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Department of Anthropology


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Courses - ANT 100 Level Courses

* = Required Courses

ANT 101* – Introduction to Anthropology: Human Origins and Prehistory

A survey course focusing on the evolution of humankind, the development of culture, and the beginnings of civilization. Required for Anthropology majors.

Satisfies the General Education Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

Credits: 3


ANT 102* – Introduction to Anthropology: Diversity of Cultures

A survey course focusing on the nature of culture, similarities and differences among the world’s cultures, relationships among cultures, and culture change. Required for Anthropology majors.

Satisfies the General Education Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

Credits: 3


ANT 120 – Religions of the World

A survey of the distinctive features of the major world religions and the most studied Native American, African and aboriginal Australian religions. Focuses on the fit between myth and ritual, the problems involved in trying to understand both “from the believer’s point of view,” and what generalizations can be made about religion in general.

Satisfies the General Education Social Contexts and Institutions and Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

Credits: 3


ANT 140 – Cities of the Ancient World

This course explores ancient urbanism in a global context. It includes theoretical approaches to the concept of ‘city’ and weekly explorations of urban landscapes among ancient civilizations of the world.

Satisfies the General Education Cultural Diversity and International Perspectives Requirements.

No prerequisites

Credits: 3


ANT 170 – Popular Archaeology

Many popular ideas about the past are at odds with what professional archaeologists think they know. Most of us find the past inherently interesting, without embellishment. But we are commonly confronted by intriguing beliefs in visits by ancient astronauts, the lost continent of Atlantis, etc. While some of these ideas may have merit, many do not. Develops methods for evaluating critically the archaeological record, sorting out science from pseudoscience and distinguishing that which is plausible from that which is unlikely.

Credits: 3

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Contact Information

Department of Anthropology
5773 S.Stevens Hall
Orono, Maine 04469-5773
Phone: (207) 581-1894 | Fax: (207) 581-1823E-mail: gail.agrell@umit.maine.edu
The University of Maine
Orono, Maine 04469
207.581.1110
A Member of the University of Maine System