment and according to one’s own conscience on all matters, including university operations, policies and employment practices without any Institutional censure, discipline or restraint.

2.2. Academic Freedom of speech and assembly: Academic freedom also includes the right to speak, meet or write as a private citizen or within the context of one’s activities as an employee of the university without institutional discipline or restraint on matters of public concern as well as on matters related to professional duties, the functioning of the university, and university positions and policies. Academic responsibility implies the faithful performance of professional duties and obligations, the recognition of the demands of the scholarly enterprise, and the candor to make it clear that when one is speaking on matters of public interest or concern, one is speaking on behalf of oneself, not the institution.

Motion: Revision and replacement of the current Faculty Handbook language of section 2.1and 2.2 with the above language is hereby approved by the Faculty Senate.

Motion Approved

RESOLUTION

Executive Committee Resolution in Support of USM Faculty

We, the members of the Faculty Senate of the University of Maine, offer support to our colleagues, students and staff at the University of Southern Maine (USM).

Faculty Members should be treated as the highest priority asset at any university. Without highly credentialed individuals to credential succeeding generations in society, any campus loses its core purpose. The reputation and relevance of any university depend on the reputation, relevance and diversity of its faculty. Without their core knowledge, compassion and commitment, a campus is merely a collection of expensive hollow buildings.

We call on the USM and the University of Maine System (UMS) administration to support fully the faculty-led core missions of teaching, research and service and treat as their highest priority the retention of a diverse, engaged and highly credentialed faculty; without them no university can survive and thrive.

Resolution Approved

Faculty Senate 4.15.14-1 copy

 

April 30, 2014 – Faculty Senate Meeting

MOTION 1

Motion to Support a Classroom Scheduling Recommendation

Submitted by Academic Affairs Committee

Background and Analysis:

The Academic Affairs Committee of the Faculty Senate was asked by faculty in the fall of 2012 to explore the possibility of adding more 1 ¼ hour class options to the schedule, that is, to shift at least some 50 minute MWF slots to two day a week 1 ¼ hour slots.  We explored this possibility in a variety of ways (see below).  Our conclusions are as follows:

a.          We feel, and the bulk of the faculty who provided input feel, that the longer, two day a week sessions provide a more effective classroom experience.

b.         We also feel that by increasing the number of more popular two-day a week scheduling options we can distribute classes better across the week.  Note that in the fall of 2011 only 69 classes are offered across the campus at 1:10 or later in the MWF 50 minute slot.  Only 20 are offered 2:10 or later.  Meanwhile, there are 161 classes starting Tu/Th at 12:30 or later.  Thus there is likely to be a slightly positive effect on spreading classroom utilization across the available times of the week.  A simulation by Infosilem, a provider of scheduling software, modeled a change to MW afternoon classes instead of MWF, and found it “did not have a significant impact.”  There is also the real possibility of reducing classes using an alternative schedule (see below) which do not follow the standard block schedule; many of these are additional two-day-a-week offerings.

c.          If we free up one afternoon a week from 50 minute MWF classes, we feel that there will be greater opportunities for seminars, speakers, student internships, and necessary meetings.  This will enhance the vitality of the student and faculty experience.

d.          It might be possible to create a “Flex Schedule” in which a faculty member could start a class at 1:10 on a Monday, with the option of running a three-day-a-week 50 minute class, or a two day a week 1 ¼ hour class.  In fact, this is a model presented by Infosilem in its report (see “Schedule Analysis and Simulation (V 2),”  pp. 48-49).  The Queen’s University example is presented as a more efficient way to utilize space.

Therefore we are recommending that the university conduct an impact study with the goal of adding more two day a week sessions to the standard schedule.

Below is the analysis we conducted.

1.         Other schools.

A graduate student was assigned to examine a sample of other schools’ classroom schedules.  Appendix A reports the results.  While not an extensive survey, the results are suggestive.  It is not unusual to have M/W classes in addition to Tu/Th classes.  Interestingly, it is not unusual to have M/W classes within the University of Maine system.

2.         Faculty comments.

We asked for faculty input.  The complete set of comments is contained in Appendix B.  A summary follows:

There is overwhelming support, albeit not quite unanimous.

Reasonable arguments are presented, including 1 ¼ hour slots being more effective for teaching, MWF afternoon classes are being avoided anyway, it opens up time for faculty /committee meetings (and we would add for student internships, guest speakers, seminars).

A desire was expressed not to convert all MWF to MW.

A concern was expressed to make sure sufficient classrooms are available.  [This does not seem to be an issue.]

There was a suggestion for an alternative schedule:  for example a M/Th, T/F schedule.  In this case the open day would be Wednesday.  [Our recommendation does not specify the days.]

A desire was expressed that labs and other once-a-week classes still be allowed on Fridays.

There is some support within the Academic Affairs Committee for changing to MW classes all day.  If we divide MWF into slots like Tu/Th (8:00 to 9:15, 9:30 to 10:45, etc.) faculty could still schedule 50 minute MWF classes in those slots.

3.         Student feedback.

We asked the President of Student Government, Kimberly Dao, to conduct a student survey.  She advertised the survey in FirstClass, in Senate, and on Facebook.  A sample of 388 responded, with 69% of students in support.

4.         Current classroom use.

We requested information from Student Records about the distribution of classes. This information is available on request.  We received information on classes for Fall 2011 and Spring 2012. Some points are:

a.          In Fall 2011 there were 708 classes offered on MWF or Tu/Th.  (We are ignoring, for the time being, classes that use an alternative schedule not on the standard scheduling template.).  Of those 708, only 20 were offered at 2:10 or later on MWF, and only 69 at 1:10 or later.  Afternoon MWF classes are relatively unpopular slots.  One would think that moving to a M/W 1 ¼ hour option would increase the usage at these times, so this may reduce the overcrowding at peak popularity times.

Let’s put these into percentages and compare to Tu/Th.

Normal MWF classes starting at 2 or later represent only 1.1% of all fall classes.  MWF starting at 1 or later represent only 3.7% of all fall classes.

Meanwhile, normal Tu/Th classes staring at 2 or later represent 4.3% of all fall classes, 12:30 and on represent 8.5% of all fall classes.

Afternoon classes (in normal scheduling slots) are not as popular as morning classes, but MWF are much less popular than T/Th classes.

b.         Classes using an alternative schedule (which do not fit the standard schedule template) suggest there is already a lot of ad hoc M/W classes being created.  On MW we counted 48 classes lasting 1 ¼ hours or more as of 1:15 PM or later (and before 5 PM).  (Note that there are 1127 classes utilizing an alternative schedule, which might be telling us something;  we are not quite sure what without further research.  We expect many are labs and other once-a-week classes like Grad classes.)

c.          Spring 2012 tells a similar story.  Of 654 total classes on MWF or T/TH, only 19 were offered at 2:20 or later on MWF, and only 52 at 1:10 or later.  2:10 and on are very unpopular.  Classes utilizing an alternative schedule (i.e., off the grid) in spring totaled 1017.

Appendix Graphic

This unequal distribution of classes can also be seen from the following table produced by Infosilem.

What can we conclude from examining class offering?

i.          T/Th is more popular than MWF in general, most likely due to the preference for the 1 ¼ hour classes twice a week (and also an avoidance of Friday afternoons).

ii.         Because so relatively few classes are offered on MWF afternoons, a change to 1 ¼ hour slots (on MW or some other grouping (M/F, W/F)) should not be difficult to do.  Even if we started at noon.

iii.        Making some sort of change like we are considering may help reduce scheduling bottlenecks.  It might also reduce classes utilizing an alternative schedule, but only slightly.

5.         Scheduling simulation:

We requested that Enrollment Management include a simulation of a change to a MW afternoon schedule from a MWF schedule when examining classroom scheduling software.  Infosilem did this, and concluded that such a change “did not have a significant impact.”

Appendix A of Motion 1

Class Schedules at Other Schools

Appendix A of Motion 1

 

Appendix B of Motion 1

Faculty Comments on Possible M/W Class Slots like T/Th.

For Chem. and Bio. Eng,  this would not really matter.  The classes that work for two days a week, we already can fit on Tues. Thur.

***

Yes, this would work well for all the creative writing classes that I teach.

English

***

YES!! I’m very interested in the scheduling possibility. I’ve taught several times in the M/W late afternoon slot and found it very workable for my schedule and the students’. The slightly longer class period is also more effective for most of the courses I teach than the M/W/F 50-minute period.

***

I support this…
Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Maine
***

I would very much support offering MW classes, though not perhaps entirely replacing the MWF option.

As chair I often struggled to create a balanced schedule with both TTh and MWF offerings because so many of my colleagues felt strongly that the 75 minute TTh class periods allowed for more effective teaching.

Also, few people want to teach or to take a class that meets after 2:00 on Fridays, so this leaves a lot of rooms unused after 2:00 MW as well.

A move of this sort might make it possible to reserve Fridays for faculty & committee meetings.

Some people do like the shorter class periods.    50 minutes is also better for our new TAs.   Rather than going entirely to MW, we might run MWF classes up until 2:00 and then offer two MW slots at 2-3:15 and 3:30-4:45.

Thanks,

English

***

I like the MW idea.  Since I, personally, have trouble fitting everything into a 50 minute session, I always prefer to teach TTH.  In any event, the 50-minute session has always reminded me of the psychoanalytic “hour.”

English

***

Rick-

Just to have it on the record, I would be a staunch proponent of this type of schedule!

Business

***

Are you kidding? Yes, helpful, by all means!!!

Business

***

Rick & Judy,

I currently teach ENG 317 on the Monday-Wednesday 75-minute schedule, and I would be very supportive of having more courses adhere to this schedule.

I think the students find it favorable as well.

