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Advisor's Handbook


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A B C D E F G H I J L M N O P R S T U V W


DEAN OF STUDENTS

The Dean of Students is an advocate for students. The Dean helps students navigate administrative red tape, offers counsel and advice, and works with them to evaluate and develop better possibilities for their life on campus. The Dean also oversees the programs and services sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs. Please call (207) 581-1406 for additional information.

DEAN’S LIST

The Dean’s List for each college recognizes students who have achieved at a high level during the previous semester. Criteria for inclusion on the Dean’s list are: 1) having completed 12 or more hours in a semester exclusive of pass-fail courses and without any incompletes, and 2) achieving a semester grade point average of at least 3.3.

DEGREE AUDIT

A degree audit is a computerized analysis of a student’s progress towards a degree in a specific major. Function of MaineStreet not yet available at the time of this Handbook release, but is programmed to come on- line in the future.

DEGREE HOURS

Degree hours are defined as the sum of the course credit hours of courses which may be counted toward a degree, provided a passing grade has been received.

DEPRESSION

Students who appear to be suffering from depression should be referred to the Counseling Center. Explain that interactions between the student and the Counseling Center are strictly confidential. You may want to ask the student if you can call and make an appointment for them before they leave your office. In any case, be sure they know where the Counseling Center is located (in the Cutler Health Center) and its phone numbers (581.1392) for regular appointments; 581-4040 for night and weekend emergencies.

DINING

Auxiliary Services and Black Bear Dining are pleased to offer our students and campus community various options of meal plans designed to provide value, flexibility and convenient spending; along with a variety of professional restaurant facilities, right here on campus!  We offer resident students three meal plan options and commuter students six meal plan options. Each meal plan consists of two components

For those members of the campus community who do not wish to buy a meal plan, Dining Funds and Black Bear Bucks are available for purchase. In addition, Dining Funds and Black Bear Bucks holders receive a 5% discount and are tax exempt!

We are here for you. Please visit our website at http://www.maine.edu/dining for the most up-to-date information regarding Black Bear Dining.

DISABILITIES

The University of Maine complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. These laws require the institution to provide academic adjustments as a means of accommodating students with disabilities. Students requesting accommodation must provide current comprehensive evidence of a documented disability from a health care or psycho-educational professional, as well as a copy of their academic records from institutions they attended prior to enrolling at the University of Maine. The Coordinator of Services for Students with Disabilities will organize and oversee all procedures relating to this policy. For further information, please contact Disability Services for guidelines (207) 581-2319, TTY (207) 581-2311.

DISMISSAL

Dismissal is normally the final action taken when students are not making satisfactory progress toward a degree or when students readmitted after suspension show no improvement in their accumulative average or otherwise fail to meet conditions set by the college.

DIVISION OF LIFELONG LEARNING – See http://dll.umaine.edu/

DOUBLE DEGREES

Students may earn a second baccalaureate degree by completing additional credits beyond the number required for the primary degree, and by completing all requirements of the second major and, if the second major is in a different college from the first, by completing all requirements of the second college. Students intending to complete more than one degree are required to declare their intent to the dean of their college (or to the deans of both colleges, if the degree programs are in different colleges) in writing no later than the first semester of the senior year. At that time the student must declare a primary major. If the degrees are completed simultaneously, the diploma will read, for example: “Bachelor of Science in Biology and Bachelor of Arts in Studio Art.” . Students may also complete a second degree subsequent to-graduation. Students selecting this option must apply for readmission, complete additional credits beyond the minimum required for the first degree, and complete all college and major requirements for the second degree. If readmitted within two years of graduation, students may apply any credits previously earned in excess of the minimum required for the first degree. Students readmitted for a second degree more than two years after the first graduation must complete additional credits, regardless of the number of credits earned previously. Federal regulations limit student financial aid for students who have earned their first bachelor degree. Students readmitted after graduation will not begin a new grade point average: the original GPA achieved at graduation will remain as a note on the student’s transcript at graduation and will not be adjusted subsequently. Students completing a second degree via this mechanism will receive a second diploma, and the second degree will also be noted on the transcript.

DOUBLE MAJORS

Double majors are possible within a single baccalaureate degree. Both majors may be within the same college, or they may be in different colleges. Students may complete two different majors simultaneously with no prescribed increase in total credits beyond those required to satisfy both majors. Students intending to complete the requirements of more than one major are required to declare their intent in writing to the dean of their college (or to the deans of both colleges, if the majors are in different colleges) no later than the first semester of the senior year. At this time the student must declare a primary major. The baccalaureate degree granted will be that associated with the primary major, and the student is required to satisfy all of the requirements imposed by that college. To complete the second major, the student need only complete the specific requirements established for that major. The primary and secondary majors will be noted both on the diploma and on the transcript, worded according to the following example: Bachelor of Science in Biology, with a second major in Art; or Bachelor of Art in Studio Art, with a second major in Biology (depending upon which is designated the primary major). Students may also complete a second major subsequent to graduation. Students selecting this option must apply for readmission, and are required only to satisfy the specific requirements for the chosen second major that are in force at the time of readmission. Federal regulations limit student financial aid for students who have earned their first bachelor degree. Students readmitted after graduation will not begin a new grade point average: the original GPA achieved at graduation will remain as a note on the student’s transcript at graduation and will not be adjusted subsequently. Students completing a second major via this mechanism will not receive a second diploma, but the phrase “with a second major in X” will be added to the transcript to recognize the accomplishment.

