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Cultural Management - 253-Cultural Management for Insects and Diseases in Wild Blueberries

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Fact Sheet No.253

Prepared by David E. Yarborough, Extension Blueberry Specialist, The University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469.  May 1994. Revised July 2004.

Insects Method Comments
Blueberry Maggot Harvesting Harvesting techniques that reduce fruit loss can minimize the number of infected fruit left on the plants and on the ground. Avoid edges as higher infestations occur there.  Allowing infected fruit to drop before harvest will increase fly populations and future losses.
Clean Winnow Piles Compost, burn or dispose of winnower refuse or hot spots of fly emergence will be created.
Keep all fields in same cycle Since 90% of the flies emerge from the previous crop field, having all fields in the same locale will deny flies fruit and reduce maggot infestation.
Flea beetle, Spanworm,
Sawfly, Tip midge
Fire pruning Blueberry litter must be ignited, if too wet then will have incomplete sanitation.
Thrips Fire pruning Burn curled stems as soon as extensive curling occurs in early spring but before June 1.
BioControl Spanworm
BT(Bacillus thuringiensis)
Multiple labels Apply to small early instar larvae for best control. Larval death not immediate, but feeding quickly inhibited. May use when bees pollinating.Do not apply when bees are actively foraging, toxic to bees. Best results occur when applications are made in the evening since sunlight kills the Beauveria spores over time. 

Do not apply when bees are actively foraging toxic to bees for 3 hours after application.

Micotrol-0
(Beauveria bassiana)
1 qt/acre
Entrust 2 oz/acre
Flea beetle
Strawberry rootworm
  Apply at 7-10 day intervals in evening. Flea beetle larvae only.  Best results occur when applications are made in the evening since sunlight kills the Beauveria spores over time.Do not apply when bees are actively foraging, toxic to bees. 

Do not apply when bees are actively foraging toxic to bees for 3 hours after application.

Micotrol-0
(Beauveria bassiana)
1 qt/acre
Entrust 2 oz/acre
Cultural Techniques to Reduce Disease Infestations
Monolinia Blight Fire pruning Blueberry litter must be ignited, if too wet then will have incomplete sanitation.
Botrytis Blight Mulch A 2-inch layer of mulch will prevent germination of mummies.

 Information in this publication is provided purely for educational purposes. No responsibility is assumed for any problems associated with the use of products or services mentioned. No endorsement of products or companies is intended, nor is criticism of unnamed products or companies implied.

© 1994, 2004

Published and distributed in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Acts of Congress of May 8 and June 30, 1914, by the University of Maine and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Cooperative Extension and other agencies of the USDA provide equal opportunities in programs and employment. Call 800.287.0274 or TDD 800.287.8957 (in Maine), or 207.581.3188, for information on publications and program offerings from University of Maine Cooperative Extension, or visit extension.umaine.edu.

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