Skip Navigation
Return to Layout View | Home | A-Z Directory | my UMaine | MaineStreet | Campus Map | Calendar
Follow UMaine on Twitter | Join UMaine on Facebook | Watch UMaine on YouTube | Admissions | Parents & Family | Apply | Give Now | Emergency

Cooperative Extension in Cumberland County


Site Navigation:


Maine Sea Grant to Help Run Maine Seaweed Festival, The Forecaster Reports

The Forecaster reported the University of Maine’s Maine Sea Grant program is partnering with Hillary Krapf, a holistic healer in Portland, to host the first Maine Seaweed Festival to celebrate the many practical functions of Maine seaweed. The free festival will be held Aug. 30 at Southern Maine Community College in South Portland. The Bangor Daily News carried The Forecaster’s report.

AP Quotes Bolton in Article on Lobster Processing Plant Violations

Jason Bolton, a food safety specialist with the University of Maine School of Food and Agriculture, spoke to the Associated Press for an article about Rockland-based Linda Bean’s lobster processing plant stating it has addressed violations cited by the Food and Drug Administration in February. The FDA says it has not yet cleared the firm of violations, according to the article. Bolton told the AP that Bean contacted him for help addressing some of the FDA’s concerns. “In every conversation I had with their plant manager and their chief financial officer, they were very willing to work with me,” Bolton said. Portland Press Herald, Boston Herald and The Boston Globe carried the AP report.

Morse Mentioned in Forecaster Article on Green Crabs

Dana Morse, a Maine Sea Grant researcher who works at the University of Maine’s Darling Marine Center, was quoted in The Forecaster’s article, “Even in retreat, green crabs confound Maine shellfish industry.” Morse said there is a small, but motivated group in the state looking for ways to market the crabs. He added one idea — that hasn’t yet panned out — is to use the crabs as bait for the conch fishing industry in Massachusetts.

UMaine Mentioned in Press Herald, BDN Articles on Tick Increase

The University of Maine was mentioned in articles by the Portland Press Herald and Bangor Daily News on climate change and the increase of ticks and Lyme disease. Both reports referenced a question on the November ballot that will ask voters to approve an $8 million bond that would support a laboratory administered by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension for monitoring Lyme disease and other health threats related to mosquitoes, bed bugs and ticks. Research from UMaine’s Climate Change Institute also was referenced in the BDN article. A clinical research associate at the Maine Medical Center Research Institute, which tracks tick populations in the state, said CCI research shows the state will grow significantly warmer by 2050.

UMaine Extension Provides Training for Volunteer Cooks

University of Maine Cooperative Extension will offer a food safety workshop for volunteer cooks, 1–5 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 18, at the University of Maine Regional Learning Center, 75 Clearwater Drive, Suite 104, Falmouth.

Cooking for Crowds offers up-to-date information about safely handling, preparing, storing and transporting food for large groups of people, including at soup kitchens, church suppers, food pantries and community fundraisers. The class meets the Good Shepherd Food Bank safety training requirements.

Cost is $15; partial scholarships are available. Register online by Sept. 11. For more information or to request a disability accommodation, call 207.781.6099 or 1.800.287.1471 (in Maine). To receive notice of other educational opportunities, email extension.rlreception@maine.edu.

Welcome Lynne Hazelton and Lexi Hall

UMaine Extension Cumberland welcomes two new members to its team.

Lynne Hazelton (right) has been providing temporary program support for the last 7 month and has accepted the permanent position going forward. We are thrilled and happy to have her on on board!

Lexi Hall (left) started her position as the new admin clerk yesterday. She will be the voice behind the phone and staff the front desk.

Welcome Lynne and Lexi!

 

Image Description: Lexi Hall (right) and Lynne Hazelton (left)

Maine AgrAbility Featured in WABI Report

WABI (Channel 5) reported on Maine AgrAbility, a USDA grant-funded state program that helps farmers with chronic health conditions and disabilities gain more control of their lives, continue to farm successfully and live independently. The program is a nonprofit collaboration of University of Maine Cooperative Extension, Goodwill Industries of Northern New England and Alpha One. The report focused on a farmer in Winterport who was helped by the program. Richard Brzozowski, project director of Maine AgrAbility and a small ruminant and poultry specialist with UMaine Extension, told WABI “You don’t look at the disability part. You think of what they can do; the ability part.”

UMaine Extension Mentioned in Press Herald Article on Organic Hops

The University of Maine Cooperative Extension was mentioned in a Portland Press Herald article about changes in U.S. Department of Agriculture standards that require organic beer to be brewed with organic hops and how those changes are inspiring more Maine brewers to grow hops. According to the article, UMaine Extension is testing several organic hop varieties to see which thrive and can make tasty brews in Maine.

Channel 5 – UMaine Program Helps Farmers With Disabilities

Channel 5 heads to Winterport to talk with farmer Che Sweetland and UMaine Extension Educator, Richard Brozowski about the AgrAbility project. Maine AgrAbility is a non-profit collaboration of the University of Maine Cooperative ExtensionGoodwill Industries of Northern New England, and Alpha One; Maine AgrAbility is part of a nationwide network of United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) programs begun through the 1990 Farm Bill. The goal of the National AgrAbility Project is to inform, educate, and assist farmers, ranchers, farm workers, and their families with disabilities, so they can continue to have successful careers in agriculture.

To see the video, visit: http://wabi.tv/2014/08/18/umaine-program-helps-farmers-disabilities/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=umaine-program-helps-farmers-disabilities

Image Description: AgrAbility-Logo

Image Description: wrksticker-1-250x250

New Publication: Facts About Leaf Color in Maine

Originally adapted from Why Leaves Change Color, USDA Forest Service FS 12, February 1967. Revised by James Philp, Extension forestry specialist – wood products, July 2001.Revised by Kathryn Hopkins, Extension Professor, August 2014. Reviewed by Dr. Abby van den Berg, Research Assistant Professor in Plant Biology, University of Vermont Proctor Maple Research Center, August 2014.


“It doesn’t take much imagination to picture Nature going about on autumn days and painting the leaves of trees and other plants red, purple, orange, and yellow. Every fall, we delight in the beauty of the trees and shrubs, knowing that it is only a passing pleasure. Before long, the leaves will fall from the trees and become part of the rich carpet that covers the forest floor, providing nutrition for new forest growth. Many people suppose that frost causes the color change, but it does not. Some of the leaves begin to change color before we have had any frost.”

To read the rest of this publication visit: extension.umaine.edu/publications/7078e/

Find more of our publications and books at extensionpubs.umext.maine.edu.

 

Image Description: autumn-leaves


Sidebar

Donate Now

University of Maine Cooperative Extension


Contact Information

Cooperative Extension in Cumberland County
75 Clearwater Drive, Suite 104
Falmouth, Maine 04105
Phone: 207.781.6099 or 1.800.287.1471 (in Maine)E-mail: extension.cumberland@maine.edu
The University of Maine
Orono, Maine 04469
207.581.1110
A Member of the University of Maine System