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Department of Anthropology


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Courses - ANT 400 Level Courses

* = Required Courses

ANT 414 – Ethics in Archaeology

This course explores the complex world of archaeological and anthropological ethics, primarily in North America. Through the assigned readings, writing assignments, and class discussions, we will examine the following themes: the relationship between archaeologists and the native people they study, the role of science in interpreting the past, and the ethics of archaeological study, collecting, and museum exhibition.

Satisfies the General Education Ethics Requirement

Prerequisite ANT 101

Credits: 3


ANT 420 – Human Impacts on Ancient Environments

Designed to challenge students to critically evaluate the relationship between humans and their environment, and to assess the local, regional, and global impact of humans on our planet. The long, diachronic approach taken here, particularly over the past 10,000 years, will serve to broaden our understanding of how humans have effected change in our landscapes and resource distribution in the past, and ultimately how this perspective may be integrated with contemporary resource management and environmental policy for the future. Historical ecology is also introduced as a research program structured to evaluate the historical role human agency has played in shaping contemporary landscapes.

Satisfies the General Education Population and the Environment Requirement.

Prerequisites & Notes ANT 101 or EES 100 or permission.

Credits: 3


ANT 421 – Inca Society and Peasants of the Andes

Explores the nature of Inca civilization of South America as it began to form in the 15th century. Also explores the organization of Andean peasant communities, which constituted the foundation of Inca society in the past and continues to dominate Andean landscapes today.

Satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive Requirement.

Prerequisites & Notes ANT 101 or ANT 207, or permission.

Credits: 3


ANT 422 – Folklore of Maine and The Maritime Provinces

A survey of the genres of folklore found in the major linguistic traditions (English, French, Native American) of the Northeast, with emphasis on Maine. Special attention given to the occupational traditions of farming, fishing and lumbering.

Prerequisites & Notes ANT 221 or permission of instructor.

Credits: 3


ANT 425 – Recorded Interviewing Techniques and Methods

This course will introduce students to the theory and methodology of ethnographic and oral history fieldwork as it is practiced by social scientists and humanities researchers. Students will learn to prepare research plans, develop questions, and conduct and record interviews. They will learn how to navigate the essential practices of permissions, understand the concepts of copyright of research materials as it pertains to interviews, and fulfill the requirements of the Institutional Review Board for the Protection of Human Subjects (IRB) – Required Training at the University of Maine. Students will learn about the practices of archiving research materials and how to interpret and incorporate interview research into a research paper or documentary.

Satisfies the General Education Ethics Requirement.

Prerequisites & Notes

Permission.

Credits: 3


ANT 426 – Native American Folklore

An overview of folklore and folklife covering various genres of traditional expressive culture.

Satisfies the General Education Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirement.

Credits: 3


ANT 430 – Who Owns Native Cultures?

The answer to the simple question of who owns Native American/American Indian/indigenous cultures and cultural productions is surprisingly complex and engages the history of anthropology and the nature of anthropological knowledge itself. This course will examine the evolving relationships between anthropologists, historians, and other researchers with indigenous peoples (in particular American Indians) and what kinds of ethical and legal relationships have evolved over time to address this question. It will also look at the ways in which contemporary cultural resource management by indigenous peoples serves as a key articulation of indigenous nationhood and sovereignty. Special attention will be given to recent scholarship by indigenous researchers that decolonizes standard academic practices and roots the ownership of Native cultures and research in Native communities.

Satisfies the General Education Social Contexts & Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

Prerequisites & Notes

ANT 102 or NAS 101 or permission

Credits: 3


ANT 431 – Folklore, the Environment and Public Policy

Examines the interaction of humans with the environment from the perspective of folklore, and reviews its impact on public policy at the local, state, federal and international levels.

Satisfies the General Education Population and the Environment Requirement.

Credits: 3


ANT 435 – Human Dimensions of Natural Resource Management

This course focuses on shifting paradigms guiding natural resource management. The class will survey a variety of influential ideas driving debates over natural resources, including the following:
1.) debates over property rights and management approaches in common pool resources.
2.) complex adaptive systems theory and its role in the debate over adaptive management and area-based management as alternatives to single-species management.
3.) the ideal of efficiency in the formative era of professional natural resource management and new approaches that seek to move beyond it
4.) ideas of progress, modernism, and optimism, including debates over the limits to growth
5.) debates over uncertainty and the precautionary principle. Students will explore these paradigms through case studies from fisheries, climate change, industrial pollution, forestry and public land management. In doing so, students will gain a better understanding of the development and contours of current debates over controversial environmental issues.