Thanks for the opportunity to provide input.

English

***

It sounds like a nice idea and would probably appeal to both students and faculty.
Business

***

Dear Judy and Richard,

I got reply from three SMS faculty.

One was very supportive.

The others were not against but wanted to make sure simulations of such scenarios take place making sure sufficient classrooms are available for all the different needs.

Best

SMS

***

Dear Judy and Rick — I strongly support longer classes on MW instead of 50 minute classes on MWF.  I teach literature and I find that 50 minutes is rarely long enough for a productive class.  My classes include lecture, discussion, and group work.

I find 50 minutes totally inadequate for my pedagogical methods.  Thank you for working on this important issue.  Best

English Department

***

Dear Judy and Rick,

I favor 75-minute classes for most classes.  Two-day teaching schedules also ease the time burden on adjunct faculty members.  Some first-year students may do better with three 50-minute classes per week.

Not to complicate matters, but I favor a MTh, TF schedule.  I think the extra day between classes would help distribute course work over the week, and it would leave a day open in the middle of the week for our proliferating meetings.  A MTh/TF schedule would also enable both students and faculty members to arrange three-day weekends for personal and professional use.

***

I am very much for this.

Thanks,

Business

***

Hi David,
I hope you are doing well!  Thanks for soliciting input from us regarding the potential change in teaching schedules.  In theory, I’m in favor of changing the M,W,F class schedule so that classes don’t meet on Fridays.  Most of the horticulture
classes meet on M,W instead of M,W,F already.  For example, PSE221, Woody Plant Identification meets on M,W from 10-12 to avoid friday classes.  I actually changed my greenhouse management M,W,F class time to T,H because attendance on Fridays was so
poor.  I do hope that it would still be okay to have labs or classes on Friday.  It seems that it would be difficult for students to schedule classes without conflicts if nothing at all happened on Fridays.  We also have at least one class that only
happens on Friday afternoons (PSE325, Turfgrass Management).  It is offered in a solid four hour block of time on Friday afternoons because a member of the turf industry teaches that class as an adjunct.  He drives from southern Maine to Orono every
day he teaches that class just to each the class and would not be able to be away from his business easily on other days of the week.  I imagine that is a pretty unusual situation, though.
Best,
Horticulture
***

Rick,

I am in total agreement with the move to go to MW and T TH Classes.  So much so, that about a year ago, I did a little research on other Maine System schools- (although focused on the business programs) and found that we are indeed an anomaly. I have attached some of what I have found- and if you think it useful, I would be happy to gather a bit more.  Honestly I went into the project with the mindset that if we have to compete with the system schools (which oddly we do) we need to offer what they offer.  As such, my focus was offering of core business classes; what I found was not surprising- all business core classes were mainly offered in a 2 day a week format, but absolutely all (YES ALL) core classes were at least offered in a either a 1 day a week or a 2 day a week format-  It broadens the accessibility of our program immensely. As it is there are several classes that are in the core and only taught M-W-F morning from 9-10 or some other time in the day.  If someone is working- this is an obstacle.  Given that in the business program, we want to attract people with some work experience, this is a particularly unique challenge for us.  One of my suggestions to Stephanie was to try and get scheduling to give us 2 classes on the bottom floor and we could schedule MW or TTH classes, and maybe 3 hour classes on Friday.

Ok so off my soap box I will go!

Thanks for listening.

Business

***

Judy & Rick,

I sent the below request out to the faculty members in the EET dept.  I received 3 responses:  2 in favor of 1.25hr M/W classes, and 1 opposed.

EET

***

Rick and Judy,  I posed your specific question regarding whether the M/W afternoon schedule change to 1 and 1/4 hours would be helpful to or desired by our unit.  At today’s Anthropology Department meeting it was unanimous that the schedule change would be helpful and should be pursued.  A point of discussion was that 2 1/2 hour seminar courses are currently scheduled for Wednesday.  It is my impression that changing time slots to 1 1/4 on Monday and Wednesday would increase the flexibility of seminars because the seminar would overlap with two classes rather than three, as well as opening up Friday afternoon.  Is that correct?

Anthropology

Recommendation on Classroom Scheduling, to Jeffrey Hecker, Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs & Provost, and Jimmy Jung, Vice President for Enrollment Management

The Faculty Senate urges the university to conduct any further impact studies necessary with the goal of adding more two-day-a-week 1 1/4 hours afternoon sessions to the standard schedule (that is, 1 1/4 hour classes on Monday and Wednesday, Monday and Friday, or Wednesday and Friday).  This likely would apply to classes beginning at 1 PM or later.  Such a change does not limit the ability of units to schedule classes in alternative formats for pedagogical reasons.  In fact, it may be possible to create a “Flex Schedule” in which a faculty member, for example, could start a class at 1:10 on a Monday, with the option of running a three-day-a-week 50 minute class, or a two day a week 1 ¼ hour class (this was the model run by Infosilem, a provider of scheduling software contracted by the University, in its simulations because some disciplines were restricted to MWF schedules for the simulation).

As you can see by the analysis following, faculty support this change, students support this change, and it is a common schedule across the country and especially in the University of Maine system.  Furthermore, the Academic Affairs Committee believes the implementation of such a flexible schedule on Monday/Wednesday/Friday afternoons would more efficiently use classroom resources.  Currently, classroom resources on M/W/F afternoons are underutilized (see “current Classroom Use” below).  At current enrollment levels, simulations run by Infosilem indicate the change would have no significant impact.  As enrollments increase, the committee feels that this change, because it would allow for more uniform distribution of classes across all block schedule time periods, would likely be beneficial.  Infosilem has indicated in its report that the University has excess room capacity. However, a few campus classrooms have utilization rates close to 80% and analysis would have to determine if they are utilized heavily MWF afternoons.

Motion:  The Faculty Senate supports the recommendation above that the University investigate the possibility of adding more two-day-a-week scheduling options as supported by faculty and students.  We request that a response be submitted to the Faculty Senate at the first full Faculty Senate meeting of Fall semester, 2014.

Motion Approved


MOTION 2

Motion on a Conflict of Interest Policy Concerning Use of Faculty Authored Instructional Materials

Submitted by Academic Affairs Committee

Background:  The proposed policy is as follows.

Conflict of Interest Policy Concerning Use of Faculty Authored Instructional Matrials

Background and Purpose:  The University of Maine recognizes the value of the scholarship produced by faculty and seeks to encourage their continuing contributions across all disciplines.

Textbooks and other instructional materials (e.g., lab manuals, collections of readings) should be assigned based largely on their academic and pedagogical value. Every instructor is responsible for selecting the most suitable textbook(s) and other instructional materials for his or her course. The University recognizes that there may be no single, obvious choice of textbook(s) or instructional

materials, and that factors such as availability and price may influence an instructor’s selection(s)

provided that pedagogical value receives primary consideration.

The purpose of this University policy and procedure is to describe the circumstances under which instructional materials authored or developed by UMaine faculty members and intended for

purchase by students in courses they teach as part of the UMaine curriculum and on which they may

or may not receive a monetary benefit may be used, and the procedure for obtaining prior approval

to assign such instructional materials.  This policy ensures that the University is responsive to actual

or perceived instances of a conflict of interest, reaffirms the University’s commitment to our students, and is consistent with measures taken at institutions of higher education to ensure that ethical standards are observed. When materials authored by faculty is given or loaned to students or otherwise made freely available (e.g., placed on library reserve, or available without fee elsewhere), this policy does not apply.

Policy Statement:  The principle of academic freedom allows faculty members to select their own instructional materials.  Faculty members are expected to assign course materials that best meet the instructional goals of their courses.  Faculty members may conclude that what they themselves have authored will best help students achieve the courses’ learning outcomes.  The faculty member may or may not realize a monetary benefit from the assignment of such materials, but in all cases an actual or perceived conflict of interest exists. In cases where such instructional material is assigned to students and intended to be purchased, this policy applies and instructors must obtain prior approval.

Although collections of course notes or Powerpoint slides are not normally expected to be reviewed under this policy, this policy does apply if the faculty member receives any monetary benefit from the sale of these items.

Procedure:  When a faculty member wishes to assign instructional materials for purchase by students that the faculty member authored or developed in courses she or he teaches as part of the UMaine curriculum on which she or he may or may not receive any monetary benefit, that faculty member shall complete and submit the attached form to the unit’s Peer Committee at least 6 weeks before the end of the semester prior to when the material will be used.   When reviewing the faculty member’s request, the Peer Committee shall consider the following criteria:

1.   How the instructional materials are recognized and used by others in the field;

2.   How the instructional materials offer a unique perspective on the topic of study;

3.   How the faculty member will disclose to the students to whom they assign the instructional materials the actual or perceived conflict of interest.

The Peer Committee shall evaluate the faculty member’s proposed instructional materials against the above criteria and communicate their decision to the department chair, school director or similar (hereafter “unit director”) no later than four weeks before the end of the semester prior to when the material will be used.  Peer committees may approve a selection of materials for use over multiple

semesters.  After three years from the initial approval, a re-review by the peer committee is required.

After receiving the decision of the peer committee, the unit director will review the application to be sure all procedures were followed and, if the unit director concurs, approve the request.  If

necessary, the unit director may ask the Peer Committee for further information. The faculty

member shall be informed of the decision of the Peer Committee and the decision of the unit

director.

If the unit director disagrees with the Peer Committee decision, or the faculty member wishes to appeal the decision, the appeal will be forwarded to a three person committee.  The committee will be composed of one faculty member chosen by the faculty member seeking the approval, the faculty chair of the Academic Affairs Committee of the Faculty Senate, and a Provost designee.

After receiving approval to assign the instructional materials for purchase by students, the faculty member shall inform students during or before the first class in a manner consistent with item 3, above, that she or he may or may not realize monetary benefit from assigning the instructional materials.

