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Table of Contents - 4-H Member Guidelines C.2.

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C.2.1  Guidelines for 4-H Animal Shows at Agricultural Fairs

Maine 4‑H members who wish to show animals at Maine Agricultural Shows must abide by the current Regulations for 4-H Shows at Maine Agricultural Fairs. These regulations include, among other things, allowing leased animals in 4‑H Shows and requiring exhibitors to present the standard Approval Form for 4‑H Animal Shows.

The Approval Form for 4-H Animal Shows certifies that the youth is an enrolled 4-H member in good standing and that the animals listed on the form are the ones being used in the project on the date the form was signed by the appropriate Extension staff member.  The 4‑H leader must sign the form on the line immediately below the last animal listed.  The 4‑H educator or professional in the county where the member is enrolled in that particular animal project must sign the form on the signature line at the bottom.  An embossed photocopy of the Approval Form for 4-H Animal Shows is then given to the 4‑H member and the original is kept on file in the 4‑H office in the county where the member is enrolled in that project.

Ownership/Lease Dates (Being Developed)

Agricultural Fair 4‑H Shows support the 4‑H programs being conducted in that fair’s county.  4-H shows are developed by the county 4‑H educator or professional who works with the Fair’s board.  The county 4-H educator or professional and the members of the board who devise the show are responsible for the creation and enforcement of any rules not covered by the State 4‑H Show Guidelines.  However, these rules must be published in a timely manner and available to all interested parties.

Individuals who work with 4-H shows (Superintendents, Judges, Gatekeepers, and so on) are encouraged to be positive and well mannered in their interaction with 4‑H youth.  Critiques and directions should be phrased in a positive manner that helps build the young person’s self‑esteem.

Contests and awards are to be developmentally appropriate.

4-H members must fit any animals they show.

Safety rules and regulations are strictly enforced.

C.2.2  Guidelines for 4-H Exhibit Halls at Agricultural Fairs

Each county Extension 4-H educator or professional works with local volunteers and fair committees as appropriate to develop 4-H rules and regulations governing 4-H exhibit halls at fairs.   4-H staff are encouraged to adopt these guidelines to create consistency among fairs.

GENERAL GUIDELINES

  1. All currently enrolled 4-H members in good standing from __(name of )__ county and the towns of __(town names)__ are encouraged to enter.  All exhibits by club members must be approved by and entered through their club leader.  For Club Leaders to enter your 4-H Club, and Independent Advisors to enter your Independent Members, please call __(person)__ at __(phone #)__ by __(date)__, 2012.   Space will be reserved on a first come, first served basis.  Independent members either leave their exhibits in the Exhibit Hall by __(time & date)_   to be set up by 4-H Staff, or bring them to the Extension Office by  _(date)_ .  No entry fee will be charged.
  2. Entrants can exhibit only items that they have produced or prepared in a project in which they are active during the current 4-H year.  Members may exhibit only one entry in any one project area, except for Creativity Unlimited, where projects not covered elsewhere in these rules may be exhibited.  And projects on distinct animal species, musical instruments, physical fitness and sports, and mechanical sciences may be considered separate projects as noted in the Exhibit Requirements, below.   Members may enter an exhibit for each separate project of these types.
  3. Exhibits must follow the Exhibit Requirements. Those that do not will receive no premium. The decisions of the judges are final. The Fair will afford the best protection possible for exhibits, but Extension and the Fair distinctly disclaim any liability for losses or damage to exhibits.
  4. Each entry must have a standard 4-H Exhibit & Judging Card and a Life Skills Card securely attached to it.  Both cards are available from the Extension Office.  Both sections of the Exhibit & Judging Card must be filled out completely by the 4-H’er, unless he/she is unable to do so. (A six year old who can’t write small enough may have help from a leader or parent.)  Include the unit level if the project has one, but otherwise write the number of years the member has been in the project in the Unit Level space.  Include your age as of January 1st, 2012, in the Age space of the card.  Failure to fill the card out completely will result in a one-ribbon mark-down.  Any special considerations that should be taken into account by the judges should be written on a Post-It note attached to the 4-H Exhibit & Judging Card by the leader.
  5. NO KITS are accepted, except in “Commercial Crafts”, “Models”, “Rocketry” and “Stitchery” projects.  By a “KIT” we mean articles made of pre-cut or pre-formed pieces that are only assembled by the 4-H’er.
  6. No posters, written reports, or scrap books allowed, except as specifically noted below in a project category.  Where posters are allowed, THEIR SIZE MUST BE 14″ x 22″, unless otherwise noted, with lettering that is legible from at least four feet away.
  7. All 4-H exhibits must be in place in the Exhibition Hall by  _(time and date)_ , or they will not be judged.  The Exhibit Hall will be open _ (times and dates)   , for exhibits to be set up.
  8. The judging will be done on the “Danish System” and will take place at _ (time and date)_ .  Each worthy exhibit will be awarded a ribbon and premium on the basis of how well it displays appropriate skills for the member’s age and number of years in the project.
  9. For all exhibits of photos, EXCEPT for a Photography Project, mount them neatly on one piece of poster board not larger than 14” x  22”.
  10. Premiums are as follows:
    Blue – $______               Red – $______          White – $______
  11. 4-H Club Leaders are responsible for their members following these rules and requirements, and Leaders must remove all exhibits from the Exhibit Hall _ (time and date)_ .
  12. The last category in the Exhibit Requirements, “Creativity Unlimited”, is for bona fide projects that are not covered elsewhere in the Requirements.

