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Faculty and Researchers

Hal Borns

Professor Emeritus

Hal Borns

George Denton

Professor

George Denton

Brenda Hall

Professor

Email: brendah@maine.edu

My interests include the origin of ice ages and abrupt climate change and the behavior of ice sheets. Typically, I combine intensive glacial geologic field work with isotopic analyses to obtain chronologies of past glacial and climate fluctuations.

Gordon Bromley

Research Associate

Gordon Bromley

Aaron Putnam

Research Associate

Aaron Putnam

Aaron Putnam

I am interested in the late-Quaternary history of glaciers and climate, specifically during and since the last ice age.  I use 10Be surface-exposure dating and radiocarbon dating to determine the age of glacial landforms that mark the extents of former glaciers.  From this information we can quantify regional changes in past atmospheric temperatures using snowline reconstructions and glaciological modeling.  Field areas include: Southern Alps, New Zealand; Patagonian Andes; Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada, western USA; Tien Shan and Tarim Basin, Xinjiang, China; Scottish Highlands.  Previous field projects have involved fieldwork in northern Maine, northern Alaska, the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, and the southern Transantarctic Mountains, Antarctica.

Charlie Porter

Research Associate

Charlie Porter


 

Graduate Students

Scott Braddock

M.S. Student

Email: scott.braddock@maine.edu

 

My research will focus on a reconstruction of past Holocene water temperature variation for the Ross Sea region, Antarctica, using stable isotopes of scallop shells. I will also be looking at seal remains that date back a few thousand years to try and relate changes in seal species to changing climatic conditions in this area.

Research interests also include an ongoing project in the Peruvian Andes using helium dating of glacial erratics to determine the ages of moraines. The significance of this project is to relate past ice-margin fluctuations with accessibility to local resources for paleoindian age people. I have also been involved in a project using ground-penetrating radar in Juneau, Alaska, to help with mass balance studies in the region.

Brenda Chase

M.S. Student

 

My research interests include glacial geology, paleoecology, palynology and paleolimnology.  My current project uses fossilized pollen as a proxy to reconstruct temperature, precipitation and vegetation profiles for eastern Maine during the last deglaciation.

 

 Jennifer Lennon

M.S. Student

 

Email: jennifer.lennon@maine.edu

I’m a first year Master’s student working with George Denton and Brenda Hall. My research focuses on the timing of the Last Glacial Maximum in the Southern Hemisphere, and I’ll be doing field work in Tierra del Fuego in the spring of 2013.

Toby Koffman

PhD Student

Email: toby.koffman@hotmail.com

My current research focus is on the timing of deglaciation in the southern hemisphere since the last glacial maximum. I am working with Professor Brenda Hall to better constrain the timing of the retreat of the Antarctic Ice Sheet from the Ross Sea, using radiocarbon and uranium series methods to date ice-marginal lake and pond deposits from Antarctica’s Miers valley. Under the direction of Professor George Denton I am building a moraine chronology for New Zealand’s Rakaia Valley, using beryllium-10 surface exposure dating.

 

Courtney King

M.S. Student


 

Colin Dowey

M.S. Student



Peter Strand

M.S. Student

Email: peter.strand@maine.edu

I am currently a MS student with George Denton. My research involves reconstructing past climate variability and glacial chronologies using surface-exposure dating techniques, mainly in the Southern Hemisphere. I am also interested in the roles played by changing oceanic and atmospheric circulations in the climate system.

Undergraduates

 

 

 

 

 

 


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