UNIVERSITY OF MAINE

Office of the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs & Provost

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES,

Approved by the Faculty Senate and the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs & Provost, date.

This policy will be added to the University of Maine Faculty Handbook and posted to the Academic Affairs website.

Policy Concerning Use of Faculty-Authored Materials

Request Form

Date:                             

Name of faculty member:                                                                                                            

Department:                                                                                                                               

Name of text or other material to be assigned:                                                                                 

Name of course:                                                                                                                          

Expected number of students enrolled:                                                                                            

Semester(s) for which authorization is sought:                                                                                     

Please respond to the following questions:

1.   Are the instructional materials recognized and used by others in the field? If yes, please explain including examples.

 

2.   Do the instructional materials offer a unique perspective on the topic of study? If yes, please explain.

3.   How will you disclose to the students to whom you wish to assign the instructional materials the actual or perceived conflict of interest?

Date of Peer Committee review:                                           

Approved:      Yes       No

Signed:                                                            

Date of Department Chair review:                                           

Approved:      Yes        No

Signed:           

 

Appendix to Motion 2

On Professors Assigning Their Own Texts to Students

The following statement was approved for publication by the Association’s Committee on Professional Ethics in November 2004. Comments are  welcome and should be addressed to the Association’s Washington office.

Professors have long assigned to their students works  of which they  were  the author. The  practice ranges from assigning commercially published textbooks they  have written to having students buy a volume they  have written and  published or course packs made up of their own materials they  have photocopied. Not only individual professors, but also academic departments and  programs, sometimes prepare instructional materials, such as laboratory manuals, that  are sold to students. Some professors place their works on electronic reserve, making them  freely available to students.

None of these practices is by itself cause for concern. The right of individual professors to select their own instructional materials, a right protected under principles of academic freedom, should be limited only by such considerations as quality,  cost, availability, and the need for coordination with other  instructors or courses. Professors should assign readings that  best meet the instructional goals of their courses, and they  may  well conclude that  what  they  themselves have written on a subject best realizes that  purpose. In some cases, indeed, students enroll in courses because of what  they  know about the professor from his or her writings,  and because they  hope to engage in discussion with the professor about those writings in the classroom. Because professors are  encouraged to publish the results of their research, they should certainly be free  to require their own students to read what  they  have written.

At the same time, however, students in a classroom can be a captive audience if they  must purchase an assigned text that is not available either  on library reserve or on a restricted website. Because professors sometimes realize profits from sales to their students (although, more often  than  not, the profits are  trivial or nonexistent), professors may seem to be inappropriately enriching themselves at the expense of their students. To guard against this possibility, some colleges and  universities have adopted policies meant to regulate the assignment of a professor’s own works.1

At Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, materials written by faculty members and intended for purchase by students may  not be assigned unless their use is first approved by the appropriate departmental, collegiate, and  university-level committees. Faculty members at the University of Minnesota cannot “personally profit from the assignment of materials” to students without authorization of the department chair.  At Southern Utah  University, a department chair and dean must  approve the assignment of faculty-authored materials. Approval  by a faculty committee is required at Cleveland State University. Faculty at North Dakota State University  and  the University of North Texas can assign their own works but are  cautioned against retaining profits earned from sales to their students unless, as the North Dakota policy states, “the text has become independently accepted in the field.”

A variant of these policies requires professors to choose between contributing to a scholarship or library fund whatever profits are realized from the sale of materials to their own students, or having the materials reviewed by a department committee or chair.  Another variant, perhaps unique, is the policy of the Department of Neurology at Case  Western Reserve  University. Students  in the residency program are given  faculty-authored textbooks free of charge.

Learned societies and  professional organizations have likewise adopted policies to prevent professors from taking advantage of their students. The  American Political Science Association, in its code of professional ethics, states that  “teachers have an ethical obligation to choose materials for student use without respect to personal or collective gain.”  The American Sociological Association takes the same position: “sociologists make decisions concerning textbooks, course content, course requirements, and grading solely on the basis of educational criteria without regard to financial or other  incentives.” The AAUP, in its Statement on Professional Ethics, has also  addressed this matter, albeit indirectly. The statement calls upon  faculty members to “avoid any exploitation” of students, from which it follows that professors should not take  advantage of students by the authority inherent in the instructional role.2

None of these policies bars faculty members from assigning their own works to students. Rather, the policies seek to ensure that course- assignment decisions are not compromised by even the appearance of impropriety. In the implementation of these policies, however, it is equally necessary to ensure that  procedures followed by colleges and  universities to protect students do not impair the freedom of faculty members or their flexibility of choice in deciding what  materials to assign their students. Professors, individually and  collectively, have the primary  responsibility for the teaching done at their institutions. Accordingly, their voice on matters having  to do with the selection of course materials should be determinative.

Endnotes:

1. State conflict-of-interest laws that  bar state employees from acting officially on matters in which they  have a financial  stake may also  be relevant for professors at state institutions. Back  to text

2. Policy and  Documents and  Reports, 9th ed.  (Washington, D.C.: AAUP, 2001), 133-34. Back  to text

(posted 1/05)

Report Category: Standing Committee and  Subcommittee Reports   Professional Ethics

Tags: Committee on Professional Ethic

Motion: The Faculty Senate approves the Conflict of Interest Policy Concerning Use of Faculty

Authored Instructional Materials as follows.

Motion Approved

 

Motion 3 to Accept Faculty Handbook Sections 2.5 through 3.8

Submitted by Academic Affairs Committee

Background: The proposed new language of these sections is as follows:

2.5 Student Evaluation of the Faculty

All instructors, regardless of professorial rank and full- or part-time status, are evaluated for each course taught.  While student evaluations are not the sole basis for administrative decisions regarding faculty teaching, they do provide comments to the instructor for self-improvement, allow student opinions to be voiced, and provide data for use in making personnel and course assignment decisions.

Evaluations are generally held in the two-week period prior to the end of classes. The instructor must not be present during the completion of forms or their collection. The instructor may explain the evaluation forms to students before the evaluation. A student or university employee collects the forms, which are then placed in an envelope in view of the class. He or she returns them to the administrative office designated for processing.  Some professors or departments are now using online evaluations.  As with written paper evaluations, student anonymity must be protected.  Results from the evaluations are available to the instructor only after final course grades are issued.

Although most units use a common evaluation instrument which allows comparisons across courses, there is no requirement to use any specific evaluation instrument.  In addition, a professor or unit may add questions if desired.  Two types of Course Evaluation forms (long or “traditional” and short or “new”) are available from the Faculty Development Center (http://www.umaine.edu/it/fdc/pages/scoring.php).

At any time during the semester, faculty members may conduct evaluations of their teaching for their own information. They may use their own forms and procedures for these evaluations.

2.6 Faculty Review of Administrators

The principles of shared governance at The University of Maine are spelled out in the “University of Maine Shared Governance Policy” agreed to by The Faculty Senate and administration April 19, 2009, available at http://umaine.edu/facultysenate/files/2010/12/SharedGovernanceUMaine.pdf.

See Section II.  Shared Governance Process and Implementation, subparts “A. Faculty Representation in Decision Making” and “E.b Academic Personnel Decisions: Evaluation.”

Currently, there is no mechanism for joint Faculty Senate and administration evaluation of Department Chairs or unit Directors.  For the evaluation of chairs and directors, each college will determine the process which will include significant faculty input, both from inside and outside the department.

The process for reviews for reappointment of deans and directors reporting to the Provost is explained in the “4th Year Evaluation Procedure for Deans/Directors” available from the Provost office.  These deans and directors are reviewed early in the last year of the individual’s current appointment.  A Dean or Associate Provost, selected by the Provost, will chair the committee.  Three faculty member will serve on the committee, two from within the college of the individual being reviewed and one from outside the college, chosen from a list of names provided by the faculty senate (six faculty members within the college and three from outside the college).  Faculty representative shall comprise at least half of each evaluation committee.  The Provost will select other committee members:  a department chair to serve on the committee, and one or more people outside the unit to serve on the committee.  Names can be requested through the PEAC and/or the CEAC.  Among the information gathered will be the results of a questionnaire sent to faculty/staff/stakeholders of the college/unit.

The process and timing of reviewing the President is specified in the University of Maine System Policy Manual, section 204.1 President – Evaluation Process, available at

http://www.maine.edu/about-the-system/board-of-trustees/policy-manual/section204-1/

A Comprehensive Review is scheduled for the third year of service and every four years thereafter.  The faculty role in that evaluation is described: “Interviews with, or other means of obtaining feedback from, all Board members, representatives of faculty, students and staff, Board of Visitors, and any other parties selected by the reviewer and Chancellor.”

The university President conducts annual reviews of those reporting directly to that office.  At present, faculty have no formal role other than by participation through annual reports of the Cabinet and direct reports.  All input is welcomed.  Each year, the President conducts an annual performance evaluation of each member of the President’s Cabinet (Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, Senior Vice President for Administration and Finance, Senior Advisor to the President, Vice President for Student Life, Vice President for Development, and Director of Athletics).  The Executive Vice President and Provost, in consultation with the President, evaluates the Vice President for Research, Vice President for Enrollment Management, and Vice President for Innovation and Economic Development due to their direct report to the Provost.  The Senior Vice President for Administration, in consultation with the President, evaluates the Associate Vice President for Human Resources and Administration.  The President also evaluates the Director of Equal Opportunity as a Direct Report.