Satisfies the General Education Population & Environment

Prerequisites:

Junior or Senior Standing

Credits: 3


ANT 439 – Psychological Anthropology

An introduction to the concepts, theories and techniques involved in anthropological Investigations of the relationships of culture, society, and the individual.

Prerequisites & Notes

ANT 102 or ANT 300 or permission.

Credits: 3


ANT 441 – People and Cultures of the Pacific Islands

Topics include Pacific geography, the history and prehistory of the Pacific islands, cultural traditions of the ancient Polynesians with special reference to the political evolution of their societies, cultural traditions of the Melanesians with special reference to art, warfare and ritual, cultural traditions of the Micronesians with special reference to the problems of these Oceanic people in the modern world.

Satisfies the General Education Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

Prerequisites & Notes

ANT 102 or ANT 300 or permission.

Credits: 3


ANT 448 – Ethnography Through Film

A critical analysis of film from an anthropological perspective. Students will be introduced to the history of the use of ethnographic film in anthropology, and they will consider how professional anthropologists living at different times have used motion pictures to capture aspects of human cultural behavior. Students will also examine how ethnographic films, documentaries, and popular motion pictures (past and present) have been used to represent people in a variety of cultures. We will ask how professional anthropologists may differ from other types of filmmakers in their treatment of the same cultural groups and/or subjects.

Satisfies the General Education Ethics Requirement.

Prerequisites & Notes ANT 102 or permission.

Credits: 3


ANT 451 – Native American Cultures

Covers both traditional culture patterns and modern developments and problems. Includes consideration of traditional culture areas, emphasizing adaptations and cultural dynamics, past and present.

Satisfies the General Education Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirement.

Prerequisites & Notes ANT 102 or NAS 101 or permission.

Credits: 3


ANT 452- Civilization in South Asia

An exploration into the nature of civilization in South Asia, focusing on India. The central religious tradition of Hinduism and the caste order are investigated, with complementary perspectives provided by non-Hindu traditions. The impact of colonialism and development of national identities are also considered. Anthropological views are distinguished from and supplemented by other disciplinary perspectives.

Satisfies the General Education Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

Prerequisites & Notes ANT 102 or ANT 300 or permission of instructor.

Credits: 3


ANT 454 – Cultures and Societies of the Middle East

Each semester, a specific Middle Eastern conflict will be examined with particular attention to the different ways it is understood by the parties involved. The course will attempt to demonstrate the importance of understanding conflict from the insider’s point of view.

Satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive, Social Contexts and Institutions, and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

Prerequisites & Notes ANT 102 or ANT 300 or permission.

Credits: 3


ANT 458 – Anthropology of War

Surveys war in human prehistory and history and the anthropological theories developed to explain it. The primary focus is on pre-industrial warfare, especially the contact-era Pacific. Throughout the course, however, this comparative perspective will be brought to bear on what pre-modern warfare tells us about war in the modern world.

Satisfies the General Education Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

Prerequisites & Notes ANT 102 or permission.

Credits: 3


ANT 462 – Numerical Methods in Anthropology

Introduction to how numerical methods are used in anthropological research. Topics include: survey and history of numerical methods in anthropology, presentation and description of quantitative and qualitative anthropological data, probability, testing anthropological hypotheses using parametric and nonparametric statistics, the pitfalls and potential of numerical methods in anthropology.

Satisfies the General Education Mathematics Requirement.

Prerequisites & Notes one 300 level course in anthropology or permission. MAT 232 recommended but not required.

Credits: 3


ANT 464 – Ecological Anthropology

Comparative study of human populations in ecosystems. Topics include the adaptive nature of culture, implications of the ecological approach for anthropological theory, sociocultural evolution and change, and contemporary problems. Case studies from simple and complex societies.

Satisfies the General Education Social Contexts and Institutions and Population and the Environment and Writing Intensive Requirements.

Prerequisites & Notes ANT 102 or permission.

Credits: 3


ANT 465 – Political Anthropology

A study of mechanisms and institutions for mediating disputes and allocating public power in selected non-Western societies.

Satisfies the General Education Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

Prerequisites & Notes ANT 102 or ANT 300 or permission.

Credits: 3


ANT 466 – Economic Anthropology

Comparative study of production, consumption and exchange in selected non-Western societies. Emphasis on factors influencing economic decisions in a variety of social and cultural settings.

Satisfies the General Education Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

Prerequisites & Notes ANT 102 or ANT 300 or permission.

Credits: 3


ANT 467 – Peasant Studies

Peasants, neither primitive nor modern, are the majority of humanity. A comparative study of peasant societies in various parts of the world including a critical examination of the body of anthropological theory concerning peasantry.

Prerequisites & Notes ANT 102 or ANT 300 or permission.

