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Aquaculture Research Institute


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$20million grant award to advance marine farming

$20million NSF RII Track 1 EPSCoR Award – Sustainable Ecological Aquaculture Network (SEANET) 

The Sustainable Ecological Aquaculture Research Network (SEANET) will be established under this award to gain a comprehensive understanding of how sustainable ecological aquaculture can interact with coastal communities and ecosystems. This multi-institutional, public-private partnership led by the University of Maine in collaboration with the University of New England and other institutions in Maine will use Maine’s 3,500 mile coastline as a living laboratory to study physical oceanography, biophysical, biogeochemical, socio-economic, and policy interactions that have local, bioregional, national, and global implications.

More details available at http://umaine.edu/news/blog/2014/08/05/advancing-marine-farming/

Maine’s Aquaculture Industry Bounces Back!

Latest economic figures demonstrate how much the industry has grown since the crash in 2000.

http://www.pressherald.com/2013/11/16/maine_s_aquaculture_industry_bouncing_back_/

Aquaculture generates $161 million annually in revenues in the Northeast

Take a look at this press release from NOAA  http://www.nero.noaa.gov/stories/2013/aquacultureNE.html

When most people think of fresh seafood from the Northeast, it’s likely that lobster, scallops and cod come to mind. However in this region, aquaculture actually plays a big role in bringing fresh seafood to American consumers’ tables. In fact, in the Northeast, aquaculture production ranks third behind sea scallops and American lobster in value, generating about $161 million annually in revenues.

10 Myths About Aquaculture

Click here for a must read article published by NOAA debunking some of the common myths about aquaculture in the USA.

And whilst we’ve got you thinking about it…take a look at this recent press release from NOAA “When most people think of fresh seafood from the Northeast, it’s likely that lobster, scallops and cod come to mind. However in this region, aquaculture actually plays a big role in bringing fresh seafood to American consumers’ tables. In fact, in the Northeast, aquaculture production ranks third behind sea scallops and American lobster in value, generating about $161 million annually in revenues.”   http://www.nero.noaa.gov/stories/2013/aquacultureNE.html

ARI Seminars on the Web

You can find the recording of Nick Brown’s 10 April 2014 seminar, “Incorporating the polychaete worm, Nereis virens into marine aquaculture systems” at the seminars website. Future ARI seminars will be available at the same link. Note: the videos may take a minute to load.

Image Description: 2014 ARI Seminar

Experimental Scallop Farming Project

Chris Vonderweit (Dept of Marine Resources) and Dana Morse (Maine Sea Grant)  visited Kevin Scott at the Salt Pond site, and Marsden in Stonington. With them were Bill Trotter and Gabor Degre of the Bangor Daily News; they took a bunch of photos/video and Bill put together a great articlae viewable at

http://bangordailynews.com/slideshow/cages-in-maine-pilot-program-could-be-first-step-toward-farmed-scallops/

The experimental scallop farming project continues to go well at both sites, and we’ll start to see effects of density experiments soon: there is a lot of growth sideways (Shell Width) and the shells are standing taller too (Shell Depth).  We have started to collect a little data on the Shell Height/Shell Width ratio to capture this, but there’s not much to report on there yet.

At one site the Aquatrays got hit with a pretty heavy barnacle set, including the scallops inside the cages, though the shellfish bags seemed to avoid this more or less…unclear as to why that was.  Mortality at both sites was near zero. And biotoxin sampling continues but again nothing to report yet.   For more information contact Dana Morse (dana.morse@maine.edu)

 

 

AQUACULTURE EPSCOR PROPOSAL MEETING

Marine aquaculture in the coastal zone has the potential to help solve several societal problems including contributions to the global food and energy systems. These systems are subject to complex and dynamic interactions among natural and human-driven processes.

A major challenge is to understand the dynamics of this coupled human-natural system in order to inform societal decisions about the intensification of marine aquaculture in the coastal zone. Such understanding requires integration of a broad range of disciplines from the natural, social, economic and behavioral sciences.

Faculty interested in joining us in the development of this proposal are invited to contact

Dr Ian Bricknell (ian.bricknell@umit.maine.edu; 207-581-4380) or

Dr Anne Langston (anne.langston@umit.maine.edu; 207-356-2982)

 

 

Food Sciences mentioned in the Portland Press Herald

Our lovely Brianna Hughes is in the news (again)! Well done Brianna!

http://www.pressherald.com/news/enrollments-growing_2012-09-26.html

Seaweed workshop a huge success!

Well done to our colleagues Dana Morse and Sarah Redmond on a superb seaweed workshop!

 

http://www.wabi.tv/news/32998/researchers-hold-workshop-in-belfast-on-growing-seaweed-industry

Prof Ian Bricknell talks about bait risks on MPBN radio

Hear our director, Prof Ian Bricknell, talk about bait risks on MPBN radio

http://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mpbn.net%2FHome%2Ftabid%2F36%2Fctl%2FViewItem%2Fmid%2F3478%2FItemId%2F23633%2FDefault.aspx&h=DAQF8oBtA&s=1


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Contact Information

Aquaculture Research Institute
5735 Hitchner Hall Room 179
Orono, Maine 04469
Phone: 207.581.4397E-mail: anne.langston@umit.maine.edu
The University of Maine
Orono, Maine 04469
207.581.1110
A Member of the University of Maine System