Skip Navigation

Courses - ANT 200 Level Courses

ANT 207 – Introduction to World Archaeology

An overview of the human record as determined by archaeology using examples drawn from the global experience.

Satisfies the General Education Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirement.

Credits: 3


ANT 210 – Physical Anthropology

Introduces current topics in human biology and evolution including human origins and the fossil record, human genetics and population variability, and human and non-human primate behavior.

Satisfies the General Education Applications of Scientific Knowledge Requirement.

Credits: 3


ANT 212 – The Anthropology of Food

Food is the most direct and meaningful connection people have with the environment, a connection that addresses both biological and cultural needs. This course aims at exposing students to the different ways in which anthropologists think about food across its sub-disciplines as a way to understand human origins, behavior, and cultural diversity. Themes include food procurement strategies, influence on human evolution, religious traditions and food, food as pertains to power dynamics, warfare, gender relations and identity, and the role of food in environmental and sustainable development policy-making.

Satisfies the General Education Cultural Diversity & International Perspectives and Population & the Environment Requirements.

No prerequisites

Credits: 3


ANT 221 – Introduction to Folklore

A survey of the different genres of folklore, its forms, uses, functions and modes of transmission. Emphasis on belief, custom and legend.

Satisfies the General Education Western Cultural Tradition and the Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

Credits: 3


 ANT 225 РClimate Change, Societies, and Cultures

Surveys the human dimensions of climate change from a cultural perspective: the interactions among societies, cultures, and climate change. Reviews climate change futures and their human implications around the world; Drivers of climate change; and technological, social, and cultural mitigation and adaptation strategies.  Perspective throughout is universalistic (all human societies, past and present) and holistic (all realms of thought and behavior, though with particular emphasis on social, political, and cultural dimensions).

Prerequisites & Notes ANT 101 or ANT 102 or Permission.

Credits: 3


ANT 245 – Sex and Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective

An exploration into the commonality and diversity of sex and gender roles in cross-cultural perspective and an examination of cultural and bio-sociol explanations for why such diversity exists. Foci include contemporary approaches to sex and gender, changing views about men’s and women’s roles in human evolution, the conditions under which gender roles vary in contemporary societies and the issues surrounding gender equality, power and politics.

Satisfies the General Education Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives and Ethics Requirement.

Credits: 3


ANT 249 – Religion and Violence

Explores the anthropology of contemporary political violence. The ethnographic study of terrorism, guerilla warfare, state terror and human rights will be complemented by examination of the ethical and methodological concerns that arise in this special area of investigation.

Satisfies the General Education Ethics, Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

Prerequisites & Notes ANT 120.

Credits: 3


ANT 250 – Conservation Anthropology: The Socio-Cultural Dimension of Environmental Issues

Conservation is fundamentally a socio-cultural problem. Examines the different types of human/nature relationships that emerge across various cultural, environmental, socio-economic, and political contexts. Through a comparative approach this course is designed to illustrate how culture is an important variable when creating viable conservation strategies. Themes covered in class include protected areas, indigenous and traditional knowledge, resource management, market-based conservation, environmental economics, and political ecology. Case studies: United States, Africa, Australia, Latin America, and Papua New Guinea.

Satisfies the General Education Population and the Environment and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

Credits: 3


ANT 256 – Ethnic Conflict

An exploration of ethnic conflict and revival today including a survey of anthropological theories of ethnicity, focusing on ethnic revival in the modern world. European and other ethnic groups of the industrialized West provide the major cases to be considered.

Satisfies the General Education Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

Credits: 3


ANT 260 – Forensic Anthropology

Provides an introduction to the application of the theory and methods of physical anthropology to medicolegal investigations and problems. The field consists of four basic topics: 1) human skeletal anatomy, 2) developing a biological profile, 3) the science of decomposition, and 4) forensic anthropology in the court system.

Satisfies the General Education Applications of Scientific Knowledge Requirement.

Credits: 3


ANT 261 – Islamic Fundamentalism

A survey of the distinctive ideological and social features of Islamic fundamentalist movements.

Satisfies the General Education Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

Prerequisites: ANT 102 or ANT 120 or permission

Credits: 3


ANT 270 – Environmental Justice Movements in the United States

Examines how poor and racialized communities have responded to the incidence, causes, and effects of environmental racism and injustice. Special attention will be given to how the critiques offered by these communities challenge the knowledge and procedural forms of justice embedded in environmental policy and democracy in the United States. Case studies will be drawn from readings on African-Americans, European-Americans, Chicano and Latino Americans, and Native Americans.

Satisfies the General Education Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

Credits: 3


ANT 280 – Northwest Coast Prehistory

This course explores the prehistory of the Pacific Northwest and its place in North American prehistory. Important themes include the earliest settlement of the Pacific Northwest and its role in the peopling of the Americas, the development of unique complex hunter-gatherer groups in the Northwest, ethical issues in Northwest Coast research history, and current debates and research in Pacific Northwest archaeology.

Prerequisite: ANT 101

Credits: 3


ANT 290 – Special Topics in Anthropology

Intermediate treatment of specialized problems in anthropology with emphasis on analysis in frontier areas of anthropological research. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: 3


 


Back to Courses