4-H CLUB EXHIBIT GUIDELINES

All clubs will display their projects as a club unit in a space assigned to the club. To be assigned space, please call  __(person’s name)__ at _ (phone #s)_   by  _(time and date)_ . If a club reserves space but does not show up, it will be unable to show at the fair next year unless the leader has called  _(person’s name)_ by  _(date)_ to let us know the club isn’t coming. Clubs are urged to use their members’ projects as their major display items.  Other decorations may be used sparingly to enhance the overall appearance of the club display (crepe paper, streamers, dried flowers, etc.)  Independent Members’ exhibits will be set up by 4-H Staff.

The club must prominently include its name and city or town for the public to see, and must have a  standard “4-H Exhibit & Judging Card” completed and tacked to the FRONT OF THE TOP SHELF.  The card must show the club name and the leader’s name and town. The club exhibits will be judged as follows:

  • 40 Points – for overall appearance of the club members’ individual projects in the space provided
  • 25 Points – for overall appearance of the decorated space
  • 25 Points – for the name and address of the club (appearance and execution)
  • 10 Points – for completed and properly placed exhibit card

Rosettes will be awarded to the First and Second  place clubs.  Premiums are:
First place club:  $______    Second place club:  $______    All other clubs:  $ ______

PROJECT EXHIBITS

We offer the following descriptions as examples of what members may enter for their Hall Exhibits in projects they are doing this year.  Members may enter an exhibit that meets these descriptions or, WITH EXTENSION EDUCATOR APPROVAL, enter an exhibit of their own creation that illustrates what they have learned or have done in the project.  The exhibit must be appropriate for the age of the member and years of experience in the project.  Please review the General Requirements, above, and the exhibit descriptions, below, and make your exhibit about the same size as those described here.  There is not room for larger exhibits at the Fair.

Animal Projects
Any item the member has made for the project during this 4-H year; OR four regular size photos that tell a story, mounted as a unit and individually labeled, (see Rule #9, above), OR a notebook the member has kept on their animal,  OR a poster depicting some aspect of animal care.  Separate entries may be submitted for each species of animal as long as each is conducted as a separate project. Poultry members may submit one-half dozen eggs instead of photos or an “item the member has made”, and must write on the Exhibit Card the average number of eggs produced per week.  Exhibits may be entered for animals that are shown at the fair.  No live animals may be displayed.  This category includes ALL animals not specifically mentioned elsewhere in these rules.

Art
Drawings or paintings made by the member ready for hanging with screw eyes or wire or other appropriate attachment, displaying appropriate skills for level and medium used, OR exhibit such art in a sketchbook open to the page being exhibited.  No paint by number kits or tracings.  Other art items such as tube painting, scrimshaw, marbling or sculpture may be included in this category.

Beekeeping
One pint of honey from member’s beehive; OR a poster about beekeeping, social structure of bees, the beehive, or how to extract honey, etc. NO LIVE BEES!

Bicycle
An exhibit showing safe bicycle use; OR a poster with a schedule and map of a bike trip taken this year; OR other exhibit as suggested in the project manual; OR 4 photos that tell a story with individual labels.

Camping
A camping item made in the project; OR a survival kit made in the project; OR a poster with ten knots you’ve learned in the project; OR a sturdy 8″ x 12″ handmade model of an Appalachian Shelter; OR a display illustrating “no-trace” camping techniques; OR a poster with a written schedule and map of a camping/hiking trip taken this 4-H year.