The Annual Performance Evaluation consists of review and discussion of the divisional annual report completed by the Administrator addressing the following major emphases: (1) Executive Summary of Major Goals Accomplished in the Division in Relation to the Major Presidential Goals and Objectives and the Blue Sky Project, (2)  Identification of Major Challenges in Meeting Goals; Status of Unmet Goals, (3)  Noteworthy Divisional Points of Pride,  (4) Noteworthy Efforts to Increase Revenue, Decrease Expenditures, and Increase Fiscal Efficiency, and (5) Desired/Planned Professional Development Opportunities for the Administrator and Divisional Staff, as appropriate.

The Annual Performance Evaluation prepared by the President is then reviewed personally with the Administrator in order to set consensus based goals for the upcoming year affirming success and/or addressing challenges and improvements.  The Annual Performance Evaluation is filed with the Office of Human Resources.

Chapter 3

3.1 Course/Instruction Procedures and Guidelines

Faculty members have sole discretion on classroom pedagogy.  Faculty members are scholars, skilled communicators, educators, and mentors.  Techniques for teaching vary with subject matter, class size, and academic level of the students enrolled.  Faculty members adopt the best teaching method for the course and subject matter they teach.  Course content in all cases should reflect the catalog description.

3.1.1 Course Modifications and New Courses

New course proposals and course modifications follow a similar path.

For Undergraduate courses:  Forms for both new course proposals and course modifications can be found at the Undergraduate Programs Curriculum Committee (UPCC) website.  http://umaine.edu/upcc/forms/.

Normally a course is proposed or changed by a unit curriculum committee.  The course proposal/change form then goes to the college curriculum committee for approval, to the college dean, and then to UPCC.  Once approved by UPCC, the form is signed by the Associate Provost for Academic Affairs and submitted to the Office of Student Records.

For Graduate courses:  The form for both new course proposals and modifications, as well as instructions, can be found at http://www.umaine.edu/graduate/system/files/files/proposal.pdf.

1. The College forwards the approved course forms to the Graduate School.

2.  All new courses and courses with extensive modifications are presented before the Graduate School Graduate Curriculum Committee (GCC) by the course instructor.

3.  Once courses are reviewed/approved by the Graduate Curriculum Committee, courses are submitted before the Graduate Board for final review.  Once approved by the Graduate Board, they are signed by the Associate Provost and Dean of the Graduate School and submitted to the Office of Student Records.

Experimental courses:  Both undergraduate and graduate new courses may be submitted once as experimental courses, bypassing the UPCC or the Graduate Curriculum Committee.  They are approved by the Provost or the Graduate Dean directly.  If such a course becomes a permanent offering, it must be resubmitted through the normal approval process.

3.1.2 Faculty Office Hours

Each faculty member should schedule times when he or she will be available to consult with students.  The course syllabus normally lists office hours and faculty post hours on their office doors.  In addition, some faculty will schedule appointments at other times with students, as well as confer by phone or email.  Faculty who teach online classes normally set up chat room, Skype, or email arrangements and, for students on campus, may have live office hours.

3.1.3 Inclement Weather Policy

The university’s policy on class cancellations attributable to inclement weather can be found at:

http://umaine.edu/weatherpolicy/

3.1.4 Advising Students

Academic advising.  As part of their regularly assigned duties, faculty members act as academic advisors. The number of students per advisor is variable.  A major part of advising is discussing course choices with students and checking progress toward a degree.  Ultimately, however, each student is responsible for satisfying degree requirements.  Advisors also commonly discuss future career and education paths with students.

If a student requires further personal, academic, or career counseling, the advisor may suggest contacting the Counseling Center (phone 581-1392, online at http://umaine.edu/counseling/) and/or the Career Planning and Placement Office (phone 581-1359, online at http://umaine.edu/career/). The Counseling Center provides counseling to students experiencing stress, problems in balancing new and old relationships, or problems with balancing family and school.  The Career Planning and Placement Office offers career development counseling and help in finding a job.

Thesis and Dissertation Guidance. The Graduate School publishes “Guidelines for Thesis/Dissertation/Project Preparation” containing the rules and regulations for the format(s) required for the thesis or dissertation. The manual is available online at http://www.umaine.edu/graduate/system/files/files/Thesisguidelines.pdf. The Graduate School also conducts workshop sessions each fall/spring on thesis and dissertation preparation. The dates for presenting the thesis and holding the oral examination are available from the Graduate School. It is the responsibility of the student to ascertain appropriate due dates. Graduate School information is available online at http://www.umaine.edu/graduate/.

3.1.5 Course Syllabi

A printed or online syllabus is an outline of course content, goals and objectives, basic information about the instructor’s procedures and policies, and selected University information.

The content of syllabi varies. Departments may establish specific guidelines for the syllabi. The syllabus provides information to assist in student/instructor communication and provides guidelines for successful class performance. It presents a planned course administration, assisting both students and instructor in organization and time management, distribution of work load, etc. It also provides relevant information that university units or outside agencies review.

Please remember that your syllabus is your contract with the students who take your class. As such, it spells out your expectations of their work and clearly articulates the requirements for your course.

The Undergraduate Program Curriculum Committee (UPCC) provides a syllabus template that faculty may choose to use when developing or modifying a syllabus:

http://umaine.edu/upcc/forms/syllabus-templaterevised2-131-2/

Topics Often Covered in the Syllabus:

1)  A Heading including the course name and number, the academic unit, and the semester/year;

2)  A Course Description, including Course Goals or Objectives. Full-sentence student learning outcomes are a required component of all new or modified course syllabi submitted for UPCC review.  Explanation of method and theory may be added. [It is useful to include the general education requirements satisfied by the course.]

3) Tentative schedule for course. Additional information may be posted on line throughout the semester.

4) Required and suggested textbooks.

5) Instructor information: office hours, e-mail address, telephone number. Instructors may indicate a preferred method of contact (e.g., FirstClass, home telephone).

6) Assessment methods.  Type and number of exams, quizzes and projects may be listed. Format of exams or assessment, equipment, and make-up policy should be included. If examinations are held outside of usual class meeting times, the dates, place, and times may be provided.

7) Grading Policy and Grading Scale. The percentage of the final grade allocated to lab, homework, attendance, final projects, and examinations is stated. A list of criteria for evaluating projects, portfolios, or oral presentations may be provided.

8) Policies on cheating and plagiarism. (Defined in the pamphlet “Academic Honesty and Dishonesty.” http://www.umaine.edu/deansofstudents/honesty.htm)

9) Homework: when homework is due, format, general grading procedures.

10) Attendance. Attendance policy, and any penalty for tardiness or missed classes should be indicated. [See following section on attendance.]

11) Labs. Information on the conduct and length of laboratory time is provided.

12) Special Instructions. Information regarding disabilities, special needs, prerequisites, field trips, special equipment requirements, etc. are listed.

13) Safety and Evacuation Plans. Certain courses may require covering safety aspects including evacuation procedures in an emergency on the syllabus.

The Graduate School follows the same general format for the syllabus as UPCC.  Specific guidance for the development of graduate syllabi may be obtained from the Graduate School office (581-3217).

There are three policy statements required for every syllabus at the University of Maine:

1)     Academic Honesty Statement: Academic honesty is very important. It is dishonest to cheat on exams, to copy term papers, to submit papers written by another person, to fake experimental results, or to copy or reword parts of books or articles into your own papers without appropriately citing the source.  Students committing or aiding in any of these violations may be given failing grades for an assignment or for an entire course, at the discretion of the instructor.  In addition to any academic action taken by an instructor, these violations are also subject to action under the University of Maine Student Conduct Code.  The maximum possible sanction under the student conduct code is dismissal from the University.

2)     Students with disabilities statement: If you have a disability for which you may be requesting an accommodation, please contact Ann Smith, Director of Disabilities Services, 121 East Annex, 581-2319, as early as possible in the term.

3)     Course Schedule Disclaimer (Disruption Clause): In the event of an extended disruption of normal classroom activities, the format for this course may be modified to enable its completion within its programmed time frame. In that event, you will be provided an addendum to the syllabus that will supersede this version.

3.1.6 Distribution of the Syllabus

Syllabi should be provided to every student in the course. Department or unit procedures often require copies in the department or unit offices (or available online). Syllabi are provided to students before or during the first class periods.  Alternatively or in addition, syllabi may be posted online for student access.

3.2 Class Periods

Usually, class periods are equivalent to 150 minutes per week per semester for a three-credit course. Classes may be divided into three 50-minute periods, two 75-minute periods, a single meeting once a week, or some other format.  Laboratories range from one to four periods (e.g., equivalent to one to four 50 minute periods), depending upon the course.

3.2.1 Class Roster

Official class rosters are provided on MaineStreet.  The presence of a student’s name on the roster as “enrolled” indicates registration for the course (inclusive of students auditing the course) and authorization for that student to attend class. Additions and deletions to the list occur during the add-and-drop period. Students who have dropped will appear on MaineStreet as “dropped.” If a student’s name does not appear on the MaineStreet class roster, faculty should alert the office of Student Records.

3.2.2 Class Attendance

The overall policy of the University is that students are responsible for attending all class meetings for courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines the specific attendance policy for the course and makes it known to students through the course syllabus and in class during the first week of classes. Instructors may assign a lower letter grade for students’ failure to adhere to the attendance policy.

Students sometimes miss classes because of ill health, family emergency, or other reason beyond their control. It is the student’s responsibility to notify instructors of the reasons for missing class and to make arrangements for making up missed work. If absences are extensive, even for legitimate reasons, it may be impossible to meet the objectives of the course. In such instances the instructor may assign a grade of Incomplete.

Students may miss class due to authorized on- or off-campus university functions, such as varsity athletics, band, or drama.  Faculty should be notified by an appropriate entity (e.g., athletic department, music or theater department) early in the semester.

