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Cooperative Extension: Cranberries


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Cranberry Facts and History

The Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) is native to the swamps and bogs of northeastern North America. It belongs to the Heath, or Heather family (Ericaceae), which is a very widespread family of about 125 genera and about 3500 species!  Members of the family occur from polar regions to the tropics in both hemispheres. The cranberry plant is described as a low-growing, woody perennial with small, oval leaves borne on fine, vine-like shoots. Horizontal stems, or runners, grow along the soil surface, rooting at intervals to form a dense mat.  Its flower buds, formed on short, upright shoots, open from May to June and produce ripe fruit in late September to early October.  In Maine, blossoms appear during the 1st to 2nd week of June, and berries are usually not fully ripe until the first week of October, which is when most Maine growers begin to harvest their beds.

[The following is taken partially from the "Cranberry Agriculture In Maine: Grower’s Guide - 1996 version"]:

The American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) grows wild from the mountains of Georgia to the Canadian Maritimes, and as far west as Minnesota. It has been cultivated in the Cape Cod area since the early 1800s and was an active industry in Maine during much of the last century. The cultivated cranberry industry then spread to New Jersey by the 1830s, Wisconsin by the 1850s, and the Pacific Northwest by the 1880s. Many Maine farms with suitable land produced small plots of cranberries, mostly for home use and a small marketable surplus. The Maine commercial cranberry industry was virtually eliminated in the early 1900s by a combination of factors, including lack of adequate technology for frost protection, the spread of disease and pests, depressed demand during World War I, the increasing trend toward specialized farming, the replacement of fresh cranberries in the market with the new canned cranberry sauce, and its relative distance to markets. Cranberry production is a vital new industry in the State of Maine. It is a ‘new’ industry in the sense that it represents the rebirth of an industry that left the State in the first half of this century and until 1988 there were no commercial producers in the state. 1991 saw Maine’s first modern commercial harvest and by 1992 there were at least five growers with planted vines and several new plantations under development. There are now, as of 2010, thirty commercial cranberry farms in the state, with roughly 190 acres (mostly in Washington County), plus two or three brand new cranberry plantings planned for 2011.

A Little Cranberry History



Cranberry questions? Contact Charles Armstrong, Cranberry Professional. University of Maine Cooperative Extension.
Pest Management Office || 491 College Avenue || Orono, ME 04473-1295 || Tel: 207.581.2967 [email: charles.armstrong@maine.edu]

Image Description: picture of a Maine cranberry with an oval frame effect applied to it for artsy purposes

Image Description: An outline of the State of Maine, filled in with a picture of Maine cranberries (clicking it sends the user to UMaine Extension's Cranberry Home Page)

Image Description: picture of some Maine cranberries in bloom

Image Description: Closeup of a pair of Maine cranberries (Stevens variety) in Troy


Additional Links


Contact Information

Cooperative Extension: Cranberries
5741 Libby Hall
Orono, Maine 04469-5741
Phone: 207.581.3188, 1.800.287.0274 (in Maine) or 1.800.287.8957 (TDD)E-mail: extension@maine.edu
The University of Maine
Orono, Maine 04469
207.581.1865