Candle Making
Any article made in the project showing appropriate skills for the member’s age and number of years in the project.

Ceramics & Pottery
Any article made in the project showing appropriate skills for the member’s age and number of years in the project.

Childcare
A safe and sanitary toy, game, or child’s item made by the member (list the age of child for whom it was made on the Exhibit Card); OR a poster or scrapbook showing appropriate childcare concerns.

Citizenship or Community Service
Display or 14″x 22″ poster illustrating: one of the individual member’s community service projects; OR the importance of voting, etc.  OR enter a collection of historic or related items, occupying no more than two square feet; OR 4 photos that tell a story with individual labels.

Commercial Crafts
For 5 – 8 year old members only.
  This category is for non-original arts and crafts, such as Artex kits, paint-by-number, craft kits, etc.  A KIT EXHIBIT MUST BE MARKED AS A KIT.  Paintings must be framed properly.  NO COLORING BOOKS.

Computers
A printout of a program written by the member; OR a display on the different parts or functions of a computer, OR how a computer works, OR the things computers do, etc.

Crafts  (No more than one “Craft” exhibit may be shown by each member.)   NO KITS.
Any original article made by the member and approved by the leader that does not fit in another exhibit category in these rules.  (See Art, Ceramics, Candle Making, Commercial Crafts, Macramé, Metal Crafts, etc.)

Crocheting
An article made by the member, such as headband, mittens, stretch slippers, sweater, afghan, pillow, etc.

Earth Connections / Natural Resources
Any article or poster that illustrates to the public what has been done in this project for the year.  May include scrapbooks or articles in which member has made items from natural resources such as:  gourd birdhouses, walking sticks, shadow boxes of shore items, etc., OR poster display or scale model on the ecology of a plant or animal species or on a habitat or community studied this year.

Electricity
Any article made in the project showing appropriate skills for the member’s age and number of years in the project.

Entomology
A poster display of what has been done in the project during the past year.  Include an explanation of the project.  Examples: planting a butterfly garden and displaying photos of butterflies visiting the garden; a non-toxic way to eliminate pests; pictures of insects in their natural habitat; OR 4 photos that tell a story with individual labels.  No scrapbooks or kits, and NO LIVE BUGS!

OR

Exhibit insect specimens neatly mounted in a case protected by a see-through cover, and labeled with their name on official 4-H entomology labels.  4-H members who cannot write small enough to fit the name on the label may have help.

  • Beginner — a minimum of 15 different mounted species of insects with common names
  • Intermediate – a minimum of 25 different mounted species in at least 5 orders, with common names
  • Advanced — a minimum of 35 different mounted species in at least 6 orders with scientific names
  • Master — a minimum of 45 different mounted species in at least 7 orders with scientific names

Field Crops & Fruits
From a minimum 1/4 acre planted to the same crop
.  One of: 6 bean pods or 1 pint dry beans;  OR 3 potatoes; OR 3 ears of corn; OR 3 of any produce you raised to sell; OR 1 pint of berries; OR a berry plant in a waterproof container.

Fishing
An article made by member such as:  collection of 6 flies including 1 dry, 1 nymph, 1 streamer and 3 other flies mounted on a wooden board or poster board; fish print tee shirt; streamer wallet or tying tool blocks; hat band, fly rods, or other fishing related item appropriate to age and number of years in the project;  OR Four regular-size photos that tell a story with individual labels.

Food Preparation
A recipe collection of at least 10 recipes in a current 4-H project and displayed in a box or notebook.  Each recipe should include its source and member’s comments or recommendations.  Recipes may be all one category (snacks, foreign foods, fat free, etc.) or may be varied.  Only one recipe collection per member; OR food articles made in the project showing appropriate skills for the member’s age and number of years in the project.  It should be something that will stay somewhat attractive for the week of the fair.  All such food exhibits must fit on a standard paper plate, be securely wrapped or sealed, and will be judged on taste, texture, and appearance.  Include the recipe of whatever you made on a 3″ x 5″ card.

Food Preservation  (Complete and attach a “Food Preservation Label” to each container.)

  • Beginner — 2 jars of different produce – choice of fruits, berries, tomatoes, jam
  • Intermediate — 3 jars of different produce – choice of fruits, vegetables, jam, jelly, berries, marmalade, pickles, or relish.
  • Advanced — 4 jars of different produce – choice of fruits, vegetables, jam, jelly, berries, conserves, pickles, relish

Forest Conservation
Six mounted photos that illustrate poor forest conservation practices, labeled to tell what the poor practice is and what might be done to “correct” the problem; OR six mounted “before and after” photos that illustrate the member’s own erosion prevention project, such as building diversion ditches or water bars, plantings of seedlings or ground cover, etc.