There is a policy regarding student athletes and missed classes.  Athletic schedules should be prepared so that no more than 10% of class sessions in any course will be missed due to participation in athletic events.  Last-minute changes may be necessary due to rain-outs and comparable situations.  Faculty are responsible for providing reasonable make-up work opportunities for students with bona fide excused absence for athletic participation, per the Faculty Senate resolution passed in May 1995.

3.3 Disruptive Behavior

Disruptive behavior may be subject to disciplinary action or intervention. Problems such as excessive tardiness, lack of courtesy, or other behavior inappropriate in the classroom should be discussed with the appropriate dean or director. The Associate Dean of the Graduate School is the contact for all graduate student complaints.

All crisis situations should be immediately reported to the UMaine Police at 581-4040 or 911 and to the Vice President for Student Life and Dean of Students (581-1406).  A crisis is any situation in which there is reasonable cause to suspect that there is an imminent risk to the health and safety of a student and/or UMaine community member.

In situations where staff have concerns about a student’s behavior and do not believe it constitutes a crisis, or are in doubt about whether it constitutes a crisis, the following offices may be contacted and/or consulted:

UMaine Police                                        581-4040

Vice President for Student Life                   581-1406

Counseling Center                                   581-1392

Instructors may ask disruptive students to leave their classroom at any time.

The Division of Student Life has developed a Student Behavior Review Team (SBRT), which will review any student situation that involves medical, mental health, or behavioral problems.  SBRT is a team of professionals from across the campus and across disciplines that reviews cases and recommends to the Vice President for Student Life timely responses and interventions for student situations where student behavior raises concern. The goal is always to fashion a careful and appropriate outreach or intervention to students who are struggling in or outside the classroom.  SBRT is co-chaired by the Director of the Counseling Center and the Assistant Vice President for Student Life.

More information on SBRT can be found at http://umaine.edu/studentlife/sbrt/.

If you have a concern about a UMaine student, you can contact the Assistant Vice President for Student Life at 207-581-1406 (weekdays) or at 581-4040 (24/7).  Referrals to SBRT also can be made via an online form available at: http://www.umaine.edu/studentlife/referral/.

Statements concerning disruptive behavior that a faculty member may choose to put on your syllabus can be found at:  http://umaine.edu/judicialaffairs/resources-for-faculty/.

3.4 Cheating, Plagiarism, and Academic Integrity

While rare, incidents of academic dishonesty, e.g., cheating, academic misconduct, fabrication or plagiarism, do occur at the University of Maine.  Should you suspect that there has been such a violation in one of your classes, there are several things that should be kept in mind:

1.         All incidents must be reported to the Office of Community Standards (581-1409).  This allows the campus to monitor for students who may have been involved in multiple incidents.

2.         As a faculty member you have the following options in handling the matter:

a.          You may handle it exclusively within your classroom jurisdiction.  A faculty member, of course, is the only person who may assign a failing or reduced grade as part of a sanction.

b.         You may refer the case to the appropriate Dean, the Dean of the Graduate School, or the Provost.

c.          The case may be referred to the Conduct Officer for adjudication under the UMS Student Conduct Code.  This procedure affords a greater variety of sanctions than is available to the faculty member, but cannot impact the grade awarded.

d.          You may do a combination of the above.

Complete details, including sanction guidelines and the “Academic Integrity Violation Report Form,” can be found at:  http://umaine.edu/judicialaffairs/resources-for-faculty/.  The Academic Integrity Violation Report Form describes the process in detail including information and materials to provide with the Report Form.  The form is submitted to the Office of Community Standards, Rights, and Responsibilities (OCSRR), 315 Memorial Union.

This site also has a link to the Student Honor Code published in the Student Handbook.  The violations related to academic dishonesty are listed under section III.

3.5 Examinations

Examinations are common and important assessment tools. The terminology used at the University of Maine, types of examinations given, and information on scheduling examinations follows.

Quiz. A brief examination designed to occupy only part of a class period and to cover a small fragment of work.

Prelim or Exam. An examination designed to occupy an entire class period and to cover a major unit of work.

Final. An examination given during the final exam week lasting for two hours or more.  The final examination should count for no more than one-third of the course grade, although exceptions may be made by the instructor in consultation with the chairperson of the department in which the course is offered.

No examinations of any kind may be scheduled during the last week of classes, except by permission of the appropriate Associate Dean or Director. A final examination may be scheduled only during final exam week. If a final is not planned, and the instructor wishes to schedule a prelim covering the last weeks of the course, this prelim must be given during final exam week.  These rules do not apply to Continuing Education Division courses.

Students who are scheduled for more than three final examinations in one day or have two exams scheduled at the same time may have an examination rescheduled through the Office of Student Records or by conferring with their professors.

The scheduled final exam day and time is listed on MaineStreet.

3.5.1 Types of Examinations

Instructors are free to choose the type of test offered, e.g., essay, true-false, multiple choice. Machine scoring is compatible with true-false and multiple-choice tests. The instructor usually proctors the test.  Each department makes its own arrangements for the printing or duplicating of examinations.

3.5.3 Absence from Final Examinations

A student with a legitimate reason (i.e., written or similar documentation for health or extenuating personal circumstances) for missing a regular final examination may arrange with the instructor to make up the exam.

Details on incomplete grades follow in the section “Grades and Grading.”

3.5.4 Machine Scoring of Examinations

The Faculty Development Center (149 Memorial Union) provides an optical scanning test scoring service for the faculty. Reports include information such as Frequency Distribution Item Analysis, Test Results by Student, and Student Response Report. Normally, scores are available within 24 hours of receipt of the tests. For more information go to:  http://www.umaine.edu/it/fdc/pages/scoring.php.

3.5.5 Examination File

Copies of recent final examinations for student use may be placed at the Reserve Desk in Fogler Library. Filing examination questions at the Library is optional for faculty. Fraternity or sorority houses and some dormitories may have their own examination files. Some faculty members may make previous exams available electronically.

3.6 Grades and Grading

The faculty have sole responsibility for assigning grades. Grading of college-level courses requires specific disciplinary knowledge that is gained only through advanced study in a discipline and for many fields requires constant updating of specific knowledge.  This expertise is the sole domain of the university faculty and cannot be infringed upon without negatively impacting the quality of the education of the students.

3.6.1 Approved Grading Symbols and Definitions

Complete information regarding grades and grading can be found in the Undergraduate Catalogue (http://catalog.umaine.edu/ and choose “Grades and Grading” from the topics on the right).

A condensed version follows:

The University of Maine uses a letter-grade system ranging from A to F. Faculty members have the option of adding + (no A+) and – grades to the basic letter grades, but such fine distinctions may be inappropriate for many courses. Whatever the system used, it is important to understand that there is no University-wide equivalence between percentage grades (such as 80%) and letter grades (such as B). Each instructor makes these determinations according to the grading system described in the course syllabus.

The qualitative value of the five basic letter grades is defined as follows:

  • A, Superior work.
  • B, Good work.
  • C, Satisfactory but undistinguished work.
  • D, Poor work that does not adequately prepare students for more advanced work in the discipline. While some courses completed with D grades may contribute towards the total credits needed for graduation, others may be unacceptable for certain specific requirements and within the academic major.
  • F, Failure. No credit is earned for a failed course.  If a student has not participated in at least half of the class, then the L grade is appropriate.

The grades A-F have the following numerical values used in calculating a student’s Grade Point Average (GPA):

A = 4.00 B = 3.00 C = 2.00 D = 1.00
A- = 3.67 B- = 2.67 C- = 1.67 D- = 0.67
B+ = 3.33 C+ = 2.33 D+ = 1.33 F = 0.00

The University uses a variety of grades on transcripts to designate special circumstances. These include:

  • AU, assigned only for courses taken under the audit option.
  • DG, deferred grade. This is used only for courses that extend beyond a single semester.
  • F*, for a course failed on the pass/fail grading option. No credit is earned and the GPA is not affected.
  • I, for “Incomplete.” This grade means that, in consultation with the student, the instructor has postponed the assignment of a final grade to allow the student to complete specific work not turned in before the end of the semester. Instructors assign the “I” grade only when they are persuaded that events beyond the student’s control prevented the completion of assigned work on time and when the student has participated in more than 50% of the class. If the incomplete work is not submitted within the time allotted by the faculty member, the grade will automatically be changed to an “F” grade. Students receiving an “I” grade are not allowed to re-register for the same course until the incomplete has been made up or converted to an “F” grade. A student receiving an “I” grade may not make up missed work by sitting-in on the course the next time it is taught. Refer to the Incomplete Grade and Graduation section below.
  • L, Failure for lack of participation. This grade indicates that a student participated in less than 50% of the class, but did not formally withdraw from the course. This grade counts the same as an F.
  • LP, Low Pass, for a course passed on the pass/fail grading option with a D+, D, or D. Credit is earned, but the grade point average (GPA) is not affected.
  • P, for a course passed on the pass/fail grading option with a C- or above. Credit is earned, but the grade point average (GPA) is not affected.
  • TH, final grade deferred. This is used only for the undergraduate thesis.
  • W, indicating that the student officially withdrew from the course.

3.6.2 Graduate School Grading

Normally, only a grade of A or B is acceptable for course work on a student’s program of study. A grade of C may carry graduate degree credit if a student’s advisory committee so recommends and if the Graduate School approves such an exception. No student, however, will be allowed to accumulate more than six hours of C grades on a program of study for a master’s degree, nor more than 12 hours of C grades on a program of study for a Ph.D. or Ed.D. Grades below C are not considered acceptable for any graduate student.  More information can be found in the Graduate Catalogue (http://gradcatalog.umaine.edu/ and select “General Policies” from the list on the left).