Credits: 3


ANT 469 – Theories of Religion

Considers various anthropological approaches to religion including evolutionary, historical, psychological, functional, structural, and symbolic. Emphasis on the appropriateness of these theories for the wide range of cross-cultural material available.

Satisfies the General Education Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

Prerequisites & Notes ANT 102 or permission.

Credits: 3


ANT 470 – Religion and Politics

A study of religion and politics in a wide variety of human societies, past and present with particular emphasis on 1) the interrelationships among religion, culture, and political ideology as systems of belief and value, 2) the relationship between religious and national identity and 3) the role of interests and values in determining political action.

Satisfies the General Education Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Writing Intensive Requirements.

Prerequisites & Notes ANT 102 or ANT 120 or permission.

Credits: 3


ANT 475 – Environmental Archaeology

Introduces historical and current theoretical literature which addresses cultural environmental relationships in prehistoric contexts. Emphasis on outlining the kinds of environmental data that survive in the historical record (geological, floral, faunal, soils, etc.), the sampling methods used to collect different kinds of data and types of inferences that can be made from surviving data regarding fossil cultural environmental relationships.

Satisfies the General Education Population and the Environment Requirement.

Prerequisites & Notes ANT 317.

Credits: 3


ANT 476 – Ancient Maya

Examines the origins and development of ancient Maya civilization beginning with precursors to Maya culture in the first two millennia BC and ending with the final conquest of the last independent Maya kingdom in 1697. Among the topics covered will be the rise of complex society in the Maya region, the history of individual Maya city-states and rulers, social and political organization, art and religion, craft production and economy, commoner life, hieroglyphic writing, human-environment dynamics, and the Classic Maya collapse.

Satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive Requirement.

Prerequisites & Notes ANT 101 or ANT 170

Credits: 3


ANT 477 – Field Research in Archaeology

Introduction to archaeological field techniques through excavation of an archaeological site. Intensive training in site survey, excavations techniques, recording, analysis and preliminary interpretation of archaeological materials. Generally conducted on prehistoric and historic sites in Maine. Admission by application only.

Satisfies the General Education Applications of Scientific Knowledge and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements. (Offered summers only.)

Prerequisites & Notes permission.

Credits: 2-6


ANT 478 – Zooarchaeology

A laboratory course covering techniques for analysis and interpretation of osteological remains from archaeological sites.

Satisfies the General Education Lab in the Basic or Applied Sciences Requirement. Rec 2, Lab 2.

Prerequisites & Notes ANT 317 or permission.

Credits: 4


ANT 479 – Laboratory Techniques in Prehistoric Archaeology

Hands-on experience in lab techniques using real archaeological materials. Includes analysis, classification and synthesis of the data. Rec 1, Lab 2.

Satisfies the General Education Applications of Scientific Knowledge Requirement.

Credits: 3


ANT 481 – Language, Culture and Society

Introduction to basic concepts, problems and methods used by anthropologists in the investigation of the relationships among language, culture and society. Topics include the biological basis of language; origin and evolution of human language; language, conceptual systems and world view; language socialization in cross-cultural perspective; language in its social context (e.g. social roles, gender, settings, speech “styles,” attitudes, discourse, bilingualism).

Satisfies the General Education Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

Prerequisites & Notes ANT 102; INT 410 highly recommended.

Credits: 3


ANT 490 – Topics in Anthropology

Advanced treatment of specialized problems in anthropology with emphasis on analysis in frontier areas of anthropological research. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: 3


ANT 493* – Capstone in Anthropology: What does it mean to be human?

Capstone course for Anthropology and International Affairs in Anthropology majors. Addresses five themes concerning anthropology and what it means to be human. (1) Debate and Argumentation in Anthropology; (2) Science, Theory, and the Applications of Anthropological Inquiry; (3) Race and Human Variation; (4) Climate, Environment, and Culture; and (5) Religion and Warfare in Human Society. Emphasis on topics of relevance to contemporary society. Faculty from all anthropological sub-disciplines of Anthropology will contribute lectures.

Satisfies the General Education Capstone Experience Requirement.

Prerequisites & Notes Senior standing in the Anthropology or International Affairs in Anthropology majors..

Credits: 3


ANT 497 – Department Projects

A special project course. Specific content, scheduling and credit hours proposed by student in consultation with instructor. Maximum of 3 credit hours.

Form: Independent Study In Anthropology (PDF)

Credits: Arr

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Contact Information

Department of Anthropology
5773 S.Stevens Hall
Orono, Maine 04469-5773
Phone: (207) 581-1894 | Fax: (207) 581-1823E-mail: gail.agrell@umit.maine.edu
The University of Maine
Orono, Maine 04469
207.581.1110
A Member of the University of Maine System