Forestry
Specimens must be labeled with common and scientific names.

  • Beginner — Collection of leaves, or needles and twigs with winter buds, of a least 10 tree species commercially important to Maine.
  • Intermediate — Collection of seeds of 10 tree species commercially important to Maine.
  • Advanced — Collection of at least 4 disease, insect, or animal damaged specimens, OR a display of some phase of industrial forestry, such as Christmas tree production or commercial logging, etc.

Gardening – Indoor
Specimens must be labeled with common and scientific names.

  • Beginner — One house plant grown by 4-H member.
  • Intermediate — A dish garden or terrarium.
  • Advanced — A dried flower arrangement; OR a winter centerpiece or bouquet using dried flowers, grasses or grains.  Driftwood, stones, evergreens, figurines may be used.  No fresh flowers.

Garden Crops (Not a Field Crop project as described above.)   Exhibit must be labeled with variety names.
A member may enter ONE Garden Crop exhibit, using any combination of the Home Garden produce for which HE/SHE WAS RESPONSIBLE for preparing the soil, planting, tending, and harvesting, as long as the produce exhibited will fit on a standard paper plate.  Tops should be removed within one inch of the top of root vegetables.  Brush vegetables but do not wash.  Select for uniform size, shape and color. Tomatoes may be green.

Garden Flowers
Flower arrangement, corsage, or winter bouquet.

Geology or Rocks & Minerals
Exhibit must be neatly mounted, labeled, and protected with a see-through cover.  All of the rocks or minerals must have been collected by the 4-H member during this 4-H year.

  • Beginner — A minimum of 10 different rocks or minerals
  • Intermediate — A minimum of 15 different rocks or minerals
  • Advanced — A minimum of 20 different rocks or minerals

Health & First Aid
Any poster or item display that could be used to inform the public about health issues, such as nutrition, the benefits of exercise, first aid, emotional health, sports health, etc.; OR an item, such as a first aid kit,  made by the member with an explanation of its usefulness.

Hobbies & Collections
A representative sample of the hobby or collection AND a mounted photo of the entire hobby or collection.

Home Improvement
Four to six photos that show the project from beginning to end, (suggested topics: decorating or renovating a room; a building project; landscaping a yard; etc.), OR an item made to improve the home with four to six photos of other items made in the project.

Jewelry
Handmade jewelry, submitted in a Ziploc bag, including but not limited to:  metal, polished stones, cloth, paper, ceramic, etc.  Includes necklaces, pins, bracelets, earrings, hair clips, rings.

Knitting (See the Knitted Projects Guidelines Sheet on the last page, for a list of techniques.)

  • Beginner – any article showing either garter stitch (all knit), or stockinet stitch (knit & purl).
  • Intermediate – any article showing the beginner level of stitches plus three other techniques.
  • Advanced — any article showing the beginner level plus four or more other techniques.

Leather Craft
Article made in the project showing appropriate skills for the member’s age and number of years in the project.

Macrame
Article made in the project showing appropriate skills for the member’s age and number of years in the project.

Maple Syrup  (Complete and attach a “Food Preservation Label” to the jar.)
One pint canning jar of syrup, sealed, with the threaded ring removed.

Mechanical & Automotive Sciences
Exhibit a poster or item showing: engine design and operation; OR care and maintenance of the machine; OR safety considerations; OR ignition or fuel system; OR similar exhibit.  Separate entries may be submitted for each type of machinery as long as each is conducted as a separate project.

Metal Craft
Article made in the project showing appropriate skills for the member’s age and number of years in the project.

Models
Article made by the member, showing appropriate skills for the member’s age and number of years in the project.  (KITS ALLOWED.)

Music & Musical Instruments
A display  that illustrates to the public what has been done in the project during the current 4-H year. Include a written explanation of the exhibit on a 3″x5″ card.  Separate entries may be submitted for each musical instrument,  as long as each is conducted as a separate project.

Photography
A photo story displayed in a notebook.  A photo story is a story told with pictures such as: how to make a garden, how to raise an animal for the fair, or the story of your vacation.  Captions should be placed under each photo — neatness counts.