3.6.3 Submittal of Final Grades

At the end of each semester, Final Grade Rosters must be submitted on MaineStreet five days from the day of the final examination. If final papers or projects are given, Final Grade Rosters are due five days from the last day of finals week.  Prompt reporting of grades lets the Committee on Academic Standing make decisions on students’ futures and is needed for graduation processing.

Students Not Listed on Roster. If a student is attending the course but his or her name does not appear on the Grade Roster, please send an email message (from your umit.maine.edu or maine.edu account only) to grading@umit.maine.edu and include the student’s full name, student ID, course, section, number of credits, and grade.  Grades cannot be accepted via telephone.

3.6.4 Appealing Grades and Assignments

The University of Maine has formal procedures by which students may appeal the assignment of grades by an instructor, accusations of cheating or plagiarism, or certain aspects of classroom procedure.

Detailed procedures at the undergraduate level can be found at:

http://umaine.edu/handbook/academics/appealing-grades-and-assignments/

Procedures for appealing a grade at the graduate level can be found at:

http://gradcatalog.umaine.edu/content.php?catoid=28&navoid=457

3.6.5 Transfer Grades.

See transfer policy in the Undergraduate Catalogue (http://catalog.umaine.edu/ and choose “Transfer Credit” from the topics on the right).

3.6.6 Study Abroad Credits.

Students are best advised to consult both the Office of International Programs and the Department(s) to which they plan to seek approval for study abroad credits. Approval of a program of study prior to going abroad is essential.

3.6.7 FERPA

Advisors and all faculty members should be aware of FERPA (Family and Education Privacy Act), the federal law which prohibits reporting information regarding a student to others. The Associate Dean of the faculty member’s College or the Office of Equal Opportunity may also advise on what information concerning a student advisee may or may not be given out. See http://umaine.edu/handbook/policies-regulations/confidentiality-ferpa/.

3.6.8 Special Reports on Students.

Instructors may report a student in danger of academic failure to the student’s academic dean. Reports may be written or verbal. Students in danger of failure may be referred or reported to the Dean of Students, the Student Health Center, the Counseling Center, Police and Safety, the academic advisor, or the student’s academic dean.

3.7 Academic Achievement Awards

Full-time Dean’s List. The Dean’s List is prepared at the end of each semester. To be eligible for the Full-Time Dean’s List, a student must have completed 12 or more calculable credits in the semester and have earned a 3.50 or higher semester GPA.

Part-time Dean’s List.  Students who have part-time status during both the fall and spring semesters of a given academic year are eligible for Part-time Dean’s List. They must have completed 12 or more calculable credits over both terms and have earned a combined GPA in those terms of 3.50.

Presidential Scholar Award

To be eligible for the Presidential Scholar Achievement, a student must be degree-seeking and have completed 12 or more calculable credits in the semester and have earned a 4.0 semester GPA.

3.8 Textbooks and Academic Supplies

The Bookstore uses a self-service textbook selection system that allows students to search for books for their courses themselves. It is important to have complete information from each faculty member regarding course textbook needs.

How to Order Textbooks

Information for ordering from the university bookstore can be found at: http://www.bookstore.umaine.edu/

The Bookstore sets target deadline dates for ordering textbooks:  Fall and Summer Semesters: before April 30. Spring Semester: before November 1.

When a text is selected for a course, the value of used copies increases dramatically. During finals week buy-back, the Bookstore pays more for books that will be reused on campus the next semester. The goal is to maximize the number of used texts available to students. Early textbook orders allow the Bookstore time to buy books from other campuses through text wholesalers.

Special academic supplies or materials for a course also can be ordered through the Bookstore.

If a requested text is out-of-print, out-of-stock, being replaced by a new edition, or there are any other problems, the faculty member may need time to choose a replacement.

The reserve book desk of Fogler Library may make hard and electronic copies of course materials available.  Advance requests are essential.

Custom Publishing

The Bookstore is the central point for producing customized course materials. Course packets are produced at a reasonable cost. Printing Services also conducts copyright clearances and secures permissions where necessary. Faculty members provide full source information for the documents copied.

Desk Copies

Major publishers require that desk copy requests come from a faculty member and/or the department. The Bookstore maintains an up-to-date listing of publishers, addresses, phone/fax numbers, and names of sales representatives for major publishing companies.

Text Returns to Publishers

Due to increasingly restrictive return policies, unsold texts are returned to publishers after the fifth week of the semester. Students who wait this long to purchase books may find texts unavailable.

Academic Supplies

The Bookstore carries pencils, pens, notebooks, paper, rulers, highlighters, staplers, folders, report covers, special papers, poster board, fine writing instruments and many other specialty items. It also has art, engineering, and forestry supplies, both required and supplemental, for classes. Computers and software are available at the Computer Connection (located in the Bookstore).

Motion: The Faculty Senate accepts the above edits to the Faculty Handbook.

Motion Approved

 

Motion 4 to Accept Faculty Handbook Section 3.6.9

Submitted by Academic Affairs Committee

Background:

The existing policy as cited in the 1988 Faculty Handbook is:

“All grades changed by an instructor should state the reason for the change, and must be approved by the Dean of the College.  The only exception to this change is a change from an Incomplete to a letter grade (see section on change of Incomplete grades which follows.)

The purpose of this procedure is to assure that grade changes are clearly justified for academic reasons.  A change of grade should be a rarity, made only when legitimate mistakes such as computational errors, cause the initial grade to be incorrect.  Change of Grade cards (YELLOW CARDS) are available in the Dean’s Office.  After the card has all the appropriate signatures, it is forwarded by the Dean’s Office to the Registrar’s Office.”

Why change?

The policy needs to be changed to reflect the move from cards to MaineStreet.  Work on this change began over two years ago.  The Academic Affairs Committee met with representatives from Student Records and the associate deans.  The previous Associate Provost worked with us.  We had faculty senate input.  The changes were supported by the Provost (at the time) and Associate Provost (at the time).

Two significant changes are:

1.         The six month window before a grade change must get approval.  That was designed to cover the next semester when grade entry or calculation errors are most likely to be discovered.  It was negotiated with and agreed to by the associate deans. After six months any proposed grade change will be reviewed, but a potential denial by a dean or dean’s designee can be appealed to a faculty group.

2.         Final appeal of a rejection of a change of grade resides with a faculty group.  This was a demand of the faculty:  grades are a faculty decision.

The policy was approved by all groups last spring, but the actual motion to approve was tabled to support “work to rule.”

In December it was brought forward but was not voted on because the final arbiter was not a group that could do that.  That has been changed.

The Provost did not support the policy put forward last December.  He has not discussed this policy with the Academic Affairs Committee.

Recommendation

The recommended language for Section 3.6.9 is as follows:

3.6.9  Change of Grade Policy

Instructors desiring to change a grade after official posting should submit a grade change request to the MaineStreet Grade Roster.  Normally, grade changes are a result of clerical errors or errors of omission.  Grade changes made beyond six months of the end of a semester require approval from the Dean or designee.  If the faculty member wants to appeal the decision of the Dean or Dean’s designee, the Provost will convene an ad hoc committee consisting of three full professors, at least one of whom must be from the faculty member’s college and one of whom must be from another college.  The decision of this review committee shall be final.

When entering the grade change on MaineStreet, the instructor should enter a brief written rationale containing their reasons for wanting to change the grade.

If a student wishes to improve a grade, then the option to repeat the course should be considered.  For policy regarding incomplete grades, please see the incomplete grade policy in this catalogue.

Motion:  The Faculty Senate accepts section 3.6.9 as written above as an addition to the Faculty Handbook.

Motion Approved


MOTION 5

Motions to Eliminate the Master of Public Administration and Bachelor of Arts in Public Management

Submitted by Program Creation & Reorganization Review Committee (PCRRC)

Background:

Both degrees were part of the former Department of Public Administration. The proposed eliminations resulted from the APPWG process of 2010, with much discussion documented in the PCRRC archive of 2010/2011. The Department of Public Administration was closed in June 2012.  The two program elimination proposals were submitted to the Faculty Senate on June 13, 2013.  Program eliminations were put on hold by the Faculty Senate during contract settlements last semester, and thus delayed. The open meeting for both eliminations was held on April 25, 2014. Dean Ivan Manev of the Maine Business School provided a detailed history of the elimination of the Department of Public Administration and the respective degree programs.  There were no comments made against the elimination of the programs.

Motion: The Faculty Senate supports the recommendation of the PCRRC to eliminate the Master of Public Administration (MPA) from the former Department of Public Administration.

Motion: The Faculty Senate supports the recommendation of the PCRRC to eliminate the B.A. in Public Management from the former Department of Public Administration.

Motion Approved

 

MOTION 6

Motion to Eliminate the Masters of Music in Conducting from the School of Performing Arts

Submitted by Program Creation & Reorganization Review Committee (PCRRC)

Background: The program elimination of the Masters of Music in Conducting was initiated through the APWWG process in 2010.  The proposal for program elimination was submitted to the PCRRC on February 11, 2013, recommending the elimination of the self-standing graduate degree in Conducting, in favor of sub-plans to be offered within the Masters of Music in Music Education degree. The open meeting for consideration of the proposal was held on April 28, 2014 with four people in attendance.  Beth Wiemann, School of Performing Arts, provided a summary and history of the proposal.  The alternative to the self-standing graduate degree in Conducting was considered preferable based on anticipated reduction of tenure-track positions due to retirements.  Discussion by those present at the open meeting focused on the problem of program loss due to retirement, but without alternative plans to the present proposal for elimination.

Motion:  The Faculty Senate supports the recommendation of the PCRRC to eliminate the Masters of Music in Conducting from the School of Performing Arts.