DROPPING COURSES

The consequences of dropping courses depend upon the time during the semester when the drop occurs. Students who frequently drop courses after the add/drop period may not meet the Satisfactory Academic Policy for financial aid recipients (see Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy for Financial Aid Recipients). Student financial aid eligibility will be recalculated based on the credit load at the end of the add/drop period. Aid already awarded prior to this date may be rescinded. (See the refund policy for students withdrawing from the University) During the first third of the semester, a student may drop courses without academic penalty. All such dropped courses are deleted from the student’s academic record. Student financial aid awarded after courses are dropped will be based on the reduced credit load. During the second third of the semester, a student may withdraw from a course if the student’s advisor and dean approve. Courses dropped will show on the student’s academic record, with a grade of “W.” The grade will not be computed into the semester average. During the final third of the semester, any courses dropped will normally carry a grade of “F” unless extenuating circumstances prevail. This’ grade will show on the student’s academic record and will be computed into the semester average. computed into the semester average.

Prior to dropping a course…

Discuss course progress with the professor. Are there ways to improve your course grade and is it possible to do so within the remaining time frame of the semester? If course grade is due to poor exam results, ask for a post exam review to find out:

Meet with your advisor and ask:

Is this course offered during May Term or Summer Session? (http://dll.umaine.edu/summer) If so, is it better to take it so it is the only course being taken? Is it financially feasible to be on campus during one of these times? Is this course required for the major? If required, is it central to the whole major of study? If so, is there a minimum grade required to progress to the next sequence?

Consider number of credit hours.

Students taking more than 15 credit hours may become stressed with the rigors of each course. If dropping a course frees up needed time to study for other classes, make sure the extra time is truly used for other classes. Will dropping this class affect the projected graduation date? (Most programs require at least 120 credits to graduate. Check with your department for requirements.) Some courses are not offered every semester; is this class? Will it affect other required courses in the future?

Dropping a course can affect financial aid.

Students need to maintain 6 or more credit hours to keep their student loans deferred. Dropping a course could affect a student’s current financial aid and academic status. Because each situation varies, students who receive financial aid should contact the Student Financial Aid Office located in Wingate Hall or call: 581-1324. (http://www.umaine.edu/stuaid). If you have a scholarship, check with the provider about any special stipulations.

Residence on campus may be affected by dropping a course.

Students are advised to talk with a representative of Residential Life or contact the Director of Housing at 581-4580 (http://umaine.edu/housing/) to determine their status if they drop a course.

Consider your work schedule:

Are you devoting more hours to work instead of academics? Should you reduce the number of hours you work per week instead of dropping a class? Are you working on-campus or off-campus? Depending on travel time, hours worked and type of work, evaluate your work situation and how it effects study time for all classes.

Are you an International Student?

International Students need to check with the Office of International Programs (http://www.umaine.edu/international). Contact the Office of International Programs located in Winslow Hall to learn about immigration laws. Individual countries set these laws and you should be familiar with them before dropping a course.

To officially drop a course: Contact the associate dean or director of your department or college [CLAS college office is in 130 Stevens Hall] to get an official course withdrawal form and the required signatures. Check with your academic departments for their procedure. Visit the Office of Student Records in Wingate Hall or call 581-1349. Know the university deadlines to avoid academic penalty.

First ten days of the semester: Students may change the grading option for courses between the Grade option and the Pass/Fail option. After 10 days, students may no longer change their grade option to pass/fail. First two weeks of the semester: Students may drop with a refund only during this period.

First third of the semester: Students may drop courses without academic penalty. All dropped courses are deleted from the student’s academic record.

Second third of the semester: A student may withdraw from a course if the student’s advisor and Dean approve. Courses dropped will show on the student’s academic record with a grade of “W”. The grade will not be computed into the semester average as a failing grade.

Final third of the semester: Any courses dropped will normally carry a grade of “WF”, unless extenuating circumstances prevail [such things as documented illness or family emergencies]. This grade will show on the student’s academic record and will be computed into the semester average as a failing grade. In the case of extenuating circumstances, students should consult with their college dean’s office.

Bottom line: It is costly to pay for courses and drop them on a continual basis, but sometimes students do need to drop a course to reduce stress. Please see your academic advisor if you have further questions. We hope this helps in making informed decisions about your education.

DRUGS (Student Wellness Resource Center) - See http://umaine.edu/aod/


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The University of Maine
Orono, Maine 04469
207.581.1865