  • Beginner — One photo story of five pictures using as many of the following as possible:  people pictures, animal pictures, flash pictures, 4-H project pictures.
  • Intermediate — One photo story of ten pictures using as many of the following as possible:  indoor pictures with flash, action pictures, fill-in flash pictures, close-up of person or pet made with a camera to subject at distance of 4.5 feet, low camera angle, level camera angle, high camera angle pictures.
  • Advanced — One photo story of fifteen pictures using as many of the following as possible:  flash pictures, existing light pictures, close-up pictures, pictures with great depth of field, pictures with shallow depth of field, pictures illustrating a creative interpretation of a common-place subject.
  • Master — One 8″ x 10″ enlargement made by member that tells a story, matted and framed. This will be hung, so attach a device for this purpose to the back of the picture.

Physical Fitness & Sports
A display that illustrates to the public what has been done in the project during this 4-H year, such as 4 photos that tell a story with individual labels.  All project activities must be about the member’s participation in the fitness activity or sport.  Being a spectator does not count.  Separate entries may be submitted for each sport, as long as each is conducted as a separate project.

Public Speaking
A display that illustrates to the public what the member has actively done in the project during this 4-H year, such as 4 photos that tell a story with individual labels.

Quilting
Article made in the project, showing appropriate skills for the member’s age and number of years in the project.

Reading

  • K to 3 – Exhibit an 8 1/2″ x 11″ original book cover illustrating some aspect of a book read by the member, using original ideas from the reading.  Include a 3″x 5″ card listing the names of other books read in the project.
  • All Other 4-H’ers — An original book cover as described for K-3, AND a 3″x 5″ card file with a separate card for each book the member has read this 4-H year that lists the following information: title, author, publisher, publication date, number of pages, and a brief synopsis of the book.

Recreation
Game or puzzle made in the project, showing appropriate skills for the member’s age and number of years in the project. List the age of child for which the toy or game was made.

Recycling
Any usable or creative product made from recycled materials.  Must show appropriate skills for member’s age and number of years in the project.

Rocketry
A model rocket may be used for display. 
Any creative way of presenting to the public such things as: rocket design, operation, safety considerations, ignition or fuel systems; OR similar exhibit.

Safety
Any item or poster made by the member that could be used to inform the public about safety considerations or potential hazards in some area of public concern.  If you exhibit an item, include an explanation on a 3”x 5” card.

Sewing
Any one item made by the member and approved by the leader.  Attach a 3″x5″ index card on which is written the sewing skill(s) the item illustrates and a list of other items made in the project. (A hanger must be provided for hang-able items.)  (The “skill requirements” are listed on our “4-H Clothing Project Advisors Reference Sheet,” after this project list.)

  • Beginner — 4 Beginner skill requirements
  • Intermediate — 3 Intermediate skill requirements in addition to 4 beginner skill requirements
  • Advanced — 3 Advanced skill requirements including at least 1 from categories 1, 3, & 5.

Snowmobile
Six photos of your snowmobile activities, (see General Requirements #9); OR a poster illustrating your project; OR other relevant display.

Soil & Water Conservation
Six mounted photos that illustrate poor conservation practices, labeled to tell what the poor practice is and what might be done to “correct” the problem; OR six mounted “before and after” photos that illustrate the member’s own conservation project; OR an educational poster about your project.

Stenciling
Any article made in the project, showing appropriate skills for the member’s age and number of years in the project.

Stitchery
ONE
article of the following, made in the project this 4-H year:  needlepoint, bargello, rug hooking, candle-wicking, crewel, cross-stitch, etc.  (Kits accepted.)

Veterinary Science
One display or poster on: the parts of an animal; normal vital signs; diseases; poisonous plants; heredity; nutrition; or allergies.

Wildflowers
A display of 10 different specimens, mounted on 14”x 22” poster board or in a field notebook, labeled with common and scientific names, and covered with a see-through cover for protection. Up to four specimens may be the member’s photographs or drawings of flowers on the endangered list.

Wildlife
A poster or display with 6 labeled sketches or 6 mounted photos of the wildlife you studied; track casts you made; a birdhouse, feeder, or other item you made during the project; or a display of other items collected.

Woodworking
Any article made by the member during this 4-H year showing appropriate woodworking skills (such as joining, cutting, fitting, finishing, etc.) OR, if project is not portable, make a poster with 4 – 6 labeled sequential photos of the woodworking project. (See General Requirements #9.)  Attach a 3″x5″ index card listing other items made in the project.  Members may enter only items that they have made from scratch, not from parts pre-cut by a parent or 4-H Leader or from a commercial kit.