Motion Approved

 

MOTION 7

Motion 7 to Accept Faculty Handbook Chapter 6

Submitted by Financial and Institutional Planning Committee (FIPC)

Chapter 6: Helpful Information and Resources

6.1 MaineCard

The MaineCard is the University of Maine identification card. Cards are available in the MaineCard office in basement of the Memorial Union (581-CARD). The office is open from 7:30-4:00 Monday through Friday. Faculty, staff, and full- and part-time students are eligible to use the MaineCard at many areas around campus. It is the only ID card needed on campus. If appropriate fees are paid, the MaineCard serves as a pass to facilities such as Recreational Sports, the Alfond Arena, and the Athletic Ticket Office. The MaineCard is required to check out books from Fogler Library, access many UM online databases, and copy machines in the library take the MaineCard as well. The MaineCard may also be used as a debit card for printing, at dining services and in the bookstore. The card may be “charged” online, at MaineCard Services at 130 Memorial Union or at other campus locations. Further details about the card are available online at www.umaine.edu/mainecard.

6.2 Parking on Campus

To park on campus, all motor vehicles must display a valid parking permit, valid state registration plate(s), valid state inspection sticker, and be in operable condition.

A fee is charged for parking permits and an application is available online at www.umaine.edu/parking/. Permits are also available from 7:30-4:00 Monday-Friday at the MaineCard Services (581-2273) located at 130 Memorial Union. Temporary visitor permits valid for one day can be obtained during the weekdays from MaineCard Services in 130 Memorial Union, Bear Necessities in Alfond Arena and the Visitor Center in Buchanan Alumni House or at any time at the UMaine Police Department.

A map of parking areas is available online at www.umaine.edu/locator/. Parking lots are color-coded and may be used only by those holding appropriate parking decals. Vehicles parked in violation of the parking rules are subject to impoundment and towing at the owner’s expense with no notification. For assistance after hours and on weekends, call the Public Safety Dispatcher at 581- 4040.

Full details on parking rules on campus are available online at http://umaine.edu/parking/rules-regulations/.

6.3 Campus Mail

Campus mail is used for internal university communications; no postage is necessary. The University pays non-campus mail postal charges only for mail that is essential to the programs and activities of the institution. Personal mail and private business mail require postage paid by the sender. U.S. postal boxes are conveniently located on campus, and there is a full-service post office in Memorial Union.

United States mail and campus mail are delivered in each campus building once each day. Outgoing University mail is collected in each building daily and is taken to the mailroom in the Public Affairs Building. Official University mail for delivery off campus should have an account number. This mail is processed in the Service Building with the cost assigned to the specific department. Use of the University postage meter for personal or private business mail is strictly prohibited.

Overnight mail services available from the campus include Federal Express and United Parcel Service. The Purchasing Department (581-2695) supplies information on locations, pick up times, and envelopes.

Tampering with campus or U.S. mail should be reported to Public Safety (581-4040), which will contact the Postal Inspectors as appropriate.

6.4 Telecommunications

The Telecommunication division of University Services – Information Technologies (IT) offers services ranging from voice telephone to video conferencing. Telecommunication is undergoing a reorganization as responsibilities are shifted from the University of Maine to the University of Maine System.

Telephones are programmed before they are installed and a user’s manual is available through the Information Technologies (http://www.umaine.edu/it/divisions/telecom/).  Changes to existing telephones require a departmental request or an IT work order.

An authorization code, typically obtained by departmental chairs for new faculty, is required to place a long distance phone call. Cellular phones may be purchased or rental through the telecommunication division.

Additional details on telecommunication services and procedures can be obtained by reviewing the Information Technologies web site (http://www.umaine.edu/it/divisions/telecom/) or calling 581-1600.

6.5 Faculty Pay Schedule

Full-time and part-time regular faculty members receive their salary in twelve equal installments, September through August. Part-time temporary faculty teaching on a contract-per-course basis receive salary in September, October, November, and December for Fall semester courses and January, February, March, April, and May for Spring semester courses. Paychecks are issued on the last business day of the month. Paychecks may be deposited directly into a bank account if arrangements are made with the Payroll Office.

The Payroll Office is part of the Office of Human Resources and is located at 142 Corbett Hall (Phone: 581-1581). Forms including direct deposits, federal and state W-4, and request for summer salary retirement contributions can be obtained from the Office of Human Resources Payroll website (http://umaine.edu/hr/hr-resources/payroll/).

6.6 Childcare Facilities on Campus

A range of childcare services is available to faculty, staff, and students at the University of Maine. A waiting list is maintained for all programs.

The University of Maine’s Children’s Center (581-4076) offers full-time licensed childcare for children six weeks through five years old. The Center is open from 7:30-5:30, Monday through Friday, for fifty-one weeks per year. Private fee childcare slots are reserved for University affiliated families . Further information is available online at http://www.umaine.edu/childrencenter/.

The Child Study Center (581-3272) follows the University Calender (14 week sessions during fall and spring semesters) and offers three options for half-day preschool programs for children between two-and-a-half and six years of age. It is open from 7:45-5:00 on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, and from 7:45-noon on Tuesday and Thursday. Online information is available at http://umaine.edu/psychology/child-study-center/.

The Child Development Learning Center (581-3123) offers both nursery school and prekindergarten programs for children between 33 months and five years of age. The Child Development Learning Center follows the University calendar, operating for 14 weeks during the fall and spring semesters. Online information is available at http://umaine.edu/edhd/professionals/katherine-m-durst-child-development-learning-center/.

6.7 University Housing

A limited number of one and two bedroom apartment units for students, faculty, and staff are located in University Park in Old Town, one mile from the University of Maine campus. Pets are not allowed in these units. The University Park Office (581-4854) handles the rentals. There is normally a waiting list for these apartments. Current rates, photographs, and other details are available online at http://umaine.edu/housing/family-housing/.

The Commuter and Non-Traditional Student Program (581-1734) maintains a database of house listings, provides a model lease, and legal lists resources for renters. These resources are available at http://umaine.edu/cntsp/housing/

6.8 Auditoriums and Performance Spaces

6.8.1 Collins Center for the Arts (Hutchins Concert Hall)

The Collins Center for the Arts (Hutchins Concert Hall), dedicated in September 1986, with a major front of house renovation in 2007-2008, is the cultural focus of the University of Maine campus and the surrounding region. Hutchins Concert Hall is a multi-use space that seats 1,435 people. As a part of the University of Maine campus in Orono, Hutchins hosts a wide variety of events, presenting classical and contemporary music, dance, theater, comedy, ceremonies, and lectures. The Hutchins Concert Hall has two basic configurations to accommodate the variety of events presented: The theater/dance mode and the orchestral configuration. Complete information about the current performance season, including ticketing, is available online at http://www.collinscenterforthearts.com/

Contact information

Collins Center for the Arts
5746 Collins Center for the Arts
Orono, ME 04469 Box Office: 207-581-1755
FAX: 207-581-1837

The Collins Center for the Arts (MCA) also houses the Hudson Museum. Open from 9:00-4:00 Monday through Friday and 11:00-4:00 on Saturday. The Hudson Museum maintains a collection of over 8,000 ethnographic and archaeological objects including a world class assemblage of 2,828 Precolumbian ceramics, lithics and gold work dating from 2000 BC to the time of the Spanish Conquest. This collection is complemented by contemporary ethnographic objects from Mexico, Guatemala and Panama.

The North American collection includes Native American and Native Alaskan objects from the Northwest Coast, Arctic, Plains, Southwest and Northeast. The Maine Native American collection boasts 400 objects, including the largest institutional collection of Penobscot basket making tools in the region. Southwestern holdings include historic Pueblo pottery, Hopi kachinas, Navajo textiles, Pima and Havasupai basketry, Navajo and Zuni silverwork and contemporary art. Arctic holdings feature ethnographic clothing, tools and weapons.

The Museum displays several temporary exhibits each academic year. The Museum offers guided tours for University classes, lectures by distinguished anthropologists and archaeologists, staff assistance with directed research projects, internships, and teaching exhibits. Online information is available at http://umaine.edu/hudsonmuseum/

6.8.2 Other Auditoriums and Theatres

Information is available at https://umaine.edu/spa/facilities/

6.8.3 Minsky Music Recital Hall

A 276-seat recital hall, Minsky is primarily used by the Music Division for faculty recitals, ensemble performances and student recitals. The Theatre/Dance division uses the space for a fall dance showcase of works in progress and has held staged readings. https://umaine.edu/thearts/museums-facilities/minsky-recital-hall/

6.8.3 Hauck Auditorium

The 546-seat Hauck Auditorium is the main location for student plays and dance recitals. It is the main stage for the School of Performing Arts.

 6.8.4 The Al Cyrus Pavilion Theatre

An 89-seat 3/4 round theatre. The Pavilion is on the National Registry of Historic Buildings and was renovated from a livestock judging space. Some departmental shows are produced in the Pavilion, but it is mainly used for thesis and other student productions, including the popular Underdog and Upperdog performances.

6.9 Museum of Art

The Museum of Art of the University of Maine is located in Norumbega Hall on Central Street in downtown Bangor. One of the oldest and most distinguished land-grant university collections in the country, permanent holdings include nearly 6,000 works of art. Faculty may request artwork for their offices through the Museum (561-3350). Open Monday through Friday 10am-5pm. Further information on the museum is available online at http://umma.umaine.edu/

40 Harlow Street
Bangor, ME 04401-5102

6.10 Recreational Facilities and Athletics

The University has an extensive number of recreational facilities: the Memorial Gym, Lengyel Gym, New Balance Student Recreation Center, Alfond Arena, and the Maine Bound Adventure Center. Recreational facilities are provided for students, faculty, and employees of the University of Maine. Student fees allow them access to recreational facilities. Faculty, employees, and the public may purchase membership passes that entitle them to similar privileges. Spouse and family passes are also available. Passes may be purchased New Balance Student Recreation Center. Online information is available at https://umaine.edu/campusrecreation/facilities/

Student intercollegiate athletics at the University of Maine include most major varsity sports, i.e., baseball, basketball, cross country, football, ice hockey, soccer, swimming/diving, and track and field for men and basketball, cross country, field hockey, ice hockey, soccer, softball, swimming/diving, track and field, and volleyball for women. A complete schedule of University student athletics is available online at www.goblackbears.com/schedule/thisweek/index.html. Ticket information for University athletic events is also available online at http://www.goblackbears.com/landing/index or by calling 581- BEAR.

