UMaine Mentioned in Press Herald, BDN Articles on Tick Increase

August 20th, 2014 2:47 PM

The University of Maine was mentioned in articles by the Portland Press Herald and Bangor Daily News on climate change and the increase of ticks and Lyme disease. Both reports referenced a question on the November ballot that will ask voters to approve an $8 million bond that would support a laboratory administered by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension for monitoring Lyme disease and other health threats related to mosquitoes, bed bugs and ticks. Research from UMaine’s Climate Change Institute also was referenced in the BDN article. A clinical research associate at the Maine Medical Center Research Institute, which tracks tick populations in the state, said CCI research shows the state will grow significantly warmer by 2050.

4-H Camp to Offer Leadership Training for High School Students, Sun Journal Reports

August 7th, 2014 1:57 PM

The Sun Journal reported the University of Maine 4-H Camp and Learning Center at Bryant Pond is teaming up with Mahoosuc Pathways, an organization that promotes outdoor adventure and connects communities in the Mahoosuc Mountain range of western Maine and northeastern New Hampshire, to offer leadership training for 10 high school students. A Mahoosuc Pathways employee told the Sun Journal the two organizations are paying students to get leadership training by helping build trails on local public conservation lands in August. The project, called the Oxford County Conservation Corps, began two years ago, after Mahoosuc Pathways began looking for a way to get students involved in building and maintaining local trails.

 

Tri-Town Weekly Publishes Q&A with McCarty

July 31st, 2014 9:16 AM

Tri-Town Weekly interviewed Kate McCarty, a food preservation community education assistant with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, in advance of UMaine Extension’s sixth annual Backyard Locavore Day on Aug. 9. McCarty will be one of several experts on hand for guided tours of backyards in Freeport and Brunswick for the event. During McCarty’s tour in Freeport, she will demonstrate how to increase self-sufficiency to meet food needs through backyard gardening techniques and food preservation methods. “I love Maine and believe it produces incredible food. I take every opportunity to support our local food producers, and it’s easy to do so with so many talented chefs, farmers, bakers, cheese makers and brewers,” McCarty said.

 

UMaine Cooperative Extension Lab Bond Selected as Question 2, WABI Reports

July 24th, 2014 1:42 PM

WABI (Channel 5) reported the order of bond questions for the November ballot was determined by a drawing in Augusta. A bond referring to funds for an animal and plant disease and insect control lab administered by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension was selected as Question 2. The question reads, “Do you favor an $8,000,000 bond issue to support Maine agriculture, facilitate economic growth in natural resources-based industries and monitor human health threats related to ticks, mosquitoes and bedbugs through the creation of an animal and plant disease and insect control laboratory administered by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension Service?”

Press Herald Advances Food Preservation Workshops

July 15th, 2014 9:15 AM

 

The Portland Press Herald reported on July food preservation workshops hosted by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension. The workshops teach techniques for hot water bath and pressure canning, as well as fermentation and drying of herbs, fruits and vegetables. Workshops are scheduled in Lisbon Falls, South Paris and Falmouth. The cost is $15 per person for materials, and registration can be completed online.

SeacoastOnline Interviews Kaczor About Health of Maine’s Beaches

July 14th, 2014 12:49 PM

 

Keri Kaczor, of the University of Maine Cooperative Extension and coordinator of Maine Healthy Beaches, spoke with SeacoastOnline about the health of Maine’s beaches following the release of the Natural Resources Defense Council’s annual report on the water quality at beaches throughout the nation. Maine Healthy Beaches is a partnership between the UMaine Extension/Sea Grant, the Maine Department of Environmental Protection, and local municipalities. The statewide organization is dedicated to monitoring and keeping beaches clean. Kaczor said despite Maine’s low rank in the NRDC report, there are plenty of beaches in the state with nearly spotless records, and most of those beaches are in state or national parks where there is little to no developmen

Haskell Facilitates Facilitation

July 1st, 2014 11:32 AM

 

University of Maine Cooperative Extension Professor Jane Haskell specializes in strengthening skills of group facilitators so meetings can be conducted effectively and efficiently. Fishermen and graduate students are among her more than 400 clients.

This summer, Haskell, who has authored a national facilitation-training curriculum, is working with members of Wabanaki Nations.

She’s also researching how to buoy skills of facilitators who assist refugees. Specifically, she’s studying how American-born, English-speaking facilitators and group leaders ask for feedback from refugees who have recently arrived in the United States.

Refugees, she says, may not have positive experience with regard to giving comments in a formal group setting and may not understand the concept from a Western perspective or framework.

Haskell and a colleague who specializes in immigration and refugees issues are exploring how to best partner with refugees so that their perspectives are heard and understood in Maine.

Maine Sea Grant Updates Guide to Managing Hurricane Hazards

June 30th, 2014 9:26 AM

 

Hurricane hazards come in many forms, including storm surge, heavy rainfall, flooding, high winds and rip currents. All of these can affect people who live on shorefront land. To help property owners take steps now to make their homes more resilient and less damage-prone over the long run, Maine Sea Grant has updated the Maine Property Owner’s Guide to Managing Flooding, Erosion & Other Coastal Hazards.

The online resource contains detailed information on navigating state and federal regulatory and permitting processes associated with actions such as elevating a house, moving a house back away from the water, restoring dunes, creating buffers and stabilizing coastal bluffs. Normandeau Associates Environmental Consultants worked in partnership with Sea Grant and University of Maine Cooperative Extension to make this new information available. Now, not only can coastal property owners learn more about the hazards they face and what can be done to protect their property, they also can access step-by-step recommendations and permitting guidance.

Examples of property owners who have taken some of these steps are highlighted in case studies from across southern Maine. Information about a tour of resilient properties to be offered in September will be online.

Property owners in Maine’s coastal communities are encouraged to review this updated guidance document as soon as possible. By taking action now to prevent hurricane damage, public and private property owners can greatly reduce their risk of damage and avoid significant costs and delays associated with repairs and restoration.

UMaine Extension’s Integrated Pest Management Program Cited in Press Herald Article

June 25th, 2014 9:39 AM

 

The University of Maine Cooperative Extension’s integrated pest management (IPM) programs were mentioned in a Portland Press Herald article about local organic strawberries being limited in Maine. Cathy Karonis of Fairwinds Farm in Bowdoinham said she has contemplated going organic, but can’t risk crop failure or inconsistent quality on her 14 acres of strawberries. Karonis said she follows UMaine Extension’s IPM reports and sprays when necessary. IPM is a comprehensive, decision-making process for solving pest problems. It is a sustainable approach providing economical control with the least possible hazard, to people, property and the environment.

2013 Newly Certified Master Gardener Volunteers

June 16th, 2014 2:31 PM

Androscoggin-Sagadahoc Counties 2013 Master Gardener Volunteer graduates(LISBON FALLS) – Recently, ten dedicated volunteers were certified in the University of Maine Cooperative Extension Androscoggin-Sagadahoc Counties 2013 Master Gardener Volunteers Program. They include, from Androscoggin County, Mark Drummond, Paula Curtis-Everett, Nancy Morris, and Corbin Lichtinger, from Sagadahoc County Michelle Rines, and Ted Wolfe and from Cumberland County Teeter Bibber, Elly Dominguez, Ruth Klein and Peri Lanoue. Pictured from left to right; Ted Wolfe, Michelle Rines, Elly Dominguez, Peri Lanoue, Teeter Bibber and Mark Drummond.

The classroom portion of the 2014 program was held at the Good Shepherd Food Bank in Auburn and focused on vegetable and fruit production topics presented by Extension Educators, Extension Specialists, and the Maine Board of Pesticide Control Trainer, among others.

To complete their Master Gardener Volunteers Certification, 22 participants will complete 40 hours of volunteer time helping others learn about research-based, sustainable gardening.  A variety of volunteers projects are underway, including, growing vegetables and fruit for the Maine Harvest for Hunger Project, helping friends and neighbors with gardening questions, assisting in maintaining the gardens established at the Maine Maritime Museum, the Sagadahoc County Courthouse, the Auburn P.A.L. Center and the Patrick Dempsey Center for Cancer, Hope and Healing.

The 2015 training will be held at the Topsham Public Library on Thursday afternoons beginning in late February.

To learn more about the Master Gardener Volunteers program, contact Administrative Assistant KymNoelle Sposato at the Androscoggin-Sagadahoc Counties Cooperative Extension Office, 24 Main St., Lisbon Falls, ME 04252 phone 353.5557 or in Maine 1.866.500.9088 or email kymnoelle.sposato@maine.edu or visit the UMaine Cooperative Extension Master Gardener Volunteer page online.