Creativity Unlimited
Any exhibit made entirely by the 4-H’er during the current 4-H year in a project that isn’t covered under another project category in these rules.  Label the exhibit card with “Creativity Unlimited” and the name of the project (e. g., “Creativity Unlimited – Composting”).  More than one exhibit may be entered in this category as long as it is about a bona fide 4-H Project, and it is the member’s only entry in that project.  Leaders are asked to carefully check these exhibits to make sure they fit this category.

 

4‑H CLOTHING PROJECT ADVISER’S REFERENCE SHEET

The 4‑H Clothing Advisor works with girls and boys, helping them develop skills in clothing construction and learning to be wise clothing consumers.  Your role is one of guidance where the 4‑H’er “learns by doing.”  Developmental levels are a helpful, positive way for assessing the member’s ability and growth in the 4‑H Clothing Project.  Competence, not age or number of years in the project, is the factor which determines the level in which a 4-H’er participates.

BEGINNER – The beginning 4-H clothing member is expected to accomplish many of the following basic skills:

  • Select good tools
  • Develop good work habits
  • Learn to use a sewing machine
  • Sew by hand
  • Choose fabrics
  • Prepare fabrics for sewing
  • Press
  • Put in elastic
  • Make a narrow hem

Developing these skills may take a year for some members, two or three for others.  Not all garments will illustrate all of the skills, so members may not learn them all and may move on to the next level when ready to tackle those skills.

INTERMEDIATE - Intermediate members should know most beginner techniques and develop the following skills:

  • Choose a pattern
  • Prepare and cut out a garment
  • Transfer pattern markings, stay stitch
  • Apply collars and cuffs
  • Make darts
  • Learn seam finishes
  • Make machine buttonholes
  • Put in hems
  • Apply zippers, interfacing, facing
  • Patch pockets, fasteners
  • Set in sleeves

A 4-H member will normally spend two or three years at this level and may move on before learning all of these skills.

ADVANCEDThe advanced 4-H clothing member is expected to utilize the sewing skills applicable to the item being made.  He/she will learn how to work with fabrics needing special handling and develop techniques requiring time, patience, and talent.  Some advanced skills include:

1.  Special Stitching

  • top stitching
  • decorative stitching
  • hand rolled hems
  • thread chain loops
  • pin tucks
  • hand quilting
  • shirring
  • smocking
  • applique’
  • embroidery
  • decorative padding

2.  Special Trim

  • hand knotted fringe
  • mitered band or braid
  • cording

3.  Special Closures

  • fabric loop and button
  • hanging snaps
  • fly front
  • separating zipper
  • hand picked zipper
  • invisible zipper
  • bound buttonholes

4. Special Fabrics

  • lace
  • sheers
  • vinyl
  • leather
  • fake fur
  • lame’
  • velvet
  • quilted
  • velveteen
  • plaids
  • stripes

5.  Other Special Techniques

  • advanced pattern alterations
  • curved insets
  • gussets
  • set-in or welt pockets
  • cuff or neckline placket
  • bias-cut garment
  • French or flat-felled seams
  • belt and belt loops
  • lining
  • tailoring skills — modified and dressmaker

In addition to the materials provided to the member, you, the 4-H’er’s parent, or the Extension Office may have other resources on clothing construction.  REMEMBER, THERE IS NO SINGLE 4-H WAY!  There are many acceptable methods of construction.  Depending on the fabric and the person’s skills and preference, several alternatives can be used.  What may work well for one person can be a disaster for the next.  Be flexible and adventurous!

 

4-H  KNITTED PROJECT GUIDELINES SHEET

Level:

  • Beginner — any article showing either garter stitch (all knit), or stockinet stitch (knit & purl).
  • Intermediate — any article showing the beginner level of stitches plus three of the techniques listed below.
  • Advanced — any article showing the beginner level plus four or more of the techniques listed below.

Yarn & Pattern:

  • pattern appropriate to level of knitter
  • yarn appropriate for selected project

Stitches:

  • stitches uniform throughout

Edges:

  • uniform cast-on edges
  • uniform bound-off edges

Finishing:

  • secure, straight seams
  • yarn ends neatly woven in
  • even, neat hand-sewn seams
  • blocking

Techniques: (to include the following, but not limited to these)

  • Shaping:  increasing, decreasing, short rows
  • Texture Pattern:  cables, all over pattern, lace, slipstitch pattern
  • Decorating Features:  I-cord, bobbles, embroidery
  • Structural Features:  buttonholes, pockets, zipper,  ribbing, hem, facing
  • Color:  stripes, Fair Isle (2 or more colors in one row), intarsia
  • Circular Knitting


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