6.11   Reserved

6.12 University Information Technologies

6.12.1 Information Technologies (IT) at the University of Maine

Information Technologies is undergoing a reorganization as responsibilities shift from the University of Maine to University Services Information Technologies administered by the University of Maine System.  The Computer Connection and the Repair Center are administered by Auxiliary Services at the University of Maine.

The Department of Information Technologies (IT) works closely with faculty, students, and staff to plan and implement facilities to ensure the University’s technological infrastructure. At the University of Maine, IT encompasses a variety of functions. Those related to computers include networking services, public clusters, andthe Computer Connection, the Help Center., the Faculty Development Center, and the Repair Center. Audio Visual Services, Video Production Technical Services, Training and Education Services, and Telecommunications Services also fall under IT’s mission. IT  at UMaine provides information on First Class, Antivirus, Blackboard, @maine.edu, wireless network and Passwords. http://www.umaine.edu/it/

6.12.2 First Class

FirstClass offers campus-wide Macintosh and Windows point and click interface, personal e-mail, public and private electronic conferencing and discussion groups, Netnews and ListServ subscription services, online chatting with other users, and localized user support and training. Information on FirstClass is available at http://www.umaine.edu/it/services/descriptions/firstclass-email.php and http://www.umaine.edu/it/software/firstclass/

6.12.3 Computer Connection

The Computer Connection (581-2580) is the campus computer store. Low-cost computer equipment and peripherals are available to the campus community.  Computer Connection is located in the bookstore of the Memorial Union.    https://www.umaine.edu/computerconnection/.

6.12.4 Help Center

The Help Center (581-2506) provides personal, e-mail, and telephone consultation on operating system, network connection, and common software problems for personal computers and peripherals. It also provides limited on-site support for software configuration problems and resources and assistance in use of specialized graphics processing equipment. See http://www.umaine.edu/it/helpcenter/

 6.12.5 Computer Repair Center

The personal computer and peripherals Repair Center (581-3282) provides bench-based, on-site repair and warranty support services for the campus and the Computer Connection at reasonable prices.  Further information is available online at http://www.umaine.edu/it/divisions/repair/.

 6.12.6 Other Information Technologies Services

The Information Technologies web site http://www.umaine.edu/it/services/ gives further information on other services the department offers including audiovisual and video services, networking, telecommunications, equipped classrooms, and workshops and seminars.

6.13 Fogler Library

The Raymond H. Fogler Library is the largest library in the state. Library collections are available online at http://www.library.umaine.edu/.

6.13.1 URSUS

URSUS is the online catalog (http://www.library.umaine.edu/default_ursus.asp) of the University of Maine System libraries and other participating libraries, such as the Maine State Law and Legislative Reference Library and Bangor Public Library. URSUS contains directories of the majority of print and non-print materials, including books, serials, microforms, sound recordings, maps, government documents, and other audiovisual formats. Combined collections total over one million bibliographic records and over two million volumes. URSUS provides location and status information and a bibliographic description of each item.

6.13.2 Mariner

Mariner, with URL http://libraries.maine.edu/mariner/, is the gateway to electronic information created and maintained at the seven campuses of the University of Maine System Libraries. It provides access to Web sites and other online resources available through the UMS Libraries, the Maine State Library, Bangor Public Library, and the Maine State Law and Legislative Reference Library.

6.13.3 Library Checkout Privileges

Fogler Library is open for use to members of the university community and the public. Checkout privileges are reserved for students, faculty, and staff of the University of Maine System and Maine residents who apply for courtesy borrowing. The MaineCard is required for checkout; it must be linked to the library database to be valid. The Circulation desk at the library desk activates the MaineCard for first-time checkout of library materials. Faculty may check out most books for a semester; renewal is required to hold material longer than the initial period.

6.13.4 Interlibrary Loan

Items not held by Fogler Library are available through Interlibrary Loan. Services are limited to University of Maine faculty, staff, students, and corporate/research cardholders. Request forms may be submitted electronically, in person, or by mail.

Fogler Library now distributes a weekly newsletter via email to faculty. Anyone wishing not to receive this mailing may request that it not be sent. The Newsletter contains weekly items of interest to faculty members, updates on acquisitions or budget, and other items.

6.14 Recycling

Paper is the number one recyclable material generated in offices and classrooms campus-wide. Each office and classroom has one or more blue or green “Paper Only” recycling bins. All paper products are collected in the paper recycling bins. For additional information about recycling on campus see http://umaine.edu/ofm/campus-services/recycling/.

6.15 Presidential Achievement Awards

The President of the University of Maine recognizes faculty for outstanding and distinguished service. Three achievement awards may be given each academic year to faculty or professional staff. Each awardee receives a medallion and $1500 at the Honors Convocation. Faculty or professional staff who receive a medallion may wear it at all official functions of the University. https://umaine.edu/provost/awards-recognitions/

6.15.1 Presidential Research and Creative Achievement Award

A faculty member who has attained distinction in research or creative achievement may receive this annual award. During the spring semester, the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs solicits nominations. The Faculty Research Funds Committee reviews them and then makes recommendations to the President.

6.15.2 Presidential Outstanding Teaching Award

A tenured University of Maine faculty member who has demonstrated outstanding commitment to and ability in teaching, while maintaining a commitment to scholarship and public service may receive this annual award. The Provost solicits nominations during the spring semester. A committee of faculty, students, and administrators reviews the nominations and then makes recommendations to the President.

6.15.3 Presidential Public Service Achievement Award

A faculty or professional staff member who has demonstrated distinguished public service may receive this annual award. During the spring semester, the Provost solicits nominations. A committee of faculty and professional representatives screens the nominations and then makes recommendations to the President.

6.16  Teaching Services

6.16.1 Center for Excellence in Teaching and Assessment

The Center for Excellence in Teaching and Assessment, 229 Alumni Hall, is a resource for faculty. Its mission is to foster excellence in teaching and learning at the University of Maine. http://www.umaine.edu/teaching/

6.16.2 Faculty Development Center

The Faculty Development Center (581-1925) is a help center specifically for supporting faculty who wish to integrate technology into their courses. It provides several high-end workstations and a staff to work with faculty. Seminars and grants are offered through the Center to assist faculty in completing technology projects. Online information is available at http://www.umaine.edu/fdc/.

6.16.3 Advance Rising Tide Center

Provide support for effective policies, programs, and professional development opportunities aimed at the recruitment, retention, and advancement of women faculty.

Motion Approved

 

RESOLUTION

Resolution by the University of Maine Faculty Senate

to University of Maine System and the Board of Trustees concerning

Financial Sustainability and Academic Excellence

Whereas:

  • For FY 13, FY 14 and FY 15, the State of Maine has held appropriations to the University of Maine System flat or with small net reductions and The University of Maine System Board of Trustees, froze tuition and fee revenue for in-state undergraduate students for three years (FY 13, FY 14 and FY 15)

Whereas

  • The impact of System-wide services consolidation and financial re-distribution thus far seem to have had a negative impact on our academic mission, our students, our staff and our faculty at the University of Maine.

Whereas:

  • Past declines in enrollment at UMaine prior to 2012 and consistently throughout the University of Maine System, catalyzed by the declining high school demographic, resulted in significant revenue loss.

Whereas:

  • It is critical that the faculty and staff receive salaries, salary increases and benefits that must be budgeted.

Whereas:

  • Our strategic plan, called The Blue Sky Plan, was created as a growth model to develop new financial resources in support of academic and research excellence that has addressed about 47% the total structural gap

Whereas:

  • The Chancellor has called for new and significant System changes to close the gap.

Resolution:

We therefore call on the Chancellor of the University of Maine System and the Board of Trustees of the University of Maine System to:

  • Recognize more fully the potentially negative impact on our students, staff and faculty of system wide initiatives that ultimately destabilize and disrupt academics and services at the Flagship campus of the University of Maine System without more substantive, critical and open examination in consultation with the UMaine community to ensure that the national stature of the University of Maine is not diminished.
  • Stand in partnership with the UMaine leadership of the President and Cabinet in addressing the FY 15 budget challenges, while attempting to limit the negative impact on UMaine’s tripartite mission of teaching, research, and service.
  • Move more expeditiously and substantively to develop and propose a course of action that will define specifically how the System will increase public support for and investment in higher education, reduce costs and still maintain mission excellence at the campus level. The UMaine Faculty Senate would be pleased to participate in such substantive and visionary planning.
  • Ensure through future planning that the success achieved by Maine’s Flagship University in advancing its truly international academic and research reputation is not diminished by any System goals and actions inconsistent with the University of Maine’s unique mission and excellence or substantive funding requirements as a nationally ranked, land grant research university.
  • Stand in support of our successful strategic planning effort both now and in the future as a model in setting a course of financial sustainability and academic excellence for UMS.

Resolution Approved

Response to May 8 2014 meeting

 


Back to Motions Passed

Faculty Senate
Kimberly Junkins, Faculty Senate Office
205 East Annex, Orono, Maine 04469
Phone: (207) 581-1167 | Fax: (207) 581-2640
E-mail: kimberly.junkins@umit.maine.edu
The University of Maine
Orono, Maine 04469